Special Issue "Mineral Formation in Pyrometamorphic Process"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Victor V. Sharygin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
V.S.Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia
Interests: pyrometamorphism; combustion metamorphism; coal fires; burned dumps; paralava; new minerals; silicate-melt and fluid inclusions in minerals; mineralogy of alkaline rocks; carbonatites; kimberlites; mineralogy of meteorites
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ellina V. Sokol
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
V.S.Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia
Interests: pyrometamorphism; combustion metamorphism; unhydrous melted rocks; coal fires; burned dumps; new minerals; cement mineralogy; mineralogical diversity; mud volcanism; geochemistry
Prof. Dr. Rodney Grapes
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Earth Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
Interests: pyrometamorphism; combustion metamorphism; metamorphic petrology; mineralogy and geochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pyrometamorphism is a common phenomenon in the Earth’s history and involves all stages of transformation of rocks (typically sediments) into high-temperature mineral associations (up to the melting stage) and their subsequent retrograde alteration under near-surface conditions. The pyrometamorphic process is very similar in both natural and anthropogenic environments.

Pyrometamorphic rocks include xenoliths of various compositions in mafic volcanic/plutonic rocks, wall rocks of mafic magma intrusion/extrusion, and sedimentary rocks that have been heated by the combustion of coal and other caustobiolith strata, flame burning in mud volcanoes, etc. Such high-temperature/low pressure transformation of sedimentary protoliths may lead to high mineral diversity, which strongly depends on the initial composition of the rocks, heating temperature, redox conditions, and other factors. For example, more than 200 minerals have been found in the unique Hatrurim Formation (Israel–Jordan), and some of them indicate very specific pyrometamorphic conditions.

This Special Issue invites contributions dealing with mineralogical and petrographic aspects in pyrometamorphic processes: the discovery of new minerals, the chemistry and geochemistry of minerals and rocks, the melting and formation of paralavas, the mineralogy of retrograde associations, fumarole mineralization in burned complexes, etc. Papers concerning the mineralogy of technogenic combustion (burned dumps of coal mines, catastrophic man-induced fires, industrial microspheres, burning of waste material, etc.) are also welcome.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect research papers devoted to recent studies of the mineralogy and petrology of pyrometamorphic rocks.

Dr. Victor V. Sharygin
Dr. Ellina V. Sokol
Prof. Dr. Rodney Grapes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Xenoliths in igneous rocks and contact metamorphism
  • Mineralogy and petrography of pyrometamorphic complexes
  • Hatrurim formation
  • Burning in mud volcanoes
  • Minerals and rocks in natural coal fires
  • Burned coal dumps
  • Fumarole mineralization during combustion metamorphism
  • New, endemic, and rare pyrometamorphic minerals
  • Silicate-melt and fluid inclusions in pyrometamorphic minerals

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Pyrometamorphic Rocks in the Molinicos Basin (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain): Insights into the Generation of Cordierite Paralavas
Minerals 2019, 9(12), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9120748 - 30 Nov 2019
Abstract
A singular thermal anomaly occurred in the Molinicos Miocene, lacustrine, intramontane basin (Betic Cordillera). This gave place to vitreous vesicular materials (paralavas) and baked rocks (clinker) inside of a sequence of marly diatomites and limestones. The chemical composition of the paralavas (SiO2 [...] Read more.
A singular thermal anomaly occurred in the Molinicos Miocene, lacustrine, intramontane basin (Betic Cordillera). This gave place to vitreous vesicular materials (paralavas) and baked rocks (clinker) inside of a sequence of marly diatomites and limestones. The chemical composition of the paralavas (SiO2 = 52–57, Al2O3 ≈ 20, Fe2O3 = 10–20, K2O + Na2O < 2.5, CaO < 4.5, and MgO < 1.5, % in weight), which is very different from typical igneous rocks, and their high-T mineralogy (cordierite, sillimanite, anorthite, mullite, and high-T silica polymorphs) suggest that they formed during a pyrometamorphic event. The occurrence of dry intervals in the lacustrine depositional system, the high Total Organic Carbon contents (>4% in weight) of dark clay layers and the existence of tectonic fractures give the right context for a combustion process. Short-term heating favoured the generation of paralavas, clinker and marbles. Thermodynamic modelling constrains the onset of melting at 870–920 °C for <10 MPa at equilibrium conditions. However, the presence of tridymite and/or cristobalite in clinker and paralavas and the compositional variation in both rock types suggests that the temperature at which first melting occurred ranged between 870 °C and 1260 °C due to melt fractionation processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Formation in Pyrometamorphic Process)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Nataliakulikite, Ca4Ti2(Fe3+,Fe2+)(Si,Fe3+,Al)O11, a New Perovskite-Supergroup Mineral from Hatrurim Basin, Negev Desert, Israel
Minerals 2019, 9(11), 700; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9110700 - 13 Nov 2019
Abstract
Nataliakulikite, Ca4Ti2(Fe3+,Fe2+)(Si,Fe3+,Al)O11, is a mineral intermediate between perovskite CaTiO3 and brownmillerite Ca2(Fe,Al)2O5. It was discovered as a minor mineral in a high-temperature pyrometamorphic larnite-gehlenite [...] Read more.
Nataliakulikite, Ca4Ti2(Fe3+,Fe2+)(Si,Fe3+,Al)O11, is a mineral intermediate between perovskite CaTiO3 and brownmillerite Ca2(Fe,Al)2O5. It was discovered as a minor mineral in a high-temperature pyrometamorphic larnite-gehlenite rock at the Nahal Morag Canyon of the Hatrurim Basin, Israel. Nataliakulikite is associated with larnite, flamite, gehlenite, magnesioferrite, Fe3+-rich perovskite, fluorapatite, barite, Hashemite, and retrograde phases (afwillite, hillebrandite, portlandite, calcite, ettringite, hydrogarnet, and other hydrated Ca-silicates). The mineral forms brown subhedral or prismatic grains (up to 20 µm) and their intergrowths (up to 50 μm). Its empirical formula (n = 47) is (Ca3.992Sr0.014U0.004)(Ti1.933Zr0.030Nb0.002) (Fe3+0.610Fe2+0.405Cr0.005Mn0.005)(Si0.447Fe3+0.337Al0.216)O11 and shows Si predominance in tetrahedral site. The unit-cell parameters (HRTEM data) and space group are: a = 5.254, b = 30.302, c = 5.488 Å, V = 873.7 Å3, Pnma, Z = 4. These dimensions and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data strongly support the structural identity between nataliakulikite and synthetic Ca4Ti2Fe3+2O11 (2CaTiO3∙Ca2Fe3+2O5), an intermediate compound in the system CaTiO3-Ca2Fe3+2O5. In general, this mineral is a Si-Fe2+-rich natural analog of synthetic Ca4Ti2Fe3+2O11. The X-ray powder diffraction data (CuKα -radiation), calculated from unit-cell dimensions, show the strongest lines {d [Å], (Icalc)} at: 2.681(100), 1.898(30), 2.627(26), 2.744(23), 1.894(22), 15.151(19), 1.572(14), 3.795(8). The calculated density is 4.006 g/cm3. The crystal structure of nataliakulikite has not been refined because of small sizes of grains. The Raman spectrum shows strong bands at 128, 223, 274, 562, and 790 cm−1. Nataliakulikite from the Hatrurim Basin crystallized under the conditions of combustion metamorphism at high temperatures (1160–1200 °C) and low pressures (HT-region of the spurrite-merwinite facies). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Formation in Pyrometamorphic Process)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

  1.  Dr. Dmitriy Belakovskiy et al.
  2.  Dr. Lutz Reinhardt et al.
  3.  Dr. Justyna Ciesielczuk et al.
  4.  Dr. Fernando Ortega Gutierrez et al.
  5.  Dr. Bin Chen et al.
Back to TopTop