Special Issue "Probing Single Events at the Nanoscale"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Yuri Diaz Fernandez
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX, United Kingdom
Interests: colloidal chemistry; self-assembled nanomaterials; correlative microscopy; bio-interface imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent developments on time and spatially resolved analytical techniques have opened new avenues for understanding the processes and properties of materials and living systems at the nanoscale with unprecedented levels of sensitivity and reliability. Non-linear optical methods have allowed for the flourishing of multi-photon fluorescence microscopes able to probe sub-micron events in complex biological systems. Correlative microscopy techniques, combining electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and nanoparticle bio-conjugates, have advanced further the forefront of research by enabling ultra-resolution imaging of subcellular processes down to single molecular interactions. Indirect plasmonic sensing has emerged as a reliable technique for probing processes at the single nanoparticle level, while consolidated analytical chemistry methods, such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), have also reached single-particle sensitivity and diversified into spatially resolved modes by incorporating laser ablation techniques. Other areas of research, focused on structural characterization of materials and molecules, have benefitted enormously from analytical methods based on high intense synchrotron radiation, cryo electron microscopy (cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The scientific community is facing a revolution centered on the need for reliable probing of single nano-events and correlating them with bulk observables of technological relevance. This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will cover the emerging field of “Probing Single Events at the Nanoscale”, providing a broad and inclusive forum at the interface between nanotechnology, analytical chemistry, structural biology, and engineering of microscopy tools. We welcome research articles, literature reviews, and perspective papers that could contribute to this exciting research field.

Dr. Yuri Diaz Fernandez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • single-molecule imaging
  • single-particle sensing
  • correlative microscopy
  • indirect plasmonic sensing
  • sp-ICPMS
  • STM
  • cryo-EM
  • synchrotron radiation

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Chlortetracycline-Functionalized Silver Nanoparticles as a Colorimetric Probe for Aminoglycosides: Ultrasensitive Determination of Kanamycin and Streptomycin
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 997; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050997 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
Aminoglycosides (AMGs) have been extensively used to treat infectious diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria in livestock and humans. A selective and sensitive colorimetric probe for the determination of streptomycin and kanamycin was proposed based on chlortetracycline-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs–CTC) as the sensing element. [...] Read more.
Aminoglycosides (AMGs) have been extensively used to treat infectious diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria in livestock and humans. A selective and sensitive colorimetric probe for the determination of streptomycin and kanamycin was proposed based on chlortetracycline-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs–CTC) as the sensing element. Almost all of the tested aminoglycoside antibiotics can rapidly induce the aggregation of AgNPs, along with a color change from yellow to orange/red. The selective detection of aminoglycoside antibiotics, including tobramycin, streptomycin, amikacin, gentamicin, neomycin, and kanamycin, with other types of antibiotics, can be achieved by ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy. This developed colorimetric assay has ability to detect various AMGs using in-depth surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies. With this determination of streptomycin and kanamycin was achieved at the picomolar level (pM) by using a UV–visible spectrophotometer. Under aqueous conditions, the linear range of the colorimetric sensor for streptomycin and kanamycin was 1000–1,1000 and 120–480 pM, respectively. The corresponding limit of detection was 2000 pM and 120 pM, respectively. Thus, the validated dual colorimetric and ratiometric method can find various analytical applications for the ultrasensitive and rapid detection of AMG antibiotics in water samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probing Single Events at the Nanoscale)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop