Special Issue "Biosorption and Biomineralization in Metal Removal"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Takehiko Tsuruta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Life and Environmental Science, Hachinohe Institute of Technology, Hachinohe, Japan
Interests: biosorption; biomineralization; metal removal; metal separation; metal recovery; microorganism; biomass

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosorption is a process that utilizes biological materials as adsorbents, and this method has been studied by several researchers as an alternative technique to conventional methods for heavy metal removal from wastewater. On the other hand, biomineralization is the process by which living forms influence the precipitation of mineral materials. The process creates heterogeneous accumulations, composites composed of biologic (or organic) and inorganic compounds, with nonhomogeneous distributions that reflect the environment in which they form. Biosorption and biomineralizaton of some metals are often occurred in the metal removal process using microorganisms. This Special Issue aims to publish papers with appropriate examples that confirm the important role of the metal removal by biosorption and biomineralization in several types of metal ions from the aqueous system. Papers providing experimental data to evaluate the metal removal by biosorption and biomineralization are also welcome.

Prof. Takehiko Tsuruta
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biosorption
  • biomineralization
  • metal removal
  • microorganism

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Recovery of Copper from Leached Tailing Solutions by Biosorption
Minerals 2020, 10(2), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10020158 - 12 Feb 2020
Abstract
Due to the progressive fall of the ore grades and the increasingly refractory composition of minerals, concentrating plants have increased which has led to an increase in the generation of tailings. Tailings, especially those obtained in the past, have remaining copper and other [...] Read more.
Due to the progressive fall of the ore grades and the increasingly refractory composition of minerals, concentrating plants have increased which has led to an increase in the generation of tailings. Tailings, especially those obtained in the past, have remaining copper and other valuable species in quantities that can potentially be recovered, such as gold, silver, vanadium, and rare earth elements which transforms this abundant waste into a potential source of precious or strategic metals for secondary mining. One of the techniques of solid–liquid separation that processes solutions with low concentrations of metals corresponds to adsorption, and more recently biosorption, which is based on the use of biological matrices that do not constitute an environmental liability after application. Biosorption occurs as a consequence of the wide variety of active functional groups present in different types of biomass. Bacterial, fungal, plant, and algal biomasses have been described as biosorbents, mainly for the treatment of diluted and simple solutions. This work aims to recover copper from leached tailings using biomass of the red algae Gracilaria chilensis as a biosorbent. The tailing samples were taken from an abandoned deposit, in the north of Chile, and after an acid leaching copper was biosorbed, kinetics of adsorption and the equilibrium isotherms were studied, applying the Freundlich and Langmuir models. Operational parameters such as adsorbent dose, pH, and initial metal concentration were studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosorption and Biomineralization in Metal Removal)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Bio-Precipitation of Calcium and Magnesium Ions through Extracellular and Intracellular Process Induced by Bacillus Licheniformis SRB2
Minerals 2019, 9(9), 526; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090526 - 30 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Removal of calcium and magnesium ions through biomineralization induced by bacteria has been proven to be an effective and environmentally friendly method to improve water quality, but the process and mechanism are far from fully understood. In this study, a newly isolated probiotic [...] Read more.
Removal of calcium and magnesium ions through biomineralization induced by bacteria has been proven to be an effective and environmentally friendly method to improve water quality, but the process and mechanism are far from fully understood. In this study, a newly isolated probiotic Bacillus licheniformis SRB2 (GenBank: KM884945.1) was used to induce the bio-precipitation of calcium and magnesium at various Mg/Ca molar ratios (0, 6, 8, 10, and 12) in medium with 30 g L−1 sodium chloride. Due to the increasing pH and HCO3 and CO32− concentrations caused by NH3 and carbonic anhydrase, about 98% Ca2+ and 50% Mg2+ were precipitated in 12 days. The pathways of bio-precipitation include extracellular and intracellular processes. Biominerals with more negative δ13C values (−16‰ to −18‰) were formed including calcite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite, and nesquehonite with preferred orientation. The nucleation on extracellular polymeric substances was controlled by the negatively charged amino acids and organic functional groups. The intracellular amorphous inclusions containing calcium and magnesium also contributed to the bio-precipitation. This study reveals the process and mechanism of microbial desalination for the removal of calcium and magnesium, and provides some references to explain the formation of the nesquehonite and other carbonate minerals in a natural and ancient earth surface environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosorption and Biomineralization in Metal Removal)
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