Special Issue "Halide Perovskite Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Sylvain G. Cloutier
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering, École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada
Interests: optoelectronic nanomaterials; solution-based processing; inkjet printing; halide perovskites; hybrid architectures; smart coatings; optoelectronic devices; light-emitting diodes; photovoltaics; micro-spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As we know, there is an urgent need for better optoelectronic materials produced via low-cost solution-based processing. Currently, this research is largely motivated by the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) and by energy-oriented applications.

As we know, the Internet of Things revolution aims at enabling us to take better-informed decisions in real-time, based on more complete and readily-acquired sets of data. Either for biomedical, manufacturing, or consumer electronics, better and cheaper sensor architectures using solution-based materials and processes will obviously be essential in these profound transformations.

It is also clear that the world urgently needs more affordable, efficient, and renewable energy sources, together with a better use of our current resources. Better low-cost and solution-processed materials and devices can help significantly towards energy accessibility and sustainability.

In the last decade, organo-metal halide perovskite materials have shown great potential for low-cost, solution-based optoelectronic applications, mostly as outstanding absorbers for solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, great fundamental challenges remain regarding their long-term performance and stability.

Today, these exciting breakthroughs have generated a worldwide research effort to seek new synthesis routes, improve the stability, and understand and control the fundamental physical properties of halide perovskite materials. In turn, this research directly leads to better optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices. While the most exciting results so far have involved lead-based perovskites, there is also a growing interest for new lead-free perovskite materials.

As such, I am delighted to send you an invitation for this Special Issue on Halide Perovskite Materials to submit manuscripts describing:

  • New synthesis routes;
  • Improved stability;
  • Physical properties;
  • Device integration (excluding photovoltaics);
  • Photovoltaics;
  • Lead-free perovskites.

Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Sylvain G. Cloutier
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • New synthesis routes 
  • Improved stability 
  • Physical properties 
  • Device integration (excl. photovoltaics) 
  • Photovoltaics 
  • Lead-free perovskite materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Interfacial Traps on the Operating Temperature of Perovskite Solar Cells
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2727; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172727 - 26 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this paper, by developing a mathematical model, the temperature of PSCs under different operating conditions has been calculated. It is found that by reducing the density of tail states at the interfaces through some passivation mechanisms, the operating temperature can be decreased [...] Read more.
In this paper, by developing a mathematical model, the temperature of PSCs under different operating conditions has been calculated. It is found that by reducing the density of tail states at the interfaces through some passivation mechanisms, the operating temperature can be decreased significantly at higher applied voltages. The results show that if the density of tail states at the interfaces is reduced by three orders of magnitude through some passivation mechanisms, then the active layer may not undergo any phase change up to an ambient temperature 300 K and it may not degrade up to 320 K. The calculated heat generation at the interfaces at different applied voltages with and without passivation shows reduced heat generation after reducing the density of tail states at the interfaces. It is expected that this study provides a deeper understanding of the influence of interface passivation on the operating temperature of PSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Halide Perovskite Materials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Improvement Properties of Hybrid Halide Perovskite Thin Films Prepared by Sequential Evaporation for Planar Solar Cells
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1394; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091394 - 29 Apr 2019
Abstract
Thin films of CH3NH3PbI3 and (NH2)2CHPbI3 (from now on abbreviated as MAPI and FAPI respectively), with perovskite structure were prepared by sequential evaporation of lead iodide (PbI2) and methylammonium iodide (MAI) [...] Read more.
Thin films of CH3NH3PbI3 and (NH2)2CHPbI3 (from now on abbreviated as MAPI and FAPI respectively), with perovskite structure were prepared by sequential evaporation of lead iodide (PbI2) and methylammonium iodide (MAI) or formamidinium iodide (FAI), with special emphasis on the optimization of its optical, morphologic, and structural properties. For this, the evaporation process was automatically controlled with a system developed using virtual instrumentation (VI) that allows electronic control of both evaporation sources temperature and precursors deposition rates, using proportional integral derivative (PID) and pulse width modulation (PWM) control algorithms developed with the LabView software. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD), information was obtained regarding the phase and crystalline structure of the studied samples as well as the effect of the main deposition parameters on crystallite size and microstrain. We also studied the influence of the main deposition parameters on the optical and morphological properties through measurements of spectral transmittance and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively. It was found that the implemented method of sequential evaporation allows preparing, with a high degree of reproducibility, single phase MAPI and FAPI thin films with appropriate properties to be used as active layer in hybrid solar cells. The applicability of MAPI and FAPI thin films as active layer in photovoltaic devices has been demonstrated by using them in solar cells with structure: FTO/ZnO/MAPI(or FAPI)/P3HT/Au. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Halide Perovskite Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop