Special Issue "Ore Genesis and Metamorphism: Geochemistry, Mineralogy, and Isotopes"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Pavel A. Serov
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Geological Institute of the Kola Science Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Apatity, Russia
Interests: geochronology; isotope geochemistry; geology of ore deposits; Sm–Nd; Rb–Sr; Re–Os; U–Pb; geochemistry and petrology of ore deposits

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Active industrial development and steadily increasing demand for various types of mineral raw materials require increased rates of mineral production from deposits. The forecast and detection of genesis and multiple stages of various ore deposits is one of the main objectives in different fields of present-day geosciences. This Special Issue will focus on the latest achievements in geochemistry, mineralogy, and geochronology of ore and metamorphic complexes, their relations, and forecasting potential for the further industrial exploration. New data on the world’s major industrial deposits and published works based on theoretical research in metamorphic and ore processes are also of interest. Inter alia, overview papers on modern concepts of formation of ore complexes, their geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, and isotope characteristics are encouraged.

Dr. Pavel A. Serov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ore deposits
  • Geochemistry
  • Metamorphism
  • Metasomatic processes
  • Isotope geochemistry
  • Geochronology
  • Mineralogy
  • Metamorphic and ore minerals
  • Metallogeny

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ore Genesis of the Kuergasheng Pb–Zn Deposit, Xinjiang Province, Northwest China: Constraints from Geology, Fluid Inclusions, and H–O–C–S–Pb Isotopes
Minerals 2020, 10(7), 592; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10070592 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
The Kuergasheng Pb–Zn deposit is located in the Western Tianshan Orogen, Xinjiang Province, China. The ore bodies are mainly hosted in sandstone of the Tuosikuertawu Formation and are controlled by NW-trending faults. Three paragenetic stages were identified: early pyrite–chalcopyrite–quartz veins (stage 1), middle [...] Read more.
The Kuergasheng Pb–Zn deposit is located in the Western Tianshan Orogen, Xinjiang Province, China. The ore bodies are mainly hosted in sandstone of the Tuosikuertawu Formation and are controlled by NW-trending faults. Three paragenetic stages were identified: early pyrite–chalcopyrite–quartz veins (stage 1), middle galena–sphalerite–quartz veins (stage 2), and late sulfide-poor calcite–quartz veins (stage 3). Fluid inclusions (FIs) include liquid-rich aqueous (LV-type), vapor-rich aqueous (VL-type), halite-bearing (S-type), and monophase liquid aqueous (L-type). Homogenization temperatures for FIs from stages 1–3 are 221–251, 173–220, and 145–172 °C, respectively. Stage 1 fluids in LV-, VL-, and S-type FIs yield salinities of 6.2–9.6, 1.7–3.1, and 32.7–34.9 wt % NaCl equiv., respectively. Stage 2 fluids in LV- and S-type FIs have salinities of 5.1–7.9 and 31.9–32.1 wt % NaCl equiv., respectively. Stage 3 fluids in LV- and L-type FIs have salinities of 3.4–5.9 wt % NaCl equiv. Oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon isotopic data (δ18OH2O = –7.7 to 1.7‰, δDH2O = –99.2 to –83.1‰, δ13CH2O = –16.6 to 9.1‰) indicate that the ore-forming fluids have a hybrid origin —an initial magmatic source with input of meteoric water becoming dominant in the later stage. Sulfur and lead isotopic data for galena (δ34S = 5.6 to 6.9‰, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.002–18.273, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.598–15.643, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.097–38.209) reveal that the ore-forming materials were mainly derived from the Beidabate intrusive body and the Tuosikuertawu Formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ore Genesis and Metamorphism: Geochemistry, Mineralogy, and Isotopes)
Open AccessArticle
Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Nephrite Jade from Yinggelike Deposit, Altyn Tagh (Xinjiang, NW China)
Minerals 2020, 10(5), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10050418 - 08 May 2020
Abstract
The historic Yinggelike nephrite jade deposit in the Altyn Tagh Mountains (Xinjiang, NW China) is renowned for its gem-quality nephrite with its characteristic light-yellow to greenish-yellow hue. Despite the extraordinary gemological quality and commercial significance of the Yinggelike nephrite, little work has been [...] Read more.
The historic Yinggelike nephrite jade deposit in the Altyn Tagh Mountains (Xinjiang, NW China) is renowned for its gem-quality nephrite with its characteristic light-yellow to greenish-yellow hue. Despite the extraordinary gemological quality and commercial significance of the Yinggelike nephrite, little work has been done on this nephrite deposit, due to its geographic remoteness and inaccessibility. This contribution presents the first systematic mineralogical and geochemical studies on the Yinggelike nephrite deposit. Electron probe microanalysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry were used to measure the mineralogy, bulk-rock chemistry and stable (O and H) isotopes characteristics of samples from Yinggelike. Field investigation shows that the Yinggelike nephrite orebody occurs in the dolomitic marble near the intruding granitoids. Petrographic studies and EMPA data indicate that the nephrite is mainly composed of fine-grained tremolite, with accessory pargasite, diopside, epidote, allanite, prehnite, andesine, titanite, zircon, and calcite. Geochemical studies show that all nephrite samples have low bulk-rock Fe/(Fe + Mg) values (0.02–0.05), as well as low Cr (0.81–34.68 ppm), Co (1.10–2.91 ppm), and Ni (0.52–20.15 ppm) contents. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of most samples exhibit strong to moderate negative Eu anomalies (0.04–0.67), moderate LREE enrichments, nearly flat HREE patterns, and low ΣREE contents (2.16–11.25 ppm). The nephrite samples have δ18O and δD values of 5.3 to 7.4‰ and –74.9 to –86.7‰, respectively. The mineralogy, bulk-rock chemistry, and O–H isotope characteristics are consistent with the dolomite-related nephrite classification. Based on mineral paragenetic relationships, three possible mineral crystallization stages are recognized: (1) diopside formed by prograde metasomatism; (2) nephrite jade formed by retrograde metasomatism and replacement of Stage I anhydrous minerals; (3) hydrothermal alteration after the nephrite formation. Features of transition metal contents indicate that the color of the Yinggelike nephrite is likely to be controlled by the Fe2+, Fe3+, and Mn. Yellowish color is related to Mn and especially Fe3+, while greenish color is related to Fe2+. Our new mineralogical and geochemical results on the Yinggelike nephrite provide better constraints on the formation of other nephrite deposits in the Altyn Tagh Mountains, and can facilitate future nephrite prospecting and research in the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ore Genesis and Metamorphism: Geochemistry, Mineralogy, and Isotopes)
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