Special Issue "Fake News in Paleoenvironmental and Paleophysiological Interpretations: Diagenetic Changes of Biominerals"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystallography and Physical Chemistry of Minerals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yannicke Dauphin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National d'Histoire Naturelle, Biodiversité, 75005 Paris, France
Interests: biomineralization; mollusc shells; coral skeletons; bone and teeth; mineralogy; organic matrices; SEM; AFM; chromatography; electrophoresis; Infrared and Raman spectroscopy; XANES; electron microprobe; fossilization and diagenesis
Prof. Dr. Jarosław Stolarski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of paleobiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Twarda 51/55, Warsaw PL‐00‐818, Poland
Interests: biomineralization; diagenesis; calcium carbonate biominerals; nano- and microstructures; fossil record

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our knowledge of biodiversity of the past comes from the remains of living organisms: fossils. Unfortunately, most often, only originally mineralized parts of the organisms, such as bones, teeth, and "shells", are preserved in the fossil record. In contrast to synthetically or geologically formed minerals, those formed by organisms (biominerals) exhibit taxa-specific composite organic–mineral structures and heterogenous biogeochemical compositions, making biominerals prone to selective diagenetic alteration and/or dissolution. Consequently, at a given fossil locality, different preservation behaviors of biominerals can be a source of significant biases in paleoenvironmental and paleobiological interpretations, including past biodiversity.

This Special Issue is dedicated to papers dealing with fossilization mechanisms of biominerals, based on analyses of modern and fossil samples, and experimental data. New data on alterations of samples in collections are also welcome.

Dr. Yannicke Dauphin
Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Stolarski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diagenesis
  • biominerals
  • alterations
  • fossilization
  • palaeoenvironment
  • palaeophysiology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Using Microstructures and Composition to Decipher the Alterations of Rodent Teeth in Modern Regurgitation Pellets—A Good News-Bad News Story
Minerals 2020, 10(1), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10010063 - 12 Jan 2020
Abstract
Rodent accumulations are widely used for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. But these accumulations are created through the activity of predators (carnivorous mammals, birds of prey), the predation and digestion of which modify the preservation of bones and teeth. The microstructures of dentine and enamel, as [...] Read more.
Rodent accumulations are widely used for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. But these accumulations are created through the activity of predators (carnivorous mammals, birds of prey), the predation and digestion of which modify the preservation of bones and teeth. The microstructures of dentine and enamel, as well as the mineralogy and composition of non-digested and digested Rodent teeth extracted from modern regurgitation pellets collected at Olduvai (Tanzania) from a bird of prey (Bubo sp.) are compared. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) and Raman spectrometry were used. The modifications induced by the digestion process are variable and depend on the tissue (enamel, dentine), tooth (incisor, molar) and the predator. For a given tissue of a tooth, the estimation of the intensity of the alteration varies according to the selected criteria. To classify the digested teeth in categories based on a single parameter to reconstruct environment is still subjective, even for modern accumulations. Moreover, to identify the interplay of diverse parameters to avoid biases in reconstructions is difficult. Full article
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