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Special Issue "Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Alessandro Picelli

Neuromotor and Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Center, Department of Neuroscience, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, P.le L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: rehabilitation medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current best practice in stroke management aims to reduce the initial impact of brain damage, take precautions to avoid the further burden of complications, and maximize functional recovery through extensive rehabilitation treatment. Considering stroke as a multidimensional condition depending on the part of the body or type of ability affected, a multidisciplinary management is required.

As for stroke rehabilitation, there are many approaches including medications for the management of several post-stroke conditions (e.g. spasticity, pain, depression), physical therapy (e.g. range-of-motion therapy, motor-skill exercises, mobility training, constraint-induced movement therapy), technology-assisted training (e.g. electromechanical or robotic technology, virtual reality, telerehabilitation technology, wireless technology), cognitive or emotional treatment (e.g. therapy for cognitive and communication disorders, psychological management), and others (e.g. noninvasive brain stimulation, functional electrical stimulation, alternative medicine).

I invite you to submit original research articles and reviews that will contribute to the field of stroke rehabilitation according to the issues described above. There is a particular interest in articles proposing evidence of innovative approaches as well as in those aimed at comparing the effects of different treatment protocols therapies, including cost-effectiveness analyses.

Dr. Alessandro Picelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • medications in stroke rehabilitation
  • physical therapy interventions in stroke rehabilitation
  • technology-assisted approaches in stroke rehabilitation
  • cognitive or emotional treatment in stroke rehabilitation
  • noninvasive brain stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Prediction of the Lethal Outcome of Acute Recurrent Cerebral Ischemic Hemispheric Stroke
Medicina 2019, 55(6), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55060311
Received: 26 April 2019 / Revised: 17 June 2019 / Accepted: 20 June 2019 / Published: 25 June 2019
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Abstract
Background and objectives. Stroke-induced mortality is the third most common cause of death in developed countries. Intense interest has focused on the recurrent ischemic stroke, which rate makes up 30% during first 5 years after first-ever stroke. This work aims to develop criteria [...] Read more.
Background and objectives. Stroke-induced mortality is the third most common cause of death in developed countries. Intense interest has focused on the recurrent ischemic stroke, which rate makes up 30% during first 5 years after first-ever stroke. This work aims to develop criteria for the prediction of acute recurrent cerebral ischemic hemispheric stroke (RCIHS) outcome on the basis of comprehensive baseline clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging examinations. Materials and Methods. One hundred thirty-six patients (71 males and 65 females, median age 74 (65; 78)) with acute RCIHS were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent a detailed clinical and neurological examination using National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), computed tomography of the brain, hematological, and biochemical investigations. In order to detect the dependent and independent risk factors of the lethal outcome of the acute period of RCIHS, univariable and multivariable regression analysis were conducted. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with the calculation of sensitivity and specificity was performed to determine the prediction variables. Results. Twenty-five patients died. The independent predictors of the lethal outcome of acute RCIHS were: Baseline NIHSS score (OR 95% CІ 1.33 (1.08–1.64), p = 0.0003), septum pellucidum displacement (OR 95% CI 1.53 (1.17–2.00), p = 0.0021), glucose serum level (OR 95% CI 1.28 (1.09–1.50), p = 0.0022), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (OR 95% CI 1.11 (1.00–1.21), p = 0.0303). The mathematical model, which included these variables was developed and it could determine the prognosis of lethal outcome of the acute RCIHS with an accuracy of 86.8% (AUC = 0.88 ± 0.04 (0.88–0.93), p < 0.0001). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Neck Taping in the Treatment of Hemispatial Neglect in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot, Single Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial
Medicina 2019, 55(4), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55040108
Received: 27 December 2018 / Revised: 4 March 2019 / Accepted: 12 April 2019 / Published: 17 April 2019
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Abstract
Background and objectives: Hemispatial neglect is a common consequence of stroke, with an estimated incidence of 23%. Interventions for treating hemispatial neglect may be categorized as either top-down or bottom-up processing. The aim of top-down approaches is to train the person to voluntarily [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Hemispatial neglect is a common consequence of stroke, with an estimated incidence of 23%. Interventions for treating hemispatial neglect may be categorized as either top-down or bottom-up processing. The aim of top-down approaches is to train the person to voluntarily compensate for their neglect. Such approaches require awareness of the disorder and a high level of active participation by the patient. Differently, bottom-up approaches are based on manipulation of a patient’s sensory environment and so require less awareness of behavioral bias. In line with the latter, it is conceivable that elastic therapeutic taping applied to the left neck surface may provide bottom-up inputs that reduce hemispatial neglect symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of therapeutic neck taping on visuo-spatial abilities, neck motion, and kinesthetic sensibility in chronic stroke patients with hemispatial neglect. Materials and Methods: After randomization, 12 chronic stroke patients with hemispatial neglect received 30 consecutive days of real (treatment group) or sham (control group) neck taping. The outcomes were as follows: Stars Cancellation Test; neck active range of motion; Letter Cancellation Test; Comb and Razor Test; Cervical Joint Position Error Test evaluated before and after one month of taping. Results: Between-group comparison showed significant differences only for the Cervical Joint Position Error Test after treatment (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Our preliminary findings support the hypothesis that neck taping might improve cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility in chronic stroke patients with hemispatial neglect. Further studies are needed to strengthen our results and better investigate the effects of elastic therapeutic taping on visuo-spatial abilities in stroke patients with hemispatial neglect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery)
Figures

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