Special Issue "Advanced/Alternative Transparent Conducting Oxides"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Junyeob Yeo Website E-Mail
Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehak-ro, Bukgu, Daegu 41566, Korea
Interests: nano optics; laser-processing, nanomaterials; wearable electronics; energy devices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Transparent conducting oxides (TCO) are indispensable materials for opto-electronics, and high tranparency together with high electrical conductivity are the key parameters for transparent conductors. Since TCO materials are usually deposited on the glass substrate as a conductive thin film through a CVD or evaporator process, transparent conductive glass is the usual form for transparent conductors in conventional opto-eletronics. Among the various TCO materials, induim-doped tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) are the most widely used material in both industry and research. These materials have been successfully applied to various large-area opto-electronics such as touch screen panels, LCD/OLED displays, smart windows, and solar cells to date.

Nowadays, TCO materials are more important for industry due to the increasing demands of flexible and wearable electronics. However, ITO and FTO are not suitable for flexible and wearable eletronics due to the several intrinsic drawbacks, such as its brittleness, which causes cracks upon bending. In addition, indium is a rare earth material, resulting in a relatively high material cost for ITO production. Therefore, advanced or alternative materials (eg. metal nanowire or CNT) for TCO are required to develop and investigate next generation smart electronics such as flexible and wearable electronics.

This Special Issue is mainly focused on alternative or advanced transparent conducting oxides, as well as materials synthesis, the fabrication process, and applications of TCO. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Searching and investigating various types of advanced/alternative transparent conducting oxides:

    - Doped oxide (indium, fluorine, zinc, etc.)-based transparent conductive oxides;

    - Advanced TCO of 1D materials: Carbon nanotubes (CNT), metal (Au, Ag, Cu, Ni) nanowire, other 1D materials;

    - Advanced TCO of 2D materials: graphene, graphene/metal nanowire hybrids, other 2D materials;

  • Research into the synthesis, process, and applications of advanced/alternative transparent conducting oxides;
  • New synthesis methods for advanced/alternative transparent conducting oxides;
  • New process and fabrication methods for advanced/alternative transparent conducting oxides;
  • New applications using advanced/alternative transparent conducting oxides.

Prof. Dr. Junyeob Yeo 
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • transparent conducting oxides
  • ITO
  • FTO
  • metal nanowire
  • CNT
  • graphene
  • flexible electronics
  • wearable electronics

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of Soft Sensor Using Laser Processing Techniques: For the Alternative 3D Printing Process
Materials 2019, 12(18), 2955; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12182955 - 12 Sep 2019
Abstract
Recently, the rapid prototyping process was actively studied in industry and academia. The rapid prototyping process has various advantages such as a rapid processing speed, high processing freedom, high efficiency, and eco-friendly process compared to the conventional etching process. However, in general, it [...] Read more.
Recently, the rapid prototyping process was actively studied in industry and academia. The rapid prototyping process has various advantages such as a rapid processing speed, high processing freedom, high efficiency, and eco-friendly process compared to the conventional etching process. However, in general, it is difficult to directly apply to the fabrication of electric devices, as the molding made by the rapid prototyping process is usually a nonconductive polymer. Even when a conductive material is used for the rapid prototyping process, the molding is made by a single material; thus, its application is limited. In this study, we introduce a simple alternative process for the fabrication of a soft sensor using laser processing techniques. The UV laser curing of polymer resin and laser welding of nanowires are conducted and analyzed. Through the laser processing techniques, we can easily fabricate soft sensors, which is considered an alternative 3D printing process for the fabrication of soft sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced/Alternative Transparent Conducting Oxides)
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Open AccessArticle
FEP Encapsulated Crack-Based Sensor for Measurement in Moisture-Laden Environment
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1516; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091516 - 09 May 2019
Abstract
Among many flexible mechanosensors, a crack-based sensor inspired by a spider’s slit organ has received considerable attention due to its great sensitivity compared to previous strain sensors. The sensor’s limitation, however, lies on its vulnerability to stress concentration and the metal layers’ delamination. [...] Read more.
Among many flexible mechanosensors, a crack-based sensor inspired by a spider’s slit organ has received considerable attention due to its great sensitivity compared to previous strain sensors. The sensor’s limitation, however, lies on its vulnerability to stress concentration and the metal layers’ delamination. To address this issue of vulnerability, we used fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) as an encapsulation layer on both sides of the sensor. The excellent waterproof and chemical resistance capability of FEP may effectively protect the sensor from damage in water and chemicals while improving the durability against friction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced/Alternative Transparent Conducting Oxides)
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Open AccessArticle
Design of Polarization-Independent and Wide-Angle Broadband Absorbers for Highly Efficient Reflective Structural Color Filters
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1050; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071050 - 30 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
We propose a design of angle-insensitive and polarization-independent reflective color filters with high efficiency (>80%) based on broad resonance in a Fabry–Pérot cavity where asymmetric metal-dielectric-metal planar structures are employed. Broadband absorption properties allow the resonance in the visible range to remain nearly [...] Read more.
We propose a design of angle-insensitive and polarization-independent reflective color filters with high efficiency (>80%) based on broad resonance in a Fabry–Pérot cavity where asymmetric metal-dielectric-metal planar structures are employed. Broadband absorption properties allow the resonance in the visible range to remain nearly constant over a broad range of incident angles of up to 40° for both s- and p-polarizations. Effects of the angles of incidence and polarization state of incident light on the purity of the resulting colors are examined on the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram. In addition, higher-order resonances of the proposed color filters and their electric field distributions are investigated for improved color purity. Lastly, the spectral properties of the proposed structures with different metallic layers are studied. The simple strategy described in this work could be adopted in a variety of research areas, such as color decoration devices, microscopy, and colorimetric sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced/Alternative Transparent Conducting Oxides)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Shear-Assisted Laser Transfer of Metal Nanoparticle Ink to an Elastomer Substrate
Materials 2018, 11(12), 2511; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11122511 - 11 Dec 2018
Abstract
Selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle ink is an attractive technology for the creation of metal layers at the microscale without any vacuum deposition process, yet its application to elastomer substrates has remained a highly challenging task. To address this issue, we introduced [...] Read more.
Selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle ink is an attractive technology for the creation of metal layers at the microscale without any vacuum deposition process, yet its application to elastomer substrates has remained a highly challenging task. To address this issue, we introduced the shear-assisted laser transfer of metal nanoparticle ink by utilizing the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the elastomer and the target metal electrode. The laser was focused and scanned across the absorbing metal nanoparticle ink layer that was in conformal contact with the elastomer with a high thermal expansion coefficient. The resultant shear stress at the interface assists the selective transfer of the sintered metal nanoparticle layer. We expect that the proposed method can be a competent fabrication route for a transparent conductor on elastomer substrates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced/Alternative Transparent Conducting Oxides)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Design of Shape Memory Alloy Coil Spring Actuator for Improving Performance in Cyclic Actuation
Materials 2018, 11(11), 2324; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11112324 - 19 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Performance of the shape memory alloy (SMA) coil spring actuator in cyclic actuation as an artificial muscle is strongly related to the mechanical design of the coil geometry. This paper proposes a practical design method for improving the frequency and efficiency of the [...] Read more.
Performance of the shape memory alloy (SMA) coil spring actuator in cyclic actuation as an artificial muscle is strongly related to the mechanical design of the coil geometry. This paper proposes a practical design method for improving the frequency and efficiency of the SMA coil spring actuator; by designing the SMA coil spring to have large index (coil diameter/wire diameter) and pitch angle (LIP), cooling characteristics can be improved (increasing the actuation frequency) and large deformation can be obtained. The LIP design process is based on the two-state static model that describes the displacement-force relationship of the SMA coil spring in two states—a fully austenite phase and a fully martensite phase. The design process gives accurate design parameters of the SMA coil spring actuator that satisfy the required stroke and force. The model of the fully martensite phase of the SMA coil that includes the stress-induced detwinning enables the use of maximum shear strain of the SMA. The design method reduces the mass of an SMA without changing the stroke and increase the power density and efficiency. The cyclic actuation experiments demonstrate that the LIP design doubles the maximum frequency of SMA coil actuator with one-sixth the mass of the non-LIP design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced/Alternative Transparent Conducting Oxides)
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