Microbiome and Microbiota in Indoor Spaces: Communities, Control and Potential Hazards

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2350

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Biology and Environment, Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences (CITAB), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: microbial ecology; environment microbiology; biodegradation; bioremediation; natural antibiotics; antifungals
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Indoor spaces are very important for human civilization. From the caves that sheltered our ancestors to the space station, we live and work in these environments for most of our lives. Therefore, microbial communities, their diversity and concentration of populations and their metabolism and physiology are important for our well-being. Additionally, in the case of industries, the control of microorganisms is essential for quality production. The type of activity, frequency, environmental factors and climate determine the microbial diversity of these environments.

The present Special Issue will display the state of the art on the latest results and developments in microbial communities and functions in indoor environments, their risks for users and/or for production and control methods.

This Special Issue welcomes research articles, reviews and communications on the following topics:

  • Microbial communities in natural and artificial indoor spaces (e.g., caves, (agro)-industrial plants, hospitals, airports, houses, kindergartens, schools, nursing homes, prisons, ships, mines, etc.);
  • Microbial ecology of natural and artificial indoor environments;
  • Physiology and metabolism of dominant microbial species in indoor environments;
  • Indoor–outdoor relationships;
  • Methods for studying microorganisms on indoor surfaces and in indoor air;
  • Potential hazards of indoor microorganisms to users and/or production;
  • Climate and indoor microorganisms;
  • Microbial control methods: present and future directions.

Dr. Ana C. Sampaio
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • microbiome
  • microbiota
  • metabolism
  • microbial toxins
  • microbial hazards
  • microbial control
  • control methods

Published Papers (2 papers)

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16 pages, 536 KiB  
Article
Effects of Anthropogenic Disturbance and Seasonal Variation on Aerobiota in Highly Visited Show Caves in Slovenia
by Rok Tomazin, Saša Simčič, Sanja Stopinšek, Andreja Nataša Kopitar, Andreja Kukec, Tadeja Matos and Janez Mulec
Microorganisms 2023, 11(10), 2381; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11102381 - 23 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 950
Abstract
Aerosols in caves are natural tracers and, together with climatic parameters, provide a detailed insight into atmospheric conditions, responses to climatic changes and anthropogenic influences in caves. Microbiological air monitoring in show caves is becoming increasingly useful to understand changes in cave ecosystems [...] Read more.
Aerosols in caves are natural tracers and, together with climatic parameters, provide a detailed insight into atmospheric conditions, responses to climatic changes and anthropogenic influences in caves. Microbiological air monitoring in show caves is becoming increasingly useful to understand changes in cave ecosystems and to implement and review measures for sustainable cave use and tourism development. In 2017 and 2018, air along tourist trails in caves Postojnska jama and Škocjanske jame (Slovenia) was sampled before and after tourist visits. Samples were analysed using culture-dependent methods, flow cytometry, detection of β-D-glucan and lipopolysaccharide and compared with CO2 and temperature data to measure anthropogenic influences and seasonality on aerobiota. While the presence of tourists significantly increased concentrations of airborne microorganisms (p < 0.05), β-D-glucan and CO2 did not show such a trend and were more dependent on seasonal changes. Locally, concentrations of cultivable microorganisms above 1000 CFU/m3 were detected, which could have negative effects on the autochthonous microbiota and possibly on human health. A mixture of bacteria typically associated with humans was found in the air and identified with MALDI-TOF MS. Using MALDI-TOF MS, we achieved a 69.6% success rate in identification. Micrococcus luteus, Streptococcus mitis, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Moraxella spp. were recognized as good indicators of cave anthropisation. Full article
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20 pages, 3641 KiB  
Article
Microbiota Profiling on Veterinary Faculty Restroom Surfaces and Source Tracking
by Hiba Jabri, Simone Krings, Papa Abdoulaye Fall, Denis Baurain, Georges Daube and Bernard Taminiau
Microorganisms 2023, 11(8), 2053; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11082053 - 10 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1007
Abstract
In this study, we aimed to develop a comprehensive microbial source amplicon database tailored for source tracking in veterinary settings. We rigorously tested our locally curated source tracking database by selecting a frequently accessed environment by veterinary students and veterinarians. By exploring the [...] Read more.
In this study, we aimed to develop a comprehensive microbial source amplicon database tailored for source tracking in veterinary settings. We rigorously tested our locally curated source tracking database by selecting a frequently accessed environment by veterinary students and veterinarians. By exploring the composition of resident microbiota and identifying potential sources of contamination, including animals, the environment, and human beings, we aimed to provide valuable insights into the dynamics of microbial transmission within veterinary facilities. The 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing was used to determine the bacterial taxonomic profiles of restroom surfaces. Bacterial sources were identified by linking our metadata-enriched local database to the microbiota profiling analysis using high-quality sequences. Microbiota profiling shows the dominance of four phyla: Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. If the restroom cleaning process did not appear to impact microbiota composition, significant differences regarding bacterial distribution were observed between male and female users in different sampling campaigns. Combining 16S rDNA profiling to our specific sources labeling pipeline, we found aquatic and human sources were the primary environment keywords in our campaigns. The probable presence of known animal sources (bovids, insects, equids, suids…) associated with bacterial genera such as Chryseobacterium, Bergeyella, Fibrobacter, and Syntrophococcus was also involved in restroom surfaces, emphasizing the proximity between these restrooms and the exchange of bacteria between people involved in animals handling. To summarize, we have demonstrated that DNA sequence-based source tracking may be integrated with high-throughput bacterial community analysis to enrich microbial investigation of potential bacterial contamination sources, especially for little known or poorly identified taxa. However, more research is needed to determine the tool’s utility in other applications. Full article
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