Special Issue "10th Anniversary of Nanomaterials—Recent Advances in Environmental Nanoscience and Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Nanoscience and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 February 2022) | Viewed by 11429

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Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ioannis V. Yentekakis
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Guest Editor
Physical Chemistry and Chemical Processes Laboratory, School of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete (TUC), 73100 Chania, Greece
Interests: nanomaterials and nanotechnology; heterogeneous nano-catalysis; environmental catalysis (NOx, N2O; CO, CH4, VOCs, H2S and SO2 emissions control); catalysts’ promotion; electrochemical promotion; surfaces and interfaces; electrochemistry; fuel cells; CO2 utilization; biogas and natural gas valorization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are celebrating the 10th anniversary of Nanomaterials with a Special Issue in the Section “Environmental Nanoscience and Nanotechnology” (ISSN 2079-4991; CODEN: NANOKO) in 2020.

On behalf of the Editor-in-Chief, Prof. Dr. Shirley Chiang, and of members of the Editorial Office, we would like to take this opportunity to thank our authors and reviewers for their valuable contributions and for ensuring that Nanomaterials is a successful and respected journal in its field. To highlight this anniversary, we will lead a Special Issue that will cover various topics related to Environmental Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. This section aims to host significant advances in the aforementioned areas including, but not limited to:

  • Emissions control of mobile and stationary sources: De-(NOx, HCs, VOCs, H2S, CO, soot);
  • Greenhouse gas abatement and utilization: CO2 capture and transformation to methane and renewable fuels; N2O abatement; CH4 valorization;
  • Waste transformation to added-value products;
  • Clean energy production: H2 production and cleaning (CH4, biogas and hydrocarbons reforming, water-gas-shift reaction, preferential CO oxidation reaction, etc.);
  • Novel nanostructured electrodes and fuel cell design and applications;
  • Photoelectrochemical wastewater treatment;
  • Advanced preparation methods and approaches for the rational design and fabrication of nanostructured (up to atomic level) materials, for tailoring and fine-tuning of their critical physicochemical properties and local chemistry and for promoting active sites performance and stability in respect of the above implementations, as well as all aspects of characterization and in-depth understanding structure–activity correlations.

Prof. Dr. Ioannis V. Yentekakis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
The 10th Anniversary of Nanomaterials—Recent Advances in Environmental Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(6), 915; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12060915 - 10 Mar 2022
Viewed by 643
Abstract
As a result of the rapid growth of nanoscience and nanotechnology, including advanced methods of fabrication and characterization of nanostructured materials, great progress has been made in many fields of science, not least in environmental catalysis, energy production and sustainability [...] Full article

Research

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Article
Support Effects on the Activity of Ni Catalysts for the Propane Steam Reforming Reaction
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 1948; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11081948 - 28 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 956
Abstract
The catalytic performance of supported Ni catalysts for the propane steam reforming reaction was investigated with respect to the nature of the support. It was found that Ni is much more active when supported on ZrO2 or YSZ compared to TiO2 [...] Read more.
The catalytic performance of supported Ni catalysts for the propane steam reforming reaction was investigated with respect to the nature of the support. It was found that Ni is much more active when supported on ZrO2 or YSZ compared to TiO2, whereas Al2O3− and CeO2-supported catalysts exhibit intermediate performance. The turnover frequency (TOF) of C3H8 conversion increases by more than one order of magnitude in the order Ni/TiO2 < Ni/CeO2 < Ni/Al2O3 < Ni/YSZ < Ni/ZrO2, accompanied by a parallel increase of the selectivity toward the intermediate methane produced. In situ FTIR experiments indicate that CHx species produced via the dissociative adsorption of propane are the key reaction intermediates, with their hydrogenation to CH4 and/or conversion to formates and, eventually, to CO, being favored over the most active Ni/ZrO2 catalyst. Long term stability test showed that Ni/ZrO2 exhibits excellent stability for more than 30 h on stream and thus, it can be considered as a suitable catalyst for the production of H2 via propane steam reforming. Full article
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Article
Propane Steam Reforming over Catalysts Derived from Noble Metal (Ru, Rh)-Substituted LaNiO3 and La0.8Sr0.2NiO3 Perovskite Precursors
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 1931; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11081931 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 938
Abstract
The propane steam reforming (PSR) reaction was investigated over catalysts derived from LaNiO3 (LN), La0.8Sr0.2NiO3 (LSN), and noble metal-substituted LNMx and LSNMx (M = Ru, Rh; x = 0.01, 0.1) perovskites. The incorporation of foreign [...] Read more.
The propane steam reforming (PSR) reaction was investigated over catalysts derived from LaNiO3 (LN), La0.8Sr0.2NiO3 (LSN), and noble metal-substituted LNMx and LSNMx (M = Ru, Rh; x = 0.01, 0.1) perovskites. The incorporation of foreign cations in the A and/or B sites of the perovskite structure resulted in an increase in the specific surface area, a shift of XRD lines toward lower diffraction angles, and a decrease of the mean primary crystallite size of the parent material. Exposure of the as-prepared samples to reaction conditions resulted in the in situ development of new phases including metallic Ni and La2O2CO3, which participate actively in the PSR reaction. The LN-derived catalyst exhibited higher activity compared to LSN, and its performance for the title reaction did not change appreciably following partial substitution of Ru for Ni. In contrast, incorporation of Ru and, especially, Rh in the LSN perovskite matrix resulted in the development of catalysts with significantly enhanced catalytic performance, which improved by increasing the noble metal content. The best results were obtained for the LSNRh0.1-derived sample, which exhibited excellent long-term stability for 40 hours on stream as well as high propane conversion (XC3H8 = 92%) and H2 selectivity (SH2 = 97%) at 600 °C. Full article
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Article
Nanocarbon from Rocket Fuel Waste: The Case of Furfuryl Alcohol-Fuming Nitric Acid Hypergolic Pair
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010001 - 22 Dec 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1339
Abstract
In hypergolics two substances ignite spontaneously upon contact without external aid. Although the concept mostly applies to rocket fuels and propellants, it is only recently that hypergolics has been recognized from our group as a radically new methodology towards carbon materials synthesis. Comparatively [...] Read more.
In hypergolics two substances ignite spontaneously upon contact without external aid. Although the concept mostly applies to rocket fuels and propellants, it is only recently that hypergolics has been recognized from our group as a radically new methodology towards carbon materials synthesis. Comparatively to other preparative methods, hypergolics allows the rapid and spontaneous formation of carbon at ambient conditions in an exothermic manner (e.g., the method releases both carbon and energy at room temperature and atmospheric pressure). In an effort to further build upon the idea of hypergolic synthesis, herein we exploit a classic liquid rocket bipropellant composed of furfuryl alcohol and fuming nitric acid to prepare carbon nanosheets by simply mixing the two reagents at ambient conditions. Furfuryl alcohol served as the carbon source while fuming nitric acid as a strong oxidizer. On ignition the temperature is raised high enough to induce carbonization in a sort of in-situ pyrolytic process. Simultaneously, the released energy was directly converted into useful work, such as heating a liquid to boiling or placing Crookes radiometer into motion. Apart from its value as a new synthesis approach in materials science, carbon from rocket fuel additionally provides a practical way in processing rocket fuel waste or disposed rocket fuels. Full article
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Review

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Review
Transition Metal Phosphides (TMP) as a Versatile Class of Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation Reaction (HDO) of Oil-Derived Compounds
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(9), 1435; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12091435 - 22 Apr 2022
Viewed by 725
Abstract
Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reaction is a route with much to offer in the conversion and upgrading of bio-oils into fuels; the latter can potentially replace fossil fuels. The catalyst’s design and the feedstock play a critical role in the process metrics (activity, selectivity). Among [...] Read more.
Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reaction is a route with much to offer in the conversion and upgrading of bio-oils into fuels; the latter can potentially replace fossil fuels. The catalyst’s design and the feedstock play a critical role in the process metrics (activity, selectivity). Among the different classes of catalysts for the HDO reaction, the transition metal phosphides (TMP), e.g., binary (Ni2P, CoP, WP, MoP) and ternary Fe-Co-P, Fe-Ru-P, are chosen to be discussed in the present review article due to their chameleon type of structural and electronic features giving them superiority compared to the pure metals, apart from their cost advantage. Their active catalytic sites for the HDO reaction are discussed, while particular aspects of their structural, morphological, electronic, and bonding features are presented along with the corresponding characterization technique/tool. The HDO reaction is critically discussed for representative compounds on the TMP surfaces; model compounds from the lignin-derivatives, cellulose derivatives, and fatty acids, such as phenols and furans, are presented, and their reaction mechanisms are explained in terms of TMPs structure, stoichiometry, and reaction conditions. The deactivation of the TMP’s catalysts under HDO conditions is discussed. Insights of the HDO reaction from computational aspects over the TMPs are also presented. Future challenges and directions are proposed to understand the TMP-probe molecule interaction under HDO process conditions and advance the process to a mature level. Full article
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Review
Enzyme-Loaded Flower-Shaped Nanomaterials: A Versatile Platform with Biosensing, Biocatalytic, and Environmental Promise
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(6), 1460; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11061460 - 31 May 2021
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 1575
Abstract
As a result of their unique structural and multifunctional characteristics, organic–inorganic hybrid nanoflowers (hNFs), a newly developed class of flower-like, well-structured and well-oriented materials has gained significant attention. The structural attributes along with the surface-engineered functional entities of hNFs, e.g., their size, shape, [...] Read more.
As a result of their unique structural and multifunctional characteristics, organic–inorganic hybrid nanoflowers (hNFs), a newly developed class of flower-like, well-structured and well-oriented materials has gained significant attention. The structural attributes along with the surface-engineered functional entities of hNFs, e.g., their size, shape, surface orientation, structural integrity, stability under reactive environments, enzyme stabilizing capability, and organic–inorganic ratio, all significantly contribute to and determine their applications. Although hNFs are still in their infancy and in the early stage of robust development, the recent hike in biotechnology at large and nanotechnology in particular is making hNFs a versatile platform for constructing enzyme-loaded/immobilized structures for different applications. For instance, detection- and sensing-based applications, environmental- and sustainability-based applications, and biocatalytic and biotransformation applications are of supreme interest. Considering the above points, herein we reviewed current advances in multifunctional hNFs, with particular emphasis on (1) critical factors, (2) different metal/non-metal-based synthesizing processes (i.e., (i) copper-based hNFs, (ii) calcium-based hNFs, (iii) manganese-based hNFs, (iv) zinc-based hNFs, (v) cobalt-based hNFs, (vi) iron-based hNFs, (vii) multi-metal-based hNFs, and (viii) non-metal-based hNFs), and (3) their applications. Moreover, the interfacial mechanism involved in hNF development is also discussed considering the following three critical points: (1) the combination of metal ions and organic matter, (2) petal formation, and (3) the generation of hNFs. In summary, the literature given herein could be used to engineer hNFs for multipurpose applications in the biosensing, biocatalysis, and other environmental sectors. Full article
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Review
Bimetallic Ni-Based Catalysts for CO2 Methanation: A Review
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010028 - 24 Dec 2020
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 4537
Abstract
CO2 methanation has recently emerged as a process that targets the reduction in anthropogenic CO2 emissions, via the conversion of CO2 captured from point and mobile sources, as well as H2 produced from renewables into CH4. Ni, [...] Read more.
CO2 methanation has recently emerged as a process that targets the reduction in anthropogenic CO2 emissions, via the conversion of CO2 captured from point and mobile sources, as well as H2 produced from renewables into CH4. Ni, among the early transition metals, as well as Ru and Rh, among the noble metals, have been known to be among the most active methanation catalysts, with Ni being favoured due to its low cost and high natural abundance. However, insufficient low-temperature activity, low dispersion and reducibility, as well as nanoparticle sintering are some of the main drawbacks when using Ni-based catalysts. Such problems can be partly overcome via the introduction of a second transition metal (e.g., Fe, Co) or a noble metal (e.g., Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd and Re) in Ni-based catalysts. Through Ni-M alloy formation, or the intricate synergy between two adjacent metallic phases, new high-performing and low-cost methanation catalysts can be obtained. This review summarizes and critically discusses recent progress made in the field of bimetallic Ni-M (M = Fe, Co, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Re)-based catalyst development for the CO2 methanation reaction. Full article
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