Advanced Manufacturing of Micro- and Nanotextured Polymer Surfaces

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "D3: 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 14712

Special Issue Editors

School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University College Dublin, D04 V1W8 Dublin, Ireland
Interests: polymer micro/nano manufacturing; advanced manufacturing of precision micro/nano moulds; atomic and close-to-atomic scale manufacturing; microfluidics and functional surfaces; diagnostics and genetic drug synthesis
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Guest Editor
Institute of Polymer Nanotechnology, FHNW University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Windisch, Switzerland
Interests: micro- and nanostructuring of polymer surfaces; industrial replication technologies; functional additives; fillers; nanocomposites
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global trend towards miniaturization has been expanding into many areas of human life, enabled by the realization of ever-smaller mechanical, optical, medical, and electronic products. Due to comparably low cost and industrial up-scalability, polymer materials are favorable for the production of surface micro- and nanoscale surface topographies for integrated systems, such as microfluidic devices, micro-optics, and functional surfaces. Polymer micro/nano manufacturing technologies are broadly composed of molding and forming processes as well as additive and subtractive manufacturing processes.

This Special Issue is dedicated to recent advances in research and development within the field of advanced manufacturing of micro- and nanotextured polymer surfaces. We are looking for papers that report recent findings and developments in manufacturing technologies and applications for polymeric micro- and nanoscale surface topographies.

Dr. Nan Zhang
Prof. Dr. Per Magnus Kristiansen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microinjection moulding
  • Micro hot embossing
  • Nanoimprinting
  • Roll-to-roll hot embossing/imprinting
  • 3D printing
  • Micro additive manufacturing
  • Process modeling and simulation
  • Microfluidics
  • Micro-optics
  • Functional surfaces
  • Biomedical devices
  • Sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 4649 KiB  
Article
Simulating the Residual Layer Thickness in Roll-to-Plate Nanoimprinting with Tensioned Webs
by Jelle Snieder, Marc Dielen and Ron A. J. van Ostayen
Micromachines 2022, 13(3), 461; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi13030461 - 18 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2691
Abstract
Roll-to-plate nanoimprinting with flexible stamps is a fabrication method to pattern large-area substrates with micro- and nanotextures. The imprint consists of the preferred texture on top of a residual layer, of which the thickness and uniformity is critical for many applications. In this [...] Read more.
Roll-to-plate nanoimprinting with flexible stamps is a fabrication method to pattern large-area substrates with micro- and nanotextures. The imprint consists of the preferred texture on top of a residual layer, of which the thickness and uniformity is critical for many applications. In this work, a numerical model is developed to predict the residual layer thickness (RLT) as a function of the imprint parameters. The model is based on elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) theory, which combines lubrication theory for the pressure build-up in the resin film, with linear elasticity theory for the elastic deformation of the roller material. The model is extended with inextensible cylindrical shell theory to capture the effect of the flexible stamp, which is treated as a tensioned web. The results show that an increase in the tension of the web increases the effective stiffness of the roller, resulting in a reduction in the RLT. The numerical results are validated with layer height measurements from flat layer imprints. It is shown that the simulated minimum layer height corresponds very well with the experimental results for a wide range of resin viscosities, imprint velocities, and imprint loads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing of Micro- and Nanotextured Polymer Surfaces)
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Review

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35 pages, 12952 KiB  
Review
A Review of Microinjection Moulding of Polymeric Micro Devices
by Honggang Zhang, Haibin Liu and Nan Zhang
Micromachines 2022, 13(9), 1530; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi13091530 - 16 Sep 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2755
Abstract
Polymeric micro devices are gaining huge market potential in broad areas of medical devices, diagnostic devices, drug delivery, and optical applications. Current research is focusing on developing functional polymeric micro devices on a mass-production scale. Microinjection moulding is a promising technique suitable for [...] Read more.
Polymeric micro devices are gaining huge market potential in broad areas of medical devices, diagnostic devices, drug delivery, and optical applications. Current research is focusing on developing functional polymeric micro devices on a mass-production scale. Microinjection moulding is a promising technique suitable for fabricating polymeric micro devices. This review aims to summarise the primary achievements that have been achieved in various aspects of microinjection moulding of polymer micro devices, consisting of micro parts and micro surface structures. The relationships of the machine, process, rheology, tooling, micro/nanoscale replication, morphology, properties, and typical applications are reviewed in detail. Finally, a conclusion and challenges are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing of Micro- and Nanotextured Polymer Surfaces)
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35 pages, 9068 KiB  
Review
Electropolishing and Shaping of Micro-Scale Metallic Features
by Sana Zaki, Nan Zhang and Michael D. Gilchrist
Micromachines 2022, 13(3), 468; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi13030468 - 18 Mar 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 8025
Abstract
Electropolishing (EP) is most widely used as a metal finishing process. It is a non-contact electrochemical process that can clean, passivate, deburr, brighten, and improve the biocompatibility of surfaces. However, there is clear potential for it to be used to shape and form [...] Read more.
Electropolishing (EP) is most widely used as a metal finishing process. It is a non-contact electrochemical process that can clean, passivate, deburr, brighten, and improve the biocompatibility of surfaces. However, there is clear potential for it to be used to shape and form the topology of micro-scale surface features, such as those found on the micro-applications of additively manufactured (AM) parts, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMs), biomedical stents, and artificial implants. This review focuses on the fundamental principles of electrochemical polishing, the associated process parameters (voltage, current density, electrolytes, electrode gap, and time), and the increasing demand for using environmentally sustainable electrolytes and micro-scale applications. A summary of other micro-fabrication processes, including micro-milling, micro-electric discharge machining (EDM), laser polishing/ablation, lithography (LIGA), electrochemical etching (MacEtch), and reactive ion etching (RIE), are discussed and compared with EP. However, those processes have tool size, stress, wear, and structural integrity limitations for micro-structures. Hence, electropolishing offers two-fold benefits of material removal from the metal, resulting in a smooth and bright surface, along with the ability to shape/form micro-scale features, which makes the process particularly attractive for precision engineering applications.zx3. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing of Micro- and Nanotextured Polymer Surfaces)
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