Special Issue "Materials for High Performance Electrocatalytic Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Dimitrios Tsiplakides
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: Electrochemistry; Electrocatalysis; Electrochemical kinetics and electrochemical reaction engineering; Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells; Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs); PEM and Solid Oxide Electrolysis; Li-ion batteries; Heterogeneous catalysis; Electrochemical Promotion of Catalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last few decades, worldwide energy demand has rapidly increased due to limitations of fossil fuels, while the needs for sustainable and environmentally-friendly energy production methods through renewable alternative resources have become necessary. Hydrogen has the potential to be the key in the overall approach to tackle the issues of energy supply and climate change. Hydrogen is a clean energy carrier that can be used directly as a fuel in transportation means and other applications. Hydrogen can be produced using a number of different processes, including thermochemical, electrolytic, photo(electro)chemical and biochemical processes. Hydrogen production by electrochemical and solar-driven photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting are the most promising energy vectors for large-scale storage of intermittent electricity from solar or wind energy, providing affordable clean energy with rapid response and wide operation range.

Despite the fact that electrochemical hydrogen production has more advantages compared to other technologies, high cost and scarcity of the electrocatalysts remain a significant drawback. Water splitting electrocatalysts should combine both high activity and considerable stability for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). A large amount of electrocatalyst is necessary to overcome the sluggish OER reaction kinetics, which lowers the efficiency of the electrolyzer. At high hydrogen production rates, the availability of electrocatalyst materials may become a serious issue due to the limited resources on earth.

The Special Issue, “Materials for High Performance Electrocatalytic Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution” will address recent advances in respect to the development of electrocatalysts for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting for robust operation, sufficient lifetime and competitive cost in order to allow market penetration of the technology. Articles and reviews dealing with catalyst design, synthesis and advanced characterization, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) fabrication, experimental/theoretical studies on electrochemical interfaces of water splitting, fundamental studies of hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction mechanisms, novel photoelectrochemical cell and system designs are very welcome.

Prof. Dr. Dimitrios Tsiplakides
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water Electrolysis
  • Water Splitting
  • Hydrogen
  • Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis
  • Solid Oxide Electrolysis (SOE)
  • Alkaline Electrolysis
  • Anion Exchange Membrane (AEM) Electrolysis
  • Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER)
  • Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER)
  • Photo(electro)catalysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Non-Precious Electrodes for Practical Alkaline Water Electrolysis
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1336; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081336 - 24 Apr 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
Water electrolysis is a promising approach to hydrogen production from renewable energy sources. Alkaline water electrolyzers allow using non-noble and low-cost materials. An analysis of common assumptions and experimental conditions (low concentrations, low temperature, low current densities, and short-term experiments) found in the [...] Read more.
Water electrolysis is a promising approach to hydrogen production from renewable energy sources. Alkaline water electrolyzers allow using non-noble and low-cost materials. An analysis of common assumptions and experimental conditions (low concentrations, low temperature, low current densities, and short-term experiments) found in the literature is reported. The steps to estimate the reaction overpotentials for hydrogen and oxygen reactions are reported and discussed. The results of some of the most investigated electrocatalysts, namely from the iron group elements (iron, nickel, and cobalt) and chromium are reported. Past findings and recent progress in the development of efficient anode and cathode materials appropriate for large-scale water electrolysis are presented. The experimental work is done involving the direct-current electrolysis of highly concentrated potassium hydroxide solutions at temperatures between 30 and 100 °C, which are closer to industrial applications than what is usually found in literature. Stable cell components and a good performance was achieved using Raney nickel as a cathode and stainless steel 316L as an anode by means of a monopolar cell at 75 °C, which ran for one month at 300 mA cm−2. Finally, the proposed catalysts showed a total kinetic overpotential of about 550 mV at 75 °C and 1 A cm−2. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Realistic Approach for Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production
Materials 2018, 11(8), 1269; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11081269 - 24 Jul 2018
Cited by 7
Abstract
The production of hydrogen by water splitting has been a very attractive idea for several decades. However, the energy consumption that is necessary for water oxidation is too high for practical applications. On the contrary, the oxidation of organics is a much easier [...] Read more.
The production of hydrogen by water splitting has been a very attractive idea for several decades. However, the energy consumption that is necessary for water oxidation is too high for practical applications. On the contrary, the oxidation of organics is a much easier and less energy-demanding process. In addition, it may be used to consume organic wastes with a double environmental benefit: renewable energy production with environmental remediation. The oxidation of organics in a photoelectrochemical cell, which in that case is also referenced as a photocatalytic fuel cell, has the additional advantage of providing an alternative route for solar energy conversion. With this in mind, the present work describes a realistic choice of materials for the Pt-free photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen, by employing ethanol as a model organic fuel. The photoanode was made of a combination of titania with cadmium sulfide as the photosensitizer in order to enhance visible light absorbance. The cathode electrode was a simple carbon paper. Thus, it is shown that substantial hydrogen can be produced without electrocatalysts by simply exploiting carbon electrodes. Even though an ion transfer membrane was used in order to allow for an oxygen-free cathode environment, the electrolyte was the same in both the anode and cathode compartments. An alkaline electrolyte has been used to allow high hydroxyl concentration, thus facilitating organic fuel (photocatalytic) oxidation. Hydrogen production was then obtained by water reduction at the cathode (counter) electrode. Full article
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