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Special Issue "Nano-based Catalysts for Renewable Energy"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Michal Bajdich

SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: computational heterogeneous catalysis; water splitting; CO2RR; transition-metal oxides; nanostructures; electronic structure theory; computational database and machine learning
Guest Editor
Dr. Max Garcia-Melchor

School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reactions with energy-related applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meeting the global energy demand in a clean, reliable and economically affordable way is one of biggest challenges of this century. Particularly challenging is to find sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels by utilizing solar energy, water and CO2, where active, selective, stable and yet economic catalysts are needed. Although significant advances have been made in this field, there is still room for improvement by engineering nanomaterials with enhanced catalytic performance.

This Special Issue on “Nano-Based Catalysts for Renewable Energy” aims at covering research on promising nano-based catalysts with potential applications to renewable energy and the fundamental understanding of chemical processes related to renewable energy. This includes (but is not limited to) the most interesting aspects of nanostructuring of catalysts such as reaction confinement, creation of uncoordinated edge sites in nano-objects, and single site catalysts. We are especially interested in original research that shows: i) the electro-catalytic performance of nano-based catalysts, ii) the availability of active sites with potential to break existing scaling relations, or iii) examples where the structure and activity have been well resolved.

Dr. Michal Bajdich
Prof. Dr. Max Garcia-Melchor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Heterogeneous catalysis
  • Electrocatalysis
  • Renewable energy
  • Nanomaterials
  • Electrolysers
  • Fuel cells
  • Batteries

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Efficient Photocatalytic Degradation of Malachite Green in Seawater by the Hybrid of Zinc-Oxide Nanorods Grown on Three-Dimensional (3D) Reduced Graphene Oxide(RGO)/Ni Foam
Materials 2018, 11(6), 1004; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11061004
Received: 9 May 2018 / Revised: 1 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1567 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A hybrid of ZnO nanorods grown onto three-dimensional (3D) reduced graphene oxide (RGO)@Ni foam (ZnO/[email protected]) is synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The as-prepared hybrid material is physically characterized by SEM, XRD, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When the as-prepared 3D hybrid [...] Read more.
A hybrid of ZnO nanorods grown onto three-dimensional (3D) reduced graphene oxide (RGO)@Ni foam (ZnO/[email protected]) is synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The as-prepared hybrid material is physically characterized by SEM, XRD, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When the as-prepared 3D hybrid is investigated as a photocatalyst, it demonstrates significant high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue (MB), rhodamine (RhB), and mixed MB/RhB as organic dye pollutants. In addition, the practical application and the durability of the as-prepared catalyst to degradation of malachite green (MG) in seawater are firstly assessed in a continuous flow system. The catalyst shows a high degradation efficiency and stable photocatalytic activity for 5 h continuous operation, which should be a promising catalyst for the degradation of organic dyes in seawater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-based Catalysts for Renewable Energy)
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Open AccessArticle Palladium, Iridium, and Rhodium Supported Catalysts: Predictive H2 Chemisorption by Statistical Cuboctahedron Clusters Model
Materials 2018, 11(5), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11050819
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 11 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
PDF Full-text (1360 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chemisorption of hydrogen on metallic particles is often used to estimate the metal dispersion (D), the metal particle size (d), and the metallic specific surface area (SM), currently assuming a stoichiometry of one hydrogen atom H [...] Read more.
Chemisorption of hydrogen on metallic particles is often used to estimate the metal dispersion (D), the metal particle size (d), and the metallic specific surface area (SM), currently assuming a stoichiometry of one hydrogen atom H adsorbed per surface metal atom M. This assumption leads to a large error when estimating D, d, and SM, and a rigorous method is needed to tackle this problem. A model describing the statistics of the metal surface atom and site distribution on perfect cuboctahedron clusters, already developed for Pt, is applied to Pd, Ir, and Rh, using the density functional theory (DFT) calculation of the literature to determine the most favorable adsorption sites for each metal. The model predicts the H/M values for each metal, in the range 0–1.08 for Pd, 0–2.77 for Ir, and 0–2.31 for Rh, depending on the particle size, clearly showing that the hypothesis of H/M = 1 is not always confirmed. A set of equations is then given for precisely calculating D, d, and SM for each metal directly from the H chemisorption results determined experimentally, without any assumption about the H/M stoichiometry. This methodology provides a powerful tool for accurate determination of metal dispersion, metal particle size, and metallic specific surface area from chemisorption experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-based Catalysts for Renewable Energy)
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