Special Issue "Advanced Laser Bio-Printing"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B:Biology and Biomedicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021) | Viewed by 5251

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Christos Boutopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, 5690 Rosemont Blvd, Montreal, QC H1T 2H2, Canada
Interests: laser bioprinting; nano-biophotonics; fiber-based optical coherence tomography
Prof. Dr. Ioanna Zergioti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS), National Technical University of Athens, Heroon Polytehneiou 9, 15780 Athens, Greece
Interests: laser-induced forward transfer; dual-laser bioprinting; laser materials microprocessing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Laser bio-printing was introduced 17 years ago, and has since evolved into a powerful technology, facilitating biosensing, tissue engineering, and drug screening applications. Today, laser bioprinting has been widely adapted by many laboratories for the 2D and 3D printing of biomaterials (e.g., cells, proteins, oligonucleotides, growth factors). Laser-induced forward transfer and its variations are common implementations of laser bio-printing which share the same working principle: the use of laser pulses to transfer biomaterials in liquid or solid phase from a donor to a receiving substrate in a controlled manner. Unlike conventional bio-printers (i.e., inkjet, micro-extrusion), laser bioprinting does not use a nozzle. This allows for broader bioink printability and for superior printing resolution compared to conventional bioprinters. Moreover, a unique feature in laser bioprinting is the ability to perform in-situ post-printing laser processing (e.g., photoactivation and photopolymerization) of biomaterials using a dual laser beam approach. Despite enormous research efforts and recent commercialization, several challenges are open to the community, including multiscale and multi-bioink printing. In this light, this Special Issue seeks to highlight research papers and reviews that focus on i) the development and/or modeling of innovative laser bioprinting approaches and ii) their biomedical applications.

Dr. Christos Boutopoulos
Prof. Dr. Ioanna Zergioti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Laser-induced forward transfer
  • Laser flow focusing
  • Laser-assisted bioprinting
  • Laser-induced backward transfer
  • Laser-induced side transfer
  • Tissue engineering
  • Bioprinting
  • Dual laser bioprinting

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Capillary-like Formations of Endothelial Cells in Defined Patterns Generated by Laser Bioprinting
Micromachines 2021, 12(12), 1538; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12121538 - 10 Dec 2021
Viewed by 761
Abstract
Bioprinting is seen as a promising technique for tissue engineering, with hopes of one day being able to produce whole organs. However, thick tissue requires a functional vascular network, which naturally contains vessels of various sizes, down to capillaries of ~10 µm in [...] Read more.
Bioprinting is seen as a promising technique for tissue engineering, with hopes of one day being able to produce whole organs. However, thick tissue requires a functional vascular network, which naturally contains vessels of various sizes, down to capillaries of ~10 µm in diameter, often spaced less than 200 µm apart. If such thick tissues are to be printed, the vasculature would likely need to be printed at the same time, including the capillaries. While there are many approaches in tissue engineering to produce larger vessels in a defined manner, the small capillaries usually arise only in random patterns by sprouting from the larger vessels or from randomly distributed endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether the small capillaries could also be printed in predefined patterns. For this purpose, we used a laser-based bioprinting technique that allows for the combination of high resolution and high cell density. Our aim was to achieve the formation of closed tubular structures with lumina by laser-printed endothelial cells along the printed patterns on a surface and in bioprinted tissue. This study shows that such capillaries are directly printable; however, persistence of the printed tubular structures was achieved only in tissue with external stimulation by other cell types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Laser Bio-Printing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Parametric Study of Jet/Droplet Formation Process during LIFT Printing of Living Cell-Laden Bioink
Micromachines 2021, 12(11), 1408; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12111408 - 16 Nov 2021
Viewed by 562
Abstract
Bioprinting offers great potential for the fabrication of three-dimensional living tissues by the precise layer-by-layer printing of biological materials, including living cells and cell-laden hydrogels. The laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of cell-laden bioinks is one of the most promising laser-printing technologies enabling biofabrication. [...] Read more.
Bioprinting offers great potential for the fabrication of three-dimensional living tissues by the precise layer-by-layer printing of biological materials, including living cells and cell-laden hydrogels. The laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of cell-laden bioinks is one of the most promising laser-printing technologies enabling biofabrication. However, for it to be a viable bioprinting technology, bioink printability must be carefully examined. In this study, we used a time-resolved imaging system to study the cell-laden bioink droplet formation process in terms of the droplet size, velocity, and traveling distance. For this purpose, the bioinks were prepared using breast cancer cells with different cell concentrations to evaluate the effect of the cell concentration on the droplet formation process and the survival of the cells after printing. These bioinks were compared with cell-free bioinks under the same printing conditions to understand the effect of the particle physical properties on the droplet formation procedure. The morphology of the printed droplets indicated that it is possible to print uniform droplets for a wide range of cell concentrations. Overall, it is concluded that the laser fluence and the distance of the donor–receiver substrates play an important role in the printing impingement type; consequently, a careful adjustment of these parameters can lead to high-quality printing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Laser Bio-Printing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Extending Single Cell Bioprinting from Femtosecond to Picosecond Laser Pulse Durations
Micromachines 2021, 12(10), 1172; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12101172 - 29 Sep 2021
Viewed by 732
Abstract
Femtosecond laser pulses have been successfully used for film-free single-cell bioprinting, enabling precise and efficient selection and positioning of individual mammalian cells from a complex cell mixture (based on morphology or fluorescence) onto a 2D target substrate or a 3D pre-processed scaffold. In [...] Read more.
Femtosecond laser pulses have been successfully used for film-free single-cell bioprinting, enabling precise and efficient selection and positioning of individual mammalian cells from a complex cell mixture (based on morphology or fluorescence) onto a 2D target substrate or a 3D pre-processed scaffold. In order to evaluate the effects of higher pulse durations on the bioprinting process, we investigated cavitation bubble and jet dynamics in the femto- and picosecond regime. By increasing the laser pulse duration from 600 fs to 14.1 ps, less energy is deposited in the hydrogel for the cavitation bubble expansion, resulting in less kinetic energy for the jet propagation with a slower jet velocity. Under appropriate conditions, single cells can be reliably transferred with a cell survival rate after transfer above 95% through the entire pulse duration range. More cost efficient and compact laser sources with pulse durations in the picosecond range could be used for film-free bioprinting and single-cell transfer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Laser Bio-Printing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Bioprinting of Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) Neurons Using Laser-Induced Side Transfer (LIST)
Micromachines 2021, 12(8), 865; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12080865 - 23 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2585
Abstract
Cell bioprinting technologies aim to fabricate tissuelike constructs by delivering biomaterials layer-by-layer. Bioprinted constructs can reduce the use of animals in drug development and hold promise for addressing the shortage of organs for transplants. Here, we sought to validate the feasibility of bioprinting [...] Read more.
Cell bioprinting technologies aim to fabricate tissuelike constructs by delivering biomaterials layer-by-layer. Bioprinted constructs can reduce the use of animals in drug development and hold promise for addressing the shortage of organs for transplants. Here, we sought to validate the feasibility of bioprinting primary adult sensory neurons using a newly developed laser-assisted cell bioprinting technology, known as Laser-Induced Side Transfer (LIST). We used dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG; cell bodies of somatosensory neurons) to prepare our bioink. DRG-laden- droplets were printed on fibrin-coated coverslips and their viability, calcium kinetics, neuropeptides release, and neurite outgrowth were measured. The transcriptome of the neurons was sequenced. We found that LIST-printed neurons maintain high viability (Printed: 86%, Control: 87% on average) and their capacity to release neuropeptides (Printed CGRP: 130 pg/mL, Control CGRP: 146 pg/mL). In addition, LIST-printed neurons do not show differences in the expressed genes compared to control neurons. However, in printed neurons, we found compromised neurite outgrowth and lower sensitivity to the ligand of the TRPV1 channel, capsaicin. In conclusion, LIST-printed neurons maintain high viability and marginal functionality losses. Overall, this work paves the way for bioprinting functional 2D neuron assays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Laser Bio-Printing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop