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Special Issue "Herbal Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases Prevention and Therapy"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Brian Tomlinson
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao
Interests: natural products; lipids; hypertension; diabetes; pharmacogenetics; ethnic differences of drug responses.
Prof. Paul Chan
Website
Guest Editor
Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University (TMU), Taiwan
Interests: medcine; blood pressure; superoxide dismutase; cardiac myocytes; endothelin-1; gene expression; reactive oxygen species

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death throughout the world. The prevalence may have plateaued in some developed countries, but it is still increasing in many developing countries. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the major underlying cause, with the risk factors of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and diabetes mellitus being highly prevalent in most populations. Increasing rates of obesity have fueled the epidemic of diabetes and contributed to increases in blood pressure and lipid disorders. Many effective drugs are available to treat hypertension, and in recent years, several new classes of agents to manage hyperglycaemia have been introduced. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) receptor agonists and sodium-glucose transport protein 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have shown reductions in cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes. These new classes of agents have origins in the natural substances exendin-4 and phlorizin. Exciting developments have occurred in the field of hyperlipidaemia with the discovery of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and the development of monoclonal antibodies and other treatments to inhibit this. It is now feasible to treat most of the major cardiovascular risk factors effectively, but this is a long way from becoming a reality, in part due to the high cost of some of these novel therapies. The treatment of heart failure has also improved with the availability of the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor, valsartan/sacubitril, but the prevalence of heart failure is still increasing, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. Herbal medicines have been used for many types of heart disease for centuries. Obvious examples are digitalis from Digitalis purpurea and other foxglove species and salicylates from willows such as Salix alba. A multitude of other herbal medicines have been used or investigated for cardiovascular diseases.

This Special Issue on “Herbal Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases Prevention and Therapy” has been designed to include original research and reviews on herbal medicines that are established or under investigation for the management of cardiovascular diseases and the major risk factors for coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular conditions.

Prof. Brian Tomlinson
Prof. Paul Chan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Heart failure
  • Arrhythmias
  • Hypertension
  • Hyperlipidaemia
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Herbal medicines

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Studies to Elucidate the Effects of Furostanol Glycosides from Dioscorea deltoidea Cell Culture in a Rat Model of Endothelial Dysfunction
Molecules 2020, 25(1), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25010169 - 31 Dec 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Currently, there is no doubt surrounding a theory that the cardiotropic effects of sex hormones can be due to their direct effect on the cardiovascular system. In recent years, interest in the study of steroid glycosides has increased. We studied the effects of [...] Read more.
Currently, there is no doubt surrounding a theory that the cardiotropic effects of sex hormones can be due to their direct effect on the cardiovascular system. In recent years, interest in the study of steroid glycosides has increased. We studied the effects of furostanol glycosides (protodioscin and deltozid) from the cell culture of the Dioscorea deltoidea (laboratory code DM-05) on the physiological and biochemical parameters of vascular endothelial function in hypoestrogen-induced endothelial dysfunction after bilateral ovariectomy. It was shown that the use of DM-05 at a dose of 1 mg/kg makes it possible to prevent the development of arterial hypertension (the level of systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreases by 9.7% (p < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 8.2%), to achieve a decrease in the coefficient of endothelial dysfunction by 1.75 times against the background of a hypoestrogenic state. With DM-05, an increase in the concentration of stable nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) by 45.6% (p < 0.05) and an increase in mRNA endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression by 34.8% (p < 0.05) was established, which indicates a positive effect of furostanol glycosides on the metabolism of nitric oxide after ovariectomy. Positive dynamics in the histological structure of the heart and the abdominal aorta indicate the pronounced endothelio- and atheroprotective effects of DM-05. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Herbal Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases Prevention and Therapy)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Effects of Bilberry Supplementation on Metabolic and Cardiovascular Disease Risk
Molecules 2020, 25(7), 1653; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25071653 - 03 Apr 2020
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of interrelated conditions that is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Oxidative stress may impair normal physiological functions, leading to various illnesses. T2DM is considered to be associated with [...] Read more.
Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of interrelated conditions that is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Oxidative stress may impair normal physiological functions, leading to various illnesses. T2DM is considered to be associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and dyslipidemia, which may play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular complications, cancer and vision loss through cataracts and retinopathy. While conventional therapies are a cornerstone for the management of the major risk factors of metabolic syndrome, increasing antioxidant defense by increasing intake of antioxidant-rich foods may improve long term prospects in CVD, obesity and T2DM. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) is one of the richest natural sources of anthocyanins which give berries their red/purple/blue coloration. Anthocyanins are powerful antioxidants and are reported to play an important role in the prevention of metabolic disease and CVD as well as cancer and other conditions. This review focuses on the potential effects of bilberry supplementation on metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors. Although there is evidence to support the use of bilberry supplementation as part of a healthy diet, the potential benefits from the use of bilberry supplementation in patients with T2DM or CVD needs to be clarified in large clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Herbal Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases Prevention and Therapy)
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