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Special Issue "Fining Agents in Wine"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Encarna Gómez-Plaza
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain
Interests: wine; fining agents; phenolic compounds; volatile compounds; organoleptic properties; tannins; wine stabilization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Rocio Gil-Muñoz
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Murciano de Investigacion y Desarrollo Agrario y Alimentario, La Alberca, Spain
Interests: wine; grape; phenolic compounds; volatile compounds; ochratoxin A; biogenic amines
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wine fining is an enological practice used over the centuries to eliminate undesirable wine components that may negatively affect quality, stability and/or safety. The final aim is to improve the visual and sensory quality of the resulting wine and to limit the presence of undesirable substances. Some of the fining agents have been used for a long time, however, in recent years, problems with some of them due to their allergenic nature have led to a search for alternatives and innovative processes. Due to all these aspects, we feel that there is a need for a Special Issue to join together the various and latest findings of this field. For the readers, this Special Issue will provide an attractive opportunity to more easily obtain information concerning the different facets of wine fining. For the authors, it will be an appropriate occasion to make their results and analyses more visible. This Special Issue will contain contributions discussing all the aspects broadly indicated by the keywords. Review articles by experts in the field will also be welcome.

Dr. Encarna Gómez-Plaza
Dr. Rocio Gil-Muñoz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wine fining
  • Turbidiy
  • Haze
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Volatile compounds
  • Biogenic amines
  • Ocratoxin A
  • Heavy metals
  • Proteins
  • Innovations in wine fining
  • Healthy issues

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Phenolic Composition Influences the Effectiveness of Fining Agents in Vegan-Friendly Red Wine Production
Molecules 2020, 25(1), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25010120 - 28 Dec 2019
Abstract
Plant proteins have been proposed as an alternative to animal-origin proteins in the wine industry because they are allergen-free and vegan-friendly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of plant proteins as fining agents on red wines with different phenolic [...] Read more.
Plant proteins have been proposed as an alternative to animal-origin proteins in the wine industry because they are allergen-free and vegan-friendly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of plant proteins as fining agents on red wines with different phenolic composition. Two formulations for commercially available vegetal proteins (potato and pea origin) were assessed at two doses to modulate the fining treatment to the wine phenolic profile. The results evidenced that fining agents derived from plants have different levels of effectiveness on the removal of phenolic compounds depending on the origin, the formulation used, dose applied, and also wine characteristics. On Nebbiolo wine, the study was particularly significant due to its phenolic composition. One pea-based fining agent had an effect comparable to gelatin (animal origin) on the removal of polymeric flavanols with a minor loss of anthocyanins and therefore better preserving the wine color in terms of intensity and hue. For Primitivo, Montepulciano, and Syrah wines, even though there was a formulation-dependent effect, vegetal proteins gave more balanced reductions in terms of target phenolic compounds contributing to astringency and color perception. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fining Agents in Wine)
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Open AccessArticle
Potato Protein Fining of Phenolic Compounds in Red Wine: A Study of the Kinetics and the Impact of Wine Matrix Components and Physical Factors
Molecules 2019, 24(24), 4578; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24244578 - 13 Dec 2019
Abstract
Producing wines within an acceptable range of astringency is important for quality and consumer acceptance. Astringency can be modified by fining during the winemaking process and the use of vegetable proteins (especially potato proteins) as fining agents has gained increasing interest due to [...] Read more.
Producing wines within an acceptable range of astringency is important for quality and consumer acceptance. Astringency can be modified by fining during the winemaking process and the use of vegetable proteins (especially potato proteins) as fining agents has gained increasing interest due to consumers’ requirements. The research presented was the first to investigate the effect of a potato protein dose on the kinetics of tannin and phenolic removal compared to gelatin for two unfined Cabernet Sauvignon wines. To further understand the results, the influence of the wine matrix and fining parameters (including pH, ethanol concentration, sugar concentration, temperature, and agitation) were tested according to a fractional 25-1 factorial design on one of the Cabernet Sauvignon wines using potato proteins. The results from the factorial design indicate that potato protein fining was significantly influenced by wine pH, ethanol concentration, fining temperature as well as an interaction (pH × ethanol) but not by sugar content or agitation. Insights into the steps required for the optimisation of fining were gained from the study, revealing that potato protein fining efficiency could be increased by treating wines at higher temperatures (20 °C, rather than the conventional 10–15 °C), and at both a lower pH and/or alcohol concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fining Agents in Wine)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of the Use of Purified Grape Pomace as a Fining Agent on the Volatile Composition of Monastrell Wines
Molecules 2019, 24(13), 2423; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24132423 - 01 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
(1) Background: The lack of viable alternatives for the industrial exploitation of grape pomace is one of the reasons why it is considered a serious environmental pollutant. However, as a byproduct, it could be used as a fining agent, since previous studies have [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The lack of viable alternatives for the industrial exploitation of grape pomace is one of the reasons why it is considered a serious environmental pollutant. However, as a byproduct, it could be used as a fining agent, since previous studies have shown that it is able to eliminate undesirable substances in wine. However, the little information available does not describe its effect on wine aroma. (2) Methods: Purified grape pomace extracts were used for fining a red wine and their effect on the volatile compounds of the wine was assessed, comparing the results with those obtained with different commercial fining agents. (3) Results: The results showed how purified grape pomace decreased the total volatile content of a wine to a similar extent as other fining products, such as yeast extracts or gelatin. Among the different families of volatile compounds analyzed, only total esters and terpenes differed from the levels recorded for a control wine, being slightly lower. No statistical differences were found for the rest of the volatile compounds (alcohols, carbonyl, lactones, and acids) compared with the levels measured in control wine. (4) Conclusions: The results suggest that purified grape pomace could be used as a non-allergenic wine fining agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fining Agents in Wine)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Wine Fining with Plant Proteins
Molecules 2019, 24(11), 2186; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24112186 - 11 Jun 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
Fining treatments involve the addition of a substance or a mixture to wine, and are generally carried out in order to clarify, stabilize or modify the wine’s organoleptic characteristics. Usually these fining agents will bind the target compound(s) to form insoluble aggregates that [...] Read more.
Fining treatments involve the addition of a substance or a mixture to wine, and are generally carried out in order to clarify, stabilize or modify the wine’s organoleptic characteristics. Usually these fining agents will bind the target compound(s) to form insoluble aggregates that are subsequently removed from the wine. The main reasons to perform wine fining treatments are to carry out wine clarification, stabilization and to remove phenolic compounds imparting unwanted sensory characteristics on the wine, which is an operation that often relies on the use of animal proteins, such as casein, gelatin, egg and fish proteins. However, due to the allergenic potential of these animal proteins, there is an increasing interest in developing alternative solutions including the use of fining proteins extracted from plants (e.g., proteins from cereals, grape seeds, potatoes, legumes, etc.), and non-proteinaceous plant-based substances (e.g., cell wall polysaccharides and pomace materials). In this article, the state of the art alternative fining agents of plant origins are reviewed for the first time, including considerations of their organoleptic and technological effects on wine, and of the allergenic risks that they can pose for consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fining Agents in Wine)
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