Special Issue "Materials by Non-traditional Methods of Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD)"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alexander Zhilyaev
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Guest Editor
Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ufa, Russia; Magnitogorsk State Technical University, 455000 Magnitogorsk Russia
Interests: Gradient, Bimodal and Heterogeneous Metallic Nanomaterials of Enhanced Strength and Ductility for Advanced Structural Applications Processed by Asymmetric (Cryo-) Rolling; Advanced Manufacturing including Metallic 3D Printing; Microstructure and properties gradient nanomaterials processed by high pressure torsion (HPT) including diffusion bonding of different metals and alloys; Microstructure and mechanical properties in bulk nanomaterials processed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP), high pressure torsion, asymmetric rolling, electrodeposition, ball milling (BM) and friction stir processing (FSP); Application of ECAP and HPT for cold compaction of BM powders and rapidly quenched amorphous ribbons for magnetic applications and hydrogen storage; Novel approach to metals microstructure modification by means of asymmetric rolling and friction stir processing: assessment and optimization; ng of severe plastic deformation (SPD) for developing novel materials for biomedical application (improved mechanical properties and enhanced biocompability)
Prof. Jose Maria Cabrera
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Guest Editor
Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), EEBE, 16, Av. Eduard Maristany, 08019 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: plastic deformation behavior of metals, mainly at high temperature, ultrafine structures and nano-grained metallic materials, severe plastic deformation processes, equal-channel angular pressing and mechanical alloying

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last 2–3 decades were the period of creation of ultrafine-grained (UFG) or even nanostructured metals and alloys by methods of severe plastic deformation (SPD). On this path, researchers have achieved a tremendous success: new materials with ultrafine-grained and nano structure have shown not only improved mechanical properties due to their fine grain structure, but also improved functional properties. The greatest successes were achieved for metals and alloys using classical or traditional SPD methods: equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT). Approximately 15 years ago, the mission was to industrialize these methods to obtain bulk nanostructured materials. This turned out to be not an easy task and could not be completed. In parallel, the researchers tried to develop other (alternative) methods of severe plastic deformation, different from the traditional SPD methods, to obtain bulk materials with UFG or nano structure. More than two dozen of such methods are available today and allow to obtain structure and properties of metals and alloys, which are close to those achieved by ECAP or HPT. The advantage of new methods is that they can be easily implemented at the industrial level. In contrast to ECAP or HPT materials, the data on the microstructure and properties of metals and alloys obtained by non-conventional SPD methods are poorly systematized. This Special Issue proposes to correct this deficiency and will consist of reports on the microstructure and properties (mechanical and functional) of metallic materials obtained by non-traditional methods of SPD. Special attention will be paid to asymmetric rolling methods and continuous close-die forging. These two methods have been developed in a way that can be easily scaled up to an industrial level.

The Guest Editors invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Alexander Zhilyaev
Prof. Jose Maria Cabrera
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Severe plastic deformation
  • continuous close-die forging
  • asymmetric rolling
  • gradient nanostructure
  • mechanical and functional properties

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Formability of the 5754-Aluminum Alloy Deformed by a Modified Repetitive Corrugation and Straightening Process
Materials 2020, 13(3), 633; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030633 - 31 Jan 2020
Abstract
Sheets of 5754-aluminum alloy processed by a modified repetitive corrugation and straightening (RCS) process were tested in order to measure their formability. For this purpose, forming limit curves were derived. They showed that the material forming capacity decreased after being processed by RCS. [...] Read more.
Sheets of 5754-aluminum alloy processed by a modified repetitive corrugation and straightening (RCS) process were tested in order to measure their formability. For this purpose, forming limit curves were derived. They showed that the material forming capacity decreased after being processed by RCS. However, they kept good formability in the initial stages of the RCS process. The formability study was complemented with microstructural analysis (derivation of texture) and mechanical tests to obtain the strain-rate sensitivity. The texture analysis was done by employing X-ray diffraction, obtaining pole figures, and the orientation distribution function. It was noticed that the initial texture was conserved after successive RCS passes, but the intensity dropped. RCS process did not induce β-fiber, contrary to common deformation process. The strain-rate sensitivity coefficient was measured through tensile tests at different temperatures and strain rates; the coefficient of the samples processed after one and two passes were still relatively high, indicating the capacity to delay necking, in agreement with the good formability observed in the initial passes of the RCS process. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Machining Velocity on Ultra-Fine Grained Al 7075 Alloy Produced by Cryogenic Temperature Large Strain Extrusion Machining
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1656; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101656 - 21 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this study, cryogenic temperature large strain extrusion machining (CT-LSEM) as a novel severe plastic deformation (SPD) method for producing ultra-fine grained (UFG) microstructure is investigated. Solution treated Al 7075 alloy was subjected to CT-LSEM, room temperature (RT) LSEM, as well as CT [...] Read more.
In this study, cryogenic temperature large strain extrusion machining (CT-LSEM) as a novel severe plastic deformation (SPD) method for producing ultra-fine grained (UFG) microstructure is investigated. Solution treated Al 7075 alloy was subjected to CT-LSEM, room temperature (RT) LSEM, as well as CT free machining (CT-FM) with different machining velocities to study their comparative effects. The microstructure evolution and mechanical properties were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Vickers hardness measurements. It is observed that the hardness of the sample has increased from 105 HV to 169 HV and the chip can be fully extruded under CT-LSEM at the velocity of 5.4 m/min. The chip thickness and hardness decrease with velocity except for RT-LSEM at the machining velocity of 21.6 m/min, under which the precipitation hardening exceeds the softening effect. The constraining tool and processing temperature play a significant role in chip morphology. DSC analysis suggests that the LSEM process can accelerate the aging kinetics of the alloy. A higher dislocation density, which is due to the suppression of dynamic recovery, contributes to the CT-LSEM samples, resulting in greater hardness than the RT-LSEM samples. Full article
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