Special Issue "Nanotechnology in Agriculture and Food Industry"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cubadda Francesco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Superiore di Sanità - National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy
Interests: analytical chemistry; food safety; micronutrient nutrition; nanomaterials; nanotoxicology; nanotechnology agri-food applications; risk assessment
Dr. Federica Aureli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Superiore di Sanità - National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy
Interests: analytical chemistry; mass spectrometry; hyphenated techniques; nanomaterials; food safety; risk assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The broad area of food, nutrition, and health is becoming a favorite sector for nanotechnology applications aimed at generating novel and useful properties by bringing materials to the nanoscale. This is especially true in the agri–food sector, where a number of nanotechnology applications are rapidly emerging in a variety of areas, from agricultural production (e.g. nano-formulated agrochemicals, such as nano-fertilizers and nano-pesticides, animal feeds, etc.), to food processing (nano-sized ingredients, nutritional supplements, and additives) and packaging (food contact materials).

It is indisputable that nanotechnology applications in the food sector may bring benefits, for example, they may lead to the production of improved nutrient sources (as a result of higher bioavailability or less severe side-effects upon ingestion). However, potential risks have to be assessed and excluded. Although making materials smaller can generate novel and useful properties, concerns exist on the potential risks related to the interactions of nano-sized materials with cellular components, which may ultimately harm human health. The unique physicochemical properties of engineered nanomaterials may influence the toxicological properties, first of all the toxicokinetic behaviour, and an appropriate nano-specific risk assessment has to be carried out for nanotechnology applications that result in the presence of nanoparticles in food.

This Special Issue aims to provide an overview of the current and projected nanotechnology applications in agriculture and the food industry, as well as of the developments in assessing the safety of nanomaterials, with emphasis on the development of appropriate nano-specific risk assessment approaches.

Dr. Cubadda Francesco
Dr. Federica Aureli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanotechnology applications
  • agricultural production
  • food processing
  • food packaging
  • nano-safety
  • nano-specific risk assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Zerovalent Iron Nanoparticles on Photosynthesis and Biochemical Adaptation of Soil-Grown Arabidopsis thaliana
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1543; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111543 - 30 Oct 2019
Abstract
Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) is the most widely used nanomaterial for environmental remediation. The impacts of nZVI on terrestrial organisms have been recently reported, and in particular, plant growth was promoted by nZVI treatment in various concentrations. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate [...] Read more.
Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) is the most widely used nanomaterial for environmental remediation. The impacts of nZVI on terrestrial organisms have been recently reported, and in particular, plant growth was promoted by nZVI treatment in various concentrations. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the detailed physiological and biochemical responses of plants toward nZVI treatment for agricultural application. Here, the effects of nZVI on photosynthesis and related biochemical adaptation of soil-grown Arabidopsis thaliana were examined. After treatment with 500 mg nZVI/kg soil, the plant biomass increased by 38% through enhanced photosynthesis, which was confirmed by the gas-exchange system, carbon isotope ratio and chlorophyll content analysis. Besides, the iron uptake of the plant increased in roots and leaves. The magnetic property measurements and transmission electron microscopy showed that the transformed particles were accumulated in parts of the plant tissues. The accumulation of carbohydrates such as glucose, sucrose and starch increased by the enhanced photosynthesis, and photosynthetic-related inorganic nutrients such as phosphorus, manganese and zinc maintained homeostasis, according to the increased iron uptake. These findings suggest that nZVI has additional or alternative benefits as a nano-fertilizer and a promoter of CO2 uptake in plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnology in Agriculture and Food Industry)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Application of Polyphenol-Loaded Nanoparticles in Food Industry
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1629; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111629 - 16 Nov 2019
Abstract
Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science, and nanotechnological concepts have been intensively studied for potential applications in the food industry. Nanoparticles (with dimensions ranging from one to several hundred nanometers) have specific characteristics and better functionality, thanks to their size and other [...] Read more.
Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science, and nanotechnological concepts have been intensively studied for potential applications in the food industry. Nanoparticles (with dimensions ranging from one to several hundred nanometers) have specific characteristics and better functionality, thanks to their size and other physicochemical properties. Polyphenols are recognized as active compounds that have several putative beneficial properties, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity. However, the use of polyphenols as functional food ingredients faces numerous challenges, such as their poor stability, solubility, and bioavailability. These difficulties could be solved relatively easily by the application of encapsulation. The objective of this review is to present the most recent accomplishments in the usage of polyphenol-loaded nanoparticles in food science. Nanoparticles loaded with polyphenols and their applications as active ingredients for improving physicochemical and functional properties of food, or as components of active packaging materials, were critically reviewed. Potential adverse effects of polyphenol-loaded nanomaterials are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnology in Agriculture and Food Industry)
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