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Special Issue "Biomaterials for Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Regenerative Medicine"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Margit Schulze

Department of Natural Sciences, Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences, Sankt Augustin, Germany
Website 1 | Website 2 | Website 3 | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials; drug encapsulation; drug release; regenrative medicine; scaffolds; tissue engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine covers various interdisciplinary aspects: Depending on the final application, scaffolds and drug release materials have to fulfill a number of very different, sometimes even contradictory requirements. For example, bone regeneration scaffolds are required to show sufficient mechanical stability when implanted, combined with controlled degradability, and replaced by natural bone thereby avoiding toxic degradation products.

Novel stem cell (SC) based approaches could allow individualized patient-specific solutions. However, stem cells are sensitively affected by their microenvironment (stem cell niche) which is defined by extracellular matrix properties such as elasticity and geometry. Compounds similar to the extracellular matrix (such as transforming growth factor-β, tension induced proteins, integrins and transient receptor potential) do influence and regulate cytoskeleton tension successively followed by gene expression and focal adhesion though the activation of a series of mechanical transduction events. In addition, various soluble factors (i.e., extracellular nucleotide, growth factors, and cytokines), mechanical forces (shear stress and blood pressure) and media conditions (pH, oxygen concentration) do significantly affect the stem cell fate. Scaffolds developed so far for stem cell differentiation have to be tailored to mimic the natural stem cell niche. Both, scaffold surface polarity and topography have to be adapted to the cell shape in order to support cell adhesion, proliferation and growth. Materials for encapsulation and time-controlled release of drugs supporting the SC differentiation process are required. Today, a broad variety of materials are under investigation including novel hybrids fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques, such as 3D printing or electrospinning.

Please be invited to contribute original articles, as well as survey articles specifying recent efforts in biomaterials used in stem cell-based therapies including natural polymers and related hybrids, their synthesis as well as structural analysis, in vitro and in vivo cell culture and signal transduction studies, pre-clinical and clinical trials.

Prof. Dr. Margit Schulze
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Bone regeneration
  • Drug encapsulation and release
  • Regenrative medicine
  • Scaffolds
  • Stem cells
  • Stem cell niche
  • Tissue engineering

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Biomechanical Stability and Osteogenesis in a Tibial Bone Defect Treated by Autologous Ovine Cord Blood Cells—A Pilot Study
Molecules 2019, 24(2), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24020295
Received: 12 November 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 13 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of autologous umbilical cord blood cells (USSC) on bone regeneration and biomechanical stability in an ovine tibial bone defect. Ovine USSC were harvested and characterized. After 12 months, full-size 2.0 cm mid-diaphyseal bone [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of autologous umbilical cord blood cells (USSC) on bone regeneration and biomechanical stability in an ovine tibial bone defect. Ovine USSC were harvested and characterized. After 12 months, full-size 2.0 cm mid-diaphyseal bone defects were created and stabilized by an external fixateur containing a rigidity measuring device. Defects were filled with (i) autologous USSC on hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold (test group), (ii) HA scaffold without cells (HA group), or (iii) left empty (control group). Biomechanical measures, standardized X-rays, and systemic response controls were performed regularly. After six months, bone regeneration was evaluated histomorphometrically and labeled USSC were tracked. In all groups, the torsion distance decreased over time, and radiographies showed comparable bone regeneration. The area of newly formed bone was 82.5 ± 5.5% in the control compared to 59.2 ± 13.0% in the test and 48.6 ± 2.9% in the HA group. Labeled cells could be detected in lymph nodes, liver and pancreas without any signs of tumor formation. Although biomechanical stability was reached earliest in the test group with autologous USSC on HA scaffold, the density of newly formed bone was superior in the control group without any bovine HA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Regenerative Medicine)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Bone Regeneration Induced by Strontium Folate Loaded Biohybrid Scaffolds
Molecules 2019, 24(9), 1660; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24091660
Received: 6 March 2019 / Revised: 25 April 2019 / Accepted: 26 April 2019 / Published: 27 April 2019
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Abstract
Nowadays, regenerative medicine has paid special attention to research (in vitro and in vivo) related to bone regeneration, specifically in the treatment of bone fractures or skeletal defects, which is rising worldwide and is continually demanding new developments in the use of stem [...] Read more.
Nowadays, regenerative medicine has paid special attention to research (in vitro and in vivo) related to bone regeneration, specifically in the treatment of bone fractures or skeletal defects, which is rising worldwide and is continually demanding new developments in the use of stem cells, growth factors, membranes and scaffolds based on novel nanomaterials, and their applications in patients by using advanced tools from molecular biology and tissue engineering. Strontium (Sr) is an element that has been investigated in recent years for its participation in the process of remodeling and bone formation. Based on these antecedents, this is a review about the Strontium Folate (SrFO), a recently developed non-protein based bone-promoting agent with interest in medical and pharmaceutical fields due to its improved features in comparison to current therapies for bone diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Regenerative Medicine)
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