Special Issue "Miniature Mobile Imaging and Sensing Devices"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "A:Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Qingshan Wei

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; North Carolina State University; Raleigh, NC 27695-7905, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-919-515-3154
Interests: point-of-care diagnostics; imaging and sensing devices; lab on a chip; DNA analysis; mobile health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Imaging and sensing tools are indispensable for scientific discovery and innovation. The field is undergoing a profound transformation. The price and size of image sensors, light sources, and optical components have been significantly reduced. The revolution in smartphones and other consumer digital devices have placed low-cost, high-quality imaging systems in the hands of billions of people. Device fabrication and prototyping is becoming increasingly inexpensive and faster than ever with 3D printing. With these trends, various cost-effective, field-portable, and easy-to-use imaging and sensing tools are emerging. Advanced microscopy and spectroscopy measurements can now be rapidly performed on palm-size or wearable devices. Using such miniature devices, personal health can be monitored in real time and continuous fashion via consumer-level health measurement and diagnostic platforms, especially useful in the developing world where diagnostic technologies are often both limited and expensive. This Special Issue seeks to showcase recent development of mobile imaging and sensing technologies and their applications for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, chemical/biological sensing, and environmental monitoring. It aims to form a collection of original research papers, short communications, and review articles that focus on novel methodological developments of miniaturized microscopes, mobile phone-based devices, lab-on-a-chip microscopes, handheld/wearable sensors, and utilization of such systems for a variety of promising detection and sensing applications.

Dr. Qingshan Wei
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Imaging and sensing devices
  • Miniature microscopes
  • Smartphone microscopy
  • Wearable sensors
  • Point-of-care diagnostics
  • Mobile health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Development and Validation of a Smartphone-Based Near-Infrared Optical Imaging Device to Measure Physiological Changes In-Vivo
Micromachines 2019, 10(3), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10030180
Received: 16 January 2019 / Revised: 23 February 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 9 March 2019
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Abstract
Smartphone-based technologies for medical imaging purposes are limited, especially when it involves the measurement of physiological information of the tissues. Herein, a smartphone-based near-infrared (NIR) imaging device was developed to measure physiological changes in tissues across a wide area and without contact. A [...] Read more.
Smartphone-based technologies for medical imaging purposes are limited, especially when it involves the measurement of physiological information of the tissues. Herein, a smartphone-based near-infrared (NIR) imaging device was developed to measure physiological changes in tissues across a wide area and without contact. A custom attachment containing multiple multi-wavelength LED light sources (690, 800, and 840 nm; and <4 mW of optical power per LED), source driver, and optical filters and lenses was clipped onto a smartphone that served as the detector during data acquisition. The ability of the device to measure physiological changes was validated via occlusion studies on control subjects. Noise removal techniques using singular value decomposition algorithms effectively removed surface noise and distinctly differentiated the physiological changes in response to occlusion. In the long term, the developed smartphone-based NIR imaging device with capabilities to capture physiological changes will be a great low-cost alternative for clinicians and eventually for patients with chronic ulcers and bed sores, and/or in pre-screening for potential ulcers in diabetic subjects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniature Mobile Imaging and Sensing Devices)
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Open AccessArticle Handheld Inkjet Printing Paper Chip Based Smart Tetracycline Detector
Micromachines 2019, 10(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10010027
Received: 25 November 2018 / Revised: 20 December 2018 / Accepted: 27 December 2018 / Published: 1 January 2019
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Abstract
Tetracycline is widely used as medicine for disease treatments and additives in animal feeding. Unfortunately, the abuse of tetracycline inevitably causes tetracycline residue in animal-origin foods. Though classical methods can detect tetracycline in high sensitivity and precision, they often rely on huge and [...] Read more.
Tetracycline is widely used as medicine for disease treatments and additives in animal feeding. Unfortunately, the abuse of tetracycline inevitably causes tetracycline residue in animal-origin foods. Though classical methods can detect tetracycline in high sensitivity and precision, they often rely on huge and expensive setups as well as complicated and time-consuming operations, limiting their applications in rapid and on-site detection. Here, we propose a handheld inkjet printing paper chip based smart tetracycline detector: tetracycline can be determined by inkjet printing prepared paper chip based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the advantages of high sensitivity, excellent specificity and low cost; moreover, a smartphone based paper chip reader and application is designed for automatically determining tetracycline with simple operations, high precision and fast speed. The smart tetracycline detector with a compact size of 154 mm × 80 mm × 50 mm and self-supplied internal power can reach a rather low detection limit of ~0.05 ng/mL, as proved by practical measurements. It is believed the proposed handheld inkjet printing paper chip based smart tetracycline detector is a potential tool in antibiotic sensing for routine uses at home and on-site detection in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniature Mobile Imaging and Sensing Devices)
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Open AccessArticle A Simple Imaging Device for Fluorescence-Relevant Applications
Micromachines 2018, 9(8), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9080418
Received: 28 June 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 18 August 2018 / Published: 20 August 2018
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Abstract
This article unveiled the development of an inexpensive, lightweight, easy-to-use, and portable fluorescence imaging device for paper-based analytical applications. We used commercial fluorescent dyes, as proof of concept, to verify the feasibility of our fluorescence imaging device for bioanalysis. This approach may provide [...] Read more.
This article unveiled the development of an inexpensive, lightweight, easy-to-use, and portable fluorescence imaging device for paper-based analytical applications. We used commercial fluorescent dyes, as proof of concept, to verify the feasibility of our fluorescence imaging device for bioanalysis. This approach may provide an alternative method for nucleotide detection and semen analysis, using a miniaturized fluorescence reader that is more compact and portable than conventional analytical equipment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniature Mobile Imaging and Sensing Devices)
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