Next Article in Journal
FePc and FePcF16 on Rutile TiO2(110) and (100): Influence of the Substrate Preparation on the Interaction Strength
Next Article in Special Issue
Phenolic Composition Influences the Effectiveness of Fining Agents in Vegan-Friendly Red Wine Production
Previous Article in Journal
Polyphenols, Antioxidant, Antibacterial, and Biofilm Inhibitory Activities of Peel and Pulp of Citrus medica L., Citrus bergamia, and Citrus medica cv. Salò Cultivated in Southern Italy
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effect of the Use of Purified Grape Pomace as a Fining Agent on the Volatile Composition of Monastrell Wines
Open AccessArticle

Potato Protein Fining of Phenolic Compounds in Red Wine: A Study of the Kinetics and the Impact of Wine Matrix Components and Physical Factors

1
School of Agriculture, Food & Wine, Waite Campus, The University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia
2
The Australian Wine Research Institute, Hartley Grove, Urrbrae, Adelaide, SA 5064, Australia
3
Wine Australia, Industry House, Corner Hackney and Botanic Roads, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Encarna Gómez-Plaza and Rocio Gil-Muñoz
Molecules 2019, 24(24), 4578; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24244578
Received: 28 November 2019 / Revised: 10 December 2019 / Accepted: 12 December 2019 / Published: 13 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fining Agents in Wine)
Producing wines within an acceptable range of astringency is important for quality and consumer acceptance. Astringency can be modified by fining during the winemaking process and the use of vegetable proteins (especially potato proteins) as fining agents has gained increasing interest due to consumers’ requirements. The research presented was the first to investigate the effect of a potato protein dose on the kinetics of tannin and phenolic removal compared to gelatin for two unfined Cabernet Sauvignon wines. To further understand the results, the influence of the wine matrix and fining parameters (including pH, ethanol concentration, sugar concentration, temperature, and agitation) were tested according to a fractional 25-1 factorial design on one of the Cabernet Sauvignon wines using potato proteins. The results from the factorial design indicate that potato protein fining was significantly influenced by wine pH, ethanol concentration, fining temperature as well as an interaction (pH × ethanol) but not by sugar content or agitation. Insights into the steps required for the optimisation of fining were gained from the study, revealing that potato protein fining efficiency could be increased by treating wines at higher temperatures (20 °C, rather than the conventional 10–15 °C), and at both a lower pH and/or alcohol concentration. View Full-Text
Keywords: wine; fining; potato proteins; gelatin; phenolics; tannin; Cabernet Sauvignon; design of experiments; factorial design; process optimisation wine; fining; potato proteins; gelatin; phenolics; tannin; Cabernet Sauvignon; design of experiments; factorial design; process optimisation
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Kang, W.; Muhlack, R.A.; Bindon, K.A.; Smith, P.A.; Niimi, J.; Bastian, S.E. Potato Protein Fining of Phenolic Compounds in Red Wine: A Study of the Kinetics and the Impact of Wine Matrix Components and Physical Factors. Molecules 2019, 24, 4578.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop