Special Issue "Innovative Nanomaterials and Nanocomposites for Photocatalytic Removal of Organic Pollutants"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Olga Sacco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and Biology "A. Zambelli", University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (SA), Italy
Interests: synthesis and characterization of catalytic materials; phosphors-based nanomaterials; nanostructured photocatalysts and supports; photocatalysis for the removal of pollutants from water and wastewater; membrane separation processes
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Heterogeneous photocatalysis can be considered as one of the main challenges in the field of water and wastewater treatment, because a heterogeneous photocatalytic process is able to work at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure.

Currently, ZnO- or TiO2-based nanomaterials are the most-studied photocatalysts and have attracted a great deal of interest due to their unique physical-chemical properties. Consequently, they have been exploited as promising materials for the removal of a wide variety of organic pollutants present in water and wastewater, as well as gaseous streams. On the other hand, despite the great benefits associated to TiO2- or ZnO-based nanomaterials, there are still open questions about the synthesis and photocatalytic efficiency of novel nanomaterials and nanocomposites as well as the design of nanostructured semiconducting materials immobilized on macroscopic supports.

This Special Issue is focused on “Innovative Nanomaterials and Nanocomposites for Photocatalytic Removal of Organic Pollutants”, featuring the state-of-the-art in this field. Research papers related to the synthesis and characterization of novel nanomaterials or nanocomposites (active under UV or visible light, as well as under solar light) and their uses in the removal of pollutants form liquid and gaseous phases are welcome in this Special Issue.

Dr. Olga Sacco
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photocatalysis
  • nanomaterials
  • nanocomposites
  • nanostructured photocatalysts
  • macroscopic supports
  • UV and visible light
  • solar light
  • water and wastewater treatment
  • gaseous streams treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Highly Robust and Selective System for Water Pollutants Removal: How to Transform a Traditional Photocatalyst into a Highly Robust and Selective System for Water Pollutants Removal
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1509; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111509 - 23 Oct 2019
Abstract
Highly porous monolithic aerogels based on ZnO photocatalyst and syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS) were obtained by supercritical CO2 treatment of ZnO/s-PS gels. The prepared aerogels were characterized and their photocatalytic activity was evaluated using phenol and toluene as water pollutant models. The s-PS [...] Read more.
Highly porous monolithic aerogels based on ZnO photocatalyst and syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS) were obtained by supercritical CO2 treatment of ZnO/s-PS gels. The prepared aerogels were characterized and their photocatalytic activity was evaluated using phenol and toluene as water pollutant models. The s-PS nanoporous crystalline phase, able to absorb pollutant molecules, was proven to be necessary to ensure high photocatalytic efficiency as the aerogel acts not only as a support, but also as pollutant pre-concentrator. The reusability of ZnO/s-PS aerogels is also strong showing no decrease in photocatalytic activity after six consecutive degradation trials. Finally, the aerogel matrix prevents ZnO dissolution occurring under acidic conditions and promotes a selective removal of the pollutants. The synergy between the photocatalyst and the innovative polymeric support provides the composite system with robustness, chemical stability, easy recovery after treatment, high efficiency of pollutant removal with a marked selectivity which make these materials promising for large scale applications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Dyes via Defect-Rich TiO2 Prepared by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 720; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050720 - 09 May 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The dye wastewater produced in the printing and dyeing industry causes serious harm to the natural environment. TiO2 usually shows photocatalytic degradation of dye under the irradiation ultravilet light rather than visible light. In this work, a large number of oxygen vacancies [...] Read more.
The dye wastewater produced in the printing and dyeing industry causes serious harm to the natural environment. TiO2 usually shows photocatalytic degradation of dye under the irradiation ultravilet light rather than visible light. In this work, a large number of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ defects were generated on the surface of the TiO2 nanoparticles via Ar plasma. Compared with pristine TiO2 nanoparticles, the as-obtained Ar plasma-treated TiO2 (Ar-TiO2) nanoparticles make the energy band gap reduce from 3.21 eV to 3.17 eV and exhibit enhanced photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes. The Ar-TiO2 obtained exhibited excellent degradation properties of methyl orange (MO); the degradation rate under sunlight irradiation was 99.6% in 30 min, and the photocatalytic performance was about twice that of the original TiO2 nanoparticles (49%). The degradation rate under visible light (λ > 400 nm) irradiation was 89% in 150 min, and the photocatalytic performance of the Ar-TiO2 was approaching ~4 times higher than that of the original TiO2 nanoparticles (23%). Ar-TiO2 also showed good degradation performance in degrading rhodamine B (Rho B) and methylene blue (MB). We believe that this plasma strategy provides a new method for improving the photocatalytic activity of other metal oxides. Full article
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