Special Issue "The Synthesis, Structure and Properties of Novel Carbon Based Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Alexander Okotrub
Website
Guest Editor
Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia
Interests: material characterization; nanomaterials; thin films and nanotechnology; nanomaterials synthesis; nanostructured materials; nanoparticle synthesis; nanoparticles; composites; materials chemistry; electronic structure; condensed matter physics; solid state physics; physical chemistry; carbon nanotubes; carbon nanomaterials; graphene; hydrogen production; solid-state chemistry
Dr. Olga Sedelnikova
Website
Guest Editor
Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia
Interests: material characterization; electronic structure; condensed matter physics; solid state physics; physical chemistry; carbon nanotubes; carbon nanomaterials; graphene; hydrogen production; solid-state chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the discovery of fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, many novel carbon allotropes have been developed. Extreme synthesis conditions, such as high temperature, pressure, electron and ion irradiation, enable the formation of one-, two-, and three-dimension metastable carbon structures, which are not otherwise accessible. The brief list of carbon-based materials includes carbon onions, carbon nanotubes, perforated graphite, mesoporous carbon, nanodiamonds, and their hybrids and derivatives. These have received great attention in the scientific community due to their advanced functional properties.

The main aim of this Special Issue of Materials is to publish original research and review articles that address the synthesis, structure, applications, and challenges of novel carbon-based materials.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Novel synthesis methods, including high-energy electron and ion irradiation;
  • Arc-discharge, plasma, and CVD synthesis of carbon-based materials;
  • Laser ablation synthesis of carbon-based materials;
  • Fabrication of hybrids and nanocomposites;
  • Study of morphology and properties of carbon-based materials synthesized under extreme conditions;
  • Application of carbon material in electronics, sensing, catalysis, energy storage applications, electromagnetic shielding, etc.

We look forward to your submission.

Prof. Alexander Okotrub
Dr. Olga Sedelnikova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Carbon-based materials
  • CVD
  • Electronics
  • Sensing
  • Catalysis
  • Energy storage applications
  • Electromagnetic shielding

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Structure of Diamond Films Grown Using High-Speed Flow of a Thermally Activated CH4-H2 Gas Mixture
Materials 2020, 13(1), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13010219 - 04 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Diamond films are advanced engineering materials for various industrial applications requiring a coating material with extremely high thermal conductivity and low electrical conductivity. An approach for the synthesis of diamond films via high-speed jet deposition of thermally activated gas has been applied. In [...] Read more.
Diamond films are advanced engineering materials for various industrial applications requiring a coating material with extremely high thermal conductivity and low electrical conductivity. An approach for the synthesis of diamond films via high-speed jet deposition of thermally activated gas has been applied. In this method, spatially separated high-speed flows of methane and hydrogen were thermally activated, and methyl and hydrogen radicals were deposited on heated molybdenum substrates. The morphology and structure of three diamond films were studied, which were synthesized at a heating power of 900, 1700, or 1800 W, methane flow rate of 10 or 30 sccm, hydrogen flow rate of 1500 or 3500 sccm, and duration of the synthesis from 1.5 to 3 h.The morphology and electronic state of the carbon on the surface and in the bulk of the obtained films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman scattering, X-ray photoelectron, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. The diamond micro-crystals with a thick oxidized amorphous sp2-carbon coating were grown at a heating power of 900 W and a hydrogen flow rate of 1500 sccm. The quality of the crystals was improved, and the growth rate of the diamond film was increased seven times when the heating power was 1700–1800 W and the methane and hydrogen flow rates were 30 and 3500 sccm, respectively. Defective octahedral diamond crystals of 30 μm in size with a thin sp2-carbon surface layer were synthesized on a Mo substrate heated at 1273 K for 1.5 h. When the synthesis duration was doubled, and the substrate temperature was decreased to 1073 K, the denser film with rhombic-dodecahedron diamond crystals was grown. In this case, the thinnest hydrogenated sp2-carbon coating was detected on the surface of the diamond crystals. Full article
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