Special Issue "Membrane Systems for Tissue Engineering 2020"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375). This special issue belongs to the section "Membranes in Life Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sabrina Morelli
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Institute on Membrane Technology, National Research Council of Italy, ITM-CNR c/o University of Calabria, Via P.Bucci, cubo 17/C, I-87036 Rende (CS) Italy
Interests: preparation and Characterization of polymeric membrane systems for tissue engineering; regenerative medicine and bioartificial organs; fabrication of advanced membrane systems for creating 3D tissue models for tissue repair, pharmacological screening, and disease modeling
Prof. Dr. Shih-Jung Liu
Website
Guest Editor
Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University Adjunct Professor, Orthopedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan
Interests: bioabsorbable medical devices; drug delivery; tissue engineering; nanofibers; core-shell microspheres
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Loredana De Bartolo
Website
Guest Editor
Institute on Membrane Technology, National Research Council of Italy, ITM-CNR c/o University of Calabria, via P. Bucci cubo 17/C, I-87036 Rende (CS) Italy
Interests: membrane science and engineering; cell–membrane interactions; design and development of membrane bioreactors; bioartificial organs and in vitro tools; development of membranes for different tissues and organs (e.g., liver, neurons, skin, bone, mesenchymal stem cells, etc)
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, in the field of tissue engineering, membrane-based approaches provide advanced systems that are able to mimic the native physiological environment of healthy tissues and, consequently, regulate cell behavior and support the regeneration of injured tissues/organs. A variety of membrane systems, including micro/nanofibers and scaffolds made of natural, synthetic or blend polymers, and bioreactors, have been widely investigated for engineering a range of tissues (i.e., liver, kidney, bone, nerve, skin, etc.).

For the design and fabrication of advanced tissue-engineered constructs, membrane properties including morphological, mechanical, physico-chemical, and transport and electrical properties, are key elements in dictating cellular behavior and in controlling new tissue formation. In this context, a challenging issue is to provide biofunctionality—mechanical and topographical features of the native target tissue within the membrane system to improve interactions with cells for greater repair and regeneration.

To date, membrane-based systems also have great potential as investigational tools in preclinical research, contributing to expand the available in vitro devices for drug testing applications and modeling of human disease. Therefore, membrane systems offer a broad range of applications in the field of tissue engineering.

This Special Issue aims to cover the latest developments and innovations regarding the multifunctional role of membrane systems for tissue engineering applications. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Advanced approaches in membrane synthesis and characterization;
  • Functionalization procedures of membranes;
  • Membrane bioreactors;
  • Bioartificial organs;
  • Cell–membrane interactions;
  • Bioabsorbable materials;
  • Micro/nano fabrication methods;
  • Membranes for cell/drug delivery;
  • In vitro membrane platforms for disease modeling/drug screening;
  • Biosensors;
  • Bioprinting methods;
  • Microfluidic systems.

Authors are invited to submit their latest results; both original papers and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Sabrina Morelli
Prof. Dr. Shih-Jung (Sean) Liu
Dr. Loredana De Bartolo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Instructive membranes
  • Tissue engineering
  • Membrane bioreactors
  • Bioartificial organs
  • Membrane properties
  • Mass transfer
  • Implantable membranes
  • Cell–membrane interactions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Hollow Fiber Membranes of PCL and PCL/Graphene as Scaffolds with Potential to Develop In Vitro Blood—Brain Barrier Models
Membranes 2020, 10(8), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10080161 - 22 Jul 2020
Abstract
There is a huge interest in developing novel hollow fiber (HF) membranes able to modulate neural differentiation to produce in vitro blood–brain barrier (BBB) models for biomedical and pharmaceutical research, due to the low cell-inductive properties of the polymer HFs used in current [...] Read more.
There is a huge interest in developing novel hollow fiber (HF) membranes able to modulate neural differentiation to produce in vitro blood–brain barrier (BBB) models for biomedical and pharmaceutical research, due to the low cell-inductive properties of the polymer HFs used in current BBB models. In this work, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and composite PCL/graphene (PCL/G) HF membranes were prepared by phase inversion and were characterized in terms of mechanical, electrical, morphological, chemical, and mass transport properties. The presence of graphene in PCL/G membranes enlarged the pore size and the water flux and presented significantly higher electrical conductivity than PCL HFs. A biocompatibility assay showed that PCL/G HFs significantly increased C6 cells adhesion and differentiation towards astrocytes, which may be attributed to their higher electrical conductivity in comparison to PCL HFs. On the other hand, PCL/G membranes produced a cytotoxic effect on the endothelial cell line HUVEC presumably related with a higher production of intracellular reactive oxygen species induced by the nanomaterial in this particular cell line. These results prove the potential of PCL HF membranes to grow endothelial cells and PCL/G HF membranes to differentiate astrocytes, the two characteristic cell types that could develop in vitro BBB models in future 3D co-culture systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Systems for Tissue Engineering 2020)
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Open AccessArticle
Microtube Array Membrane (MTAM)-Based Encapsulated Cell Therapy for Cancer Treatment
Membranes 2020, 10(5), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10050080 - 26 Apr 2020
Abstract
The treatment of cancer has evolved significantly in recent years with a strong focus on immunotherapy. Encapsulated Cell Therapy (ECT) for immunotherapy-based anti-cancer treatment is a unique niche within this landscape, where molecules such as signaling factors and antibodies produced from cells are [...] Read more.
The treatment of cancer has evolved significantly in recent years with a strong focus on immunotherapy. Encapsulated Cell Therapy (ECT) for immunotherapy-based anti-cancer treatment is a unique niche within this landscape, where molecules such as signaling factors and antibodies produced from cells are encapsulated within a vehicle, with a host amount of benefits in terms of treatment efficacy and reduced side effects. However, traditional ECTs generally lie in two extremes; either a macro scale vehicle is utilized, resulting in a retrievable system but with limited diffusion and surface area, or a micro scale vehicle is utilized, resulting in a system that has excellent diffusion and surface area but is unretrievable in the event of side effects occurring, which greatly compromises the biosafety of patients. In this study we adapted our patented and novel electrospun Polysulfone (PSF) Microtube Array Membranes (MTAMs) as a ‘middle’ approach to the above dilemma, which possess excellent diffusion and surface area while being retrievable. Hybridoma cells were encapsulated within the PSF MTAMs, where they produced CEACAM6 antibodies to be used in the suppression of cancer cell line A549, MDA-MB-468 and PC 3 (control). In vitro and in vivo studies revealed excellent cell viability of hybridoma cells with continuous secretion of CEACAM6 antibodies which suppressed the MDA-MB-468 throughout the entire 21 days of experiment. Such outcome suggested that the PSF MTAMs were not only an excellent three-dimensional (3D) cell culture substrate but potentially also an excellent vehicle for the application in ECT systems. Future research needs to include a long term in vivo >6 months study before it can be used in clinical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Systems for Tissue Engineering 2020)
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