Cancer Pain and Pain Medicine: Caracteristics, Management and Impact on Patients

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Intensive Care/ Anesthesiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2023) | Viewed by 5877

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Special Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, Outpatient Pain Center, Vienna General Hospital (AKH), Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: pain; invasive pain therapy; anaesthetics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The management of any kind of pain, especially neuropathic pain, is a challenge. One of the most common symptoms in cancer patients is pain. Pain can develop from cancer, cancer treatment, or the combination of both factors. Common reasons for pain include tumors, surgery, intravenous chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, supportive care therapies such as bisphosphonates, and diagnostic procedures. Younger patients are more likely to have cancer pain and pain flares than older patients. Patients with advanced cancer have more severe pain, and many cancer survivors have pain that continues after cancer treatment ends.

The currently available drugs usually do not target the multiple underlying mechanisms. Cancer pain creates significant difficulties for many patients, and can reduce quality of life.

Cancer pain typically persists past normal healing times and can have many sources, typically within the musculoskeletal system, nerve tissues, or viscera. In these situations, the pain patient is often not merely a passive victim but an active participant. They play their part by looking for solutions, through attempts to suppress or ease the experience, and sometimes literally and figuratively fighting for control. They may look for information from physicians or the Internet, trying to understand why they have pain. They may see many professionals and try many different medical treatments. They may adopt patterns of checking their body for signs of a change, or of worsening pain, and ruminate about their health problems. They may dwell on the past and imagine possible consequences of pain in the future. Today, multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary treatments are the best approaches for chronic and cancer pain. These treatments can include medications, interventional procedures, and physiotherapy paired with a psychological coping treatment.

Particularly when these treatments are unified by a model that focuses on improving functioning, they are known to be both clinically effective and cost effective. In this context, psychological research and treatment developments have contributed significantly to addressing the problems of chronic pain, and appear likely to continue to do so.

Future prospects of finding suitable drugs for pain depend on an improved understanding of pain mechanisms.  

Prof. Dr. Sabine Sator
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pain
  • cancer pain
  • nociceptive pain
  • visceral pain
  • neuropathic pain
  • acute pain
  • chronic pain
  • diabetic neuropathy
  • postherpetic neuralgia
  • failed back surgery syndrome
  • chronic pelvic pain
  • drug therapy
  • patch therapy—capsaicin
  • invasive pain therapy
  • spinal cord stimulation
  • ultrasound guided nerve blocks
  • psychological treatments
  • pain coping groups

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

13 pages, 1022 KiB  
Article
Effect of Regular Electrotherapy on Spinal Flexibility and Pain Sensitivity in Patients with Chronic Non-Specific Neck Pain and Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Double-Blinded Pilot Trial
by Asami Naka, Clea Kotz, Edith Gutmann, Sibylle Pramhas, Regina Patricia Juliane Schukro, Robin Ristl, Othmar Schuhfried, Richard Crevenna and Sabine Sator
Medicina 2023, 59(5), 823; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina59050823 - 23 Apr 2023
Viewed by 3777
Abstract
Background and Objectives: Chronic neck pain and low back pain are common conditions in high-income countries leading to social and medical problems such as invalidity and decreased quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of supra-threshold [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Chronic neck pain and low back pain are common conditions in high-income countries leading to social and medical problems such as invalidity and decreased quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of supra-threshold electrotherapy on pain level, subjective feeling of disability, and spinal mobility in patients with chronic pain in the spinal cord. Materials and Methods: 11 men and 24 women with a mean age of 49 years were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, “therapy”: supra-threshold electrotherapy was applied on the whole back after electrical calibration; group 2, “control”: electrical calibration without successive electrotherapy; group 3, “control of control”: no stimulation. Sessions were performed once a week and six times in total, each lasting 30 min. The numeric pain rating scale (NRS), cervical and lumbar range of motion (ROM), as well as disability in daily live were investigated before and after the sessions using questionnaires (Neck Disability Index, Roland Morris Questionnaire, Short-form Mc Gill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ)). Results: Spinal mobility improved significantly in the lumbar anteflexion (baseline mean, 20.34 ± SD 1.46; post session mean, 21.43 ± SD 1.95; p = 0.003) and retroflexion (baseline mean, 13.68 ± SD 1.46; post session mean, 12.05 ± SD 1.37; p = 0.006) in the group receiving electrotherapy. Pain levels measured by the NRS and disability-questionnaire scores did not differ significantly before and after treatment in any of the groups. Conclusions: Our data indicate that regular supra-threshold electrotherapy for six times has a positive effect on lumbar flexibility in chronic neck pain and low back pain patients, whereas pain sensation or subjective feeling of disability remained unchanged. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

7 pages, 908 KiB  
Review
Investigating the Influence of Anaesthesiology for Cancer Resection Surgery on Oncologic Outcomes: The Role of Experimental In Vivo Models
by Ryan Howle, Aneurin Moorthy and Donal J. Buggy
Medicina 2022, 58(10), 1380; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina58101380 - 1 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1734
Abstract
The incidence and societal burden of cancer is increasing globally. Surgery is indicated in the majority of solid tumours, and recent research in the emerging field of onco-anaesthesiology suggests that anaesthetic-analgesic interventions in the perioperative period could potentially influence long-term oncologic outcomes. While [...] Read more.
The incidence and societal burden of cancer is increasing globally. Surgery is indicated in the majority of solid tumours, and recent research in the emerging field of onco-anaesthesiology suggests that anaesthetic-analgesic interventions in the perioperative period could potentially influence long-term oncologic outcomes. While prospective, randomised controlled clinical trials are the only research method that can conclusively prove a causal relationship between anaesthetic technique and cancer recurrence, live animal (in vivo) experimental models may more realistically test the biological plausibility of these hypotheses and the mechanisms underpinning them, than limited in vitro modelling. This review outlines the advantages and limitations of available animal models of cancer and how they might be used in perioperative cancer metastasis modelling, including spontaneous or induced tumours, allograft, xenograft, and transgenic tumour models. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop