Special Issue "Gut Metabolism of Natural Products"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jaehong Han

Metalloenzyme Research Group and Department of Plant Science and Biotechnology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Biotransformation, Natural Products, Metabolite, Flavonoids, Mechanism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the increasing interest in and significance of the gut metabolism in human health, a Special Issue of Metabolites has been launched on the topic of the “Gut Metabolism of Natural Products”. I would like to invite all those working on the gut metabolism of bioactive compounds from natural products and foods at the molecular level to submit their recent progress, significant discoveries, and insightful reviews. The areas of research covered include the intestinal bacterial metabolism of natural compounds, structural characterization of gut metabolites produced by in vivo or in vitro studies, chemical synthesis, and the pharmacokinetic study of gut metabolites. Works on the biological activity of gut metabolites are especially welcome.

Prof. Dr. Jaehong Han
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Gut metabolism
  • Natural products
  • Intestinal bacteria
  • Biotransformation
  • Biological activity
  • Gut metabolites

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Role of Intestinal Microbiota in Metabolism of Gastrodin In Vitro and In Vivo
Metabolites 2019, 9(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9040069
Received: 9 March 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
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Abstract
Alteration in the number and composition of intestinal microbiota affects the metabolism of several xenobiotics. Gastrodin, isolated from Gastrodia elata, is prone to be hydrolyzed by intestinal microbiota. In the present study, the role of intestinal microbiota in gastrodin metabolism was investigated in [...] Read more.
Alteration in the number and composition of intestinal microbiota affects the metabolism of several xenobiotics. Gastrodin, isolated from Gastrodia elata, is prone to be hydrolyzed by intestinal microbiota. In the present study, the role of intestinal microbiota in gastrodin metabolism was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Gastrodin was incubated in an anaerobic condition with intestinal contents prepared from vehicle- and antibiotics-treated rats and the disappearance of gastrodin and formation of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (4-HBA) was measured by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS). The results showed that almost all gastrodin incubated with control intestinal contents was metabolized to its aglycone in time- and concentration-dependent manners. In contrast, much less formation of 4-HBA was detected in intestinal contents from antibiotics-treated rats. Subsequently, in vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed that the antibiotic pretreatment of rats significantly affected the metabolism of gastrodin to 4-HBA. When administered orally, gastrodin was rapidly absorbed rapidly into plasma, metabolized to 4-HBA, and disappeared from the body within six hours. Interestingly, the pharmacokinetic parameters of 4-HBA were changed remarkably in antibiotics-treated rats, compared to control rats. The results clearly indicated that the antibiotics treatment of rats suppressed the ability of intestinal microbiota to metabolize gastrodin to 4-HBA and that, thereby, the pharmacodynamic action was significantly modulated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Metabolism of Natural Products)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Early Intervention with Maternal Fecal Microbiota and Antibiotics on the Gut Microbiota and Metabolite Profiles of Piglets
Metabolites 2018, 8(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo8040089
Received: 6 November 2018 / Revised: 29 November 2018 / Accepted: 2 December 2018 / Published: 6 December 2018
PDF Full-text (3286 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We investigated the effects of early intervention with maternal fecal microbiota and antibiotics on gut microbiota and the metabolites. Five litters of healthy neonatal piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire, nine piglets in each litter) were used. Piglets in each litter were orally [...] Read more.
We investigated the effects of early intervention with maternal fecal microbiota and antibiotics on gut microbiota and the metabolites. Five litters of healthy neonatal piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire, nine piglets in each litter) were used. Piglets in each litter were orally treated with saline (CO), amoxicillin treatment (AM), or maternal fecal microbiota transplantation (MFMT) on days 1–6, with three piglets in each treatment. Results were compared to the CO group. MFMT decreased the relative abundances of Clostridium sensu stricto and Parabacteroides in the colon on day 7, whereas the abundance of Blautia increased, and the abundance of Corynebacterium in the stomach reduced on day 21. AM reduced the abundance of Arcanobacterium in the stomach on day 7 and reduced the abundances of Streptococcus and Lachnoclostridium in the ileum and colon on day 21, respectively. The metabolite profile indicated that MFMT markedly influenced carbohydrate metabolism and amino acid (AA) metabolism on day 7. On day 21, carbohydrate metabolism and AA metabolism were affected by AM. The results suggest that MFMT and AM discriminatively modulate gastrointestinal microflora and alter the colonic metabolic profiles of piglets and show different effects in the long-term. MFMT showed a location-specific influence on the gastrointestinal microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Metabolism of Natural Products)
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