Special Issue "Novel In Situ Synthesis of Advanced Functional Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nathalie Steunou
Website
Guest Editor
Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, Versailles, France
Interests: hybrid materials; oxides; composites; metal organic frameworks; sol-gel; (bio)polymers; biomacromolecules

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A remarkable amount of functional materials has been elaborated due to the synergetic coupling of different components (molecular precursors, colloids, (bio)-organic molecules, polymers, complex fluids, templating agents, liquid crystalline phases, etc.) and the development of processing and patterning techniques (electrodeposition, chemical/physical vapor deposition, extrusion, lithography, etc.). The design of complex and multifunctional materials has led to the exploration of numerous synthetic strategies that are eventually combined with shaping techniques to control their composition (single or multicomponent phase), structure, texture and interfacial properties. A promising method for the preparation of these materials is afforded by the in-situ synthesis approach in which the synthesis and self-assembly of components take place in one-step procedure together with the shaping of materials. This strategy allows a rational design of materials with tailored architecture and microstructure while reducing the number of manufacturing steps.

This Special Issue is intended to cover novel in-situ synthesis approaches of a wide range of functional materials differing by their composition (inorganic or organic solids, hybrids, polymers, composites, etc.), texture (porous or dense) and functionality. Moreover, it is well known that the control over the physico-chemical and structural properties of inorganic and hybrid materials is generally based on the appropriate tailoring of the parameters that influence nucleation and growth. Therefore, the rational design of materials requires the understanding of their growth mechanism which can be studied by sampling and characterizing the reaction medium by in-situ or ex-situ methods at different times. This special issue may also consider the understanding of the formation mechanism of materials through the development of in-situ complementary experimental tools. 

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Nathalie Steunou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • In-situ synthesis
  • inorganic and/or organic materials
  • hybrids
  • composites
  • multifunctional materials
  • mechanism of formation
  • nucleation/growth

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
In-Situ Growth of Au on KTaO3 Sub-Micron Cubes via Wet Chemical Approach for Enhanced Photodegradation of p-Nitrophenol
Materials 2019, 12(12), 1950; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12121950 - 17 Jun 2019
Abstract
KTaO3/Au hetero-nanostructures were synthesized by in-situ reduction of HAuCl4 on the surface of hydrothermally-grown KTaO3 sub-micron cubes. The concentration of Au source was found to be a critical factor in controlling the hetero-nucleation of Au nanoparticles on the surface [...] Read more.
KTaO3/Au hetero-nanostructures were synthesized by in-situ reduction of HAuCl4 on the surface of hydrothermally-grown KTaO3 sub-micron cubes. The concentration of Au source was found to be a critical factor in controlling the hetero-nucleation of Au nanoparticles on the surface of KTaO3 sub-micron cubes. Loading of Au particles on KTaO3 nanocrystals enriched KTaO3 additional UV-vis absorption in the visible light region. Both KTaO3 and KTaO3/Au nanocrystals were shown to be active in the photo-degradation of p-nitrophenol, while the loading of Au on KTaO3 clearly improved the photo-degradation efficiency of p-nitrophenol compared to that on bare KTaO3 nanocrystals, probably due to the improved light absorption and charge separation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel In Situ Synthesis of Advanced Functional Materials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for In Situ Monitoring of Porous Materials Formation under Hydrothermal Conditions
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1416; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081416 - 12 Aug 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
The employment of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for studying crystalline porous materials formation is reviewed in the context of the development of in situ methodologies for the observation of the real synthesis medium, with the aim of unraveling the nucleation and growth [...] Read more.
The employment of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for studying crystalline porous materials formation is reviewed in the context of the development of in situ methodologies for the observation of the real synthesis medium, with the aim of unraveling the nucleation and growth processes mechanism. Both liquid and solid state NMR techniques are considered to probe the local environment at molecular level of the precursor species either soluble in the liquid phase or present in the reactive gel. Because the mass transport between the liquid and solid components of the heterogeneous system plays a key role in the synthesis course, the two methods provide unique insights and are complementary. Recent technological advances for hydrothermal conditions NMR are detailed and their applications to zeolite and related materials crystallization are illustrated. Achievements in the field are exemplified with some representative studies of relevance to zeolites, aluminophosphate zeotypes, and metal-organic frameworks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel In Situ Synthesis of Advanced Functional Materials)
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