Special Issue "Impact of Multi-Morbidity and Polypharmacy on Health Outcomes in Older Age"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Phyo Myint Website E-Mail
School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK
Phone: +44 (0) 1224 437841
Interests: health services research; dementia; cardiovascular diseases; healthy ageing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aging is associated with the accumulation of multiple chronic diseases and increased risk of varying degrees of physical, cognitive, and emotional impairment. Consequently, this multi-morbidity has led to polypharmacy, which is usually defined as taking five or more medications. Polypharmacy is associated with increased risk of drug interactions, adverse effects, and other side effects, such as falls in older people. Polypharmacy may also increase the risk of cognitive and physical impairment and frailty in elderly people, independent of other risk factors. Decline in cognitive, social, and emotional function frequently coexists with physical dysfunction in late life, and there may be common pathological pathways.

In this Special Issue, we are interested in receiving articles that will help us to better understand the impact of multi-morbidity and polypharmacy on physical, mental, and social outcomes, which are related to health and social care in older age. We welcome a wide range of research papers that provide epidemiological observations, trial evidence, and mechanistic links.

Prof. Dr. Phyo Myint
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Multi-Morbidity
  • Polypharmacy
  • Older Age

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) 157: Guidelines on Risk Reduction and Management of Delirium
Medicina 2019, 55(8), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55080491 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) guideline on delirium is a major advance on existing guidelines on this condition. This is particularly important given the evidence it is frequently under-diagnosed and inadequately managed despite being common and frequently associated with significant patient and [...] Read more.
The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) guideline on delirium is a major advance on existing guidelines on this condition. This is particularly important given the evidence it is frequently under-diagnosed and inadequately managed despite being common and frequently associated with significant patient and carer distress and poor outcomes. The guidelines recommend using the 4A’s test to help detect delirium. A bundle of mostly non-pharmacological therapies minimise the risk of developing delirium and can help those who develop the condition. The importance of medical optimisation by an experienced professional in those at risk of delirium is highlighted with new recommendations for people in intensive care and surgical settings. There is guidance on follow-up of people with delirium, which should become routine. This commentary piece focusses on areas with the greatest potential to improve the experience and outcomes of those with delirium, and briefly discusses areas of ongoing uncertainty. Full article
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