Special Issue "Dielectric Polymer Materials: Fabrication, Characterization and Application"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Georgios C. Psarras
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Smart Materials & Nanodielectrics Laboratory, Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
Interests: smart materials; polymer nanocomposites; polymers; nanodielectrics; dielectric behavior; conductivity; storing/retrieving energy; stimuli-responsive materials; active dielectrics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymers constitute an important class of engineering materials in everyday life and high-tech applications. The majority of polymers and polymer-based composites are classified as insulators, because they exhibit very low conductivity. Thermoplastics, thermosettings, elastomers, biopolymers, polymer blends, and their micro- and nanocomposites belong to this category. All of them are considered to be dielectric materials, and their electrical performance is related to their polarization, dielectric permittivity and loss, relaxation phenomena, interfacial effects, conductance mechanisms, and dielectric breakdown strength. The dielectric response of polymer dielectrics can be tuned by controlling the fabrication method and the ingredients.

Current and potential applications of polymer-based dielectrics include, but are not limited to, integrated capacitors, hybrid electric vehicles, cellular phones, microelectronic devices, packaging, solar cells, batteries, strain sensors, interlayer capacitors, self-current regulators, wireless personal digital assistance, electromagnetic shielding, energy storage devices, and so on.

In this Special Issue on “Dielectric Polymer Materials: Fabrication, Characterization, and Application”, we welcome original research and reviews on experimental or theoretical/computational studies of all kinds on polymer-based dielectric materials. The design and fabrication of novel polymer-based dielectric materials, polymer matrix micro- and nanocomposites and hybrids, biological systems, electrical engineering devices, insulation systems, stimuli-responsive materials, smart materials, the structure–properties relationship, and all kinds of current and forthcoming applications comprise a short—and definitely not exhaustive—list of the possible subjects for this Special Issue. 

Prof. Georgios C. Psarras
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymers
  • Polymer micro/nano-composites
  • Hybrids
  • Dielectric permittivity
  • Dielectric loss
  • Insulation
  • Relaxations
  • Molecular mobility
  • Polarization
  • Interfacial effects
  • Conductivity mechanisms
  • Glass-to-rubber transition
  • Stimuli-responsive polymers
  • Multifunctional materials
  • Nanodielectrics
  • Energy materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Flexibility of Biodegradable Polymer Stents with Different Strut Geometries
Materials 2020, 13(15), 3332; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13153332 - 27 Jul 2020
Viewed by 552
Abstract
Objective: Biodegradable stents (BDSs) represent a new technological development in the field of cardiovascular angioplasty; good flexibility helps stents pass through tortuous vessels during delivery and reduces the amount of damage caused to blood vessels. This study investigates the relationship between flexibility and [...] Read more.
Objective: Biodegradable stents (BDSs) represent a new technological development in the field of cardiovascular angioplasty; good flexibility helps stents pass through tortuous vessels during delivery and reduces the amount of damage caused to blood vessels. This study investigates the relationship between flexibility and the geometry of BDS struts. Methods: Four stent struts with different geometry (circular, triangular, hexagonal, and spline curved) and the same links were modeled to evaluate their flexibility via a three-point bending experimental method and a numerical method. Results: The bending state of the four stents was well-balanced. The bending effect of the four stents was different. Under the same conditions, the circular and spline curved stents showed the best bending effects while the hexagonal stent was the worst. However, these differences were not significant. Conclusion: The flexibility of BDSs is related to the geometry of the struts and links; however, the geometry of the struts has less effect on flexibility than the links. The greater the area enclosed by the strut centerline, the better flexibility of the stent. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Performance of Silicone Rubber Composites Filled with Aluminum Nitride and Alumina Tri-Hydrate
Materials 2020, 13(11), 2489; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112489 - 29 May 2020
Viewed by 598
Abstract
In this study, silicone rubber (SR) composites were prepared with various amounts of aluminum nitride (AlN) and alumina tri-hydrate (ATH), and vinyl tri-methoxysilane (VTMS) was also introduced to prepare SR/ATH/AlN–VTMS composites for comparison. Compared to the SR/ATH composites, the SR/ATH/AlN composites with higher [...] Read more.
In this study, silicone rubber (SR) composites were prepared with various amounts of aluminum nitride (AlN) and alumina tri-hydrate (ATH), and vinyl tri-methoxysilane (VTMS) was also introduced to prepare SR/ATH/AlN–VTMS composites for comparison. Compared to the SR/ATH composites, the SR/ATH/AlN composites with higher AlN loading exhibited higher breakdown strength and thermal conductivity, which were further improved by the addition of VTMS. Such results were related to the enhanced rubber–filler interfacial interactions from VTMS coupling, as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and the curing behaviors of the SR composites. Moreover, by replacing ATH with VTMS-coupled AlN, the SR/ATH/AlN–VTMS composites also exhibited lower dielectric loss along with an increased dielectric constant, suggesting the promising application of VTMS-coupled AlN as a filler for the preparation of the SR composites as high-voltage insulators. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Temperature Effects on the Dielectric Properties and Breakdown Performance of h-BN/Epoxy Composites
Materials 2019, 12(24), 4112; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12244112 - 09 Dec 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 793
Abstract
Epoxy–boron nitride composites are promising insulating materials, and it is highly important to understand their insulating performances at different temperatures with different nano-doping amounts. In this study, we investigated the effects of different mass fractions of epoxy–micron hexagonal boron nitride composites on their [...] Read more.
Epoxy–boron nitride composites are promising insulating materials, and it is highly important to understand their insulating performances at different temperatures with different nano-doping amounts. In this study, we investigated the effects of different mass fractions of epoxy–micron hexagonal boron nitride composites on their thermal conductivity, as well as the effects of temperature and mass fraction on their insulating performances. The results demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of epoxy–micron hexagonal boron nitride composites was superior to that of neat epoxy. The thermal conductivity of epoxy–micron hexagonal boron nitride composites increased with the mass fraction of hexagonal boron nitride, and their dielectric constant and dielectric loss increased with temperature. The dielectric constant of epoxy–micron hexagonal boron nitride composites decreased as the mass fraction of hexagonal boron nitride increased, while their dielectric losses decreased and then increased as the mass fraction of hexagonal boron nitride increased. Due to internal heat accumulation, the alternating current breakdown strength of epoxy–micron hexagonal boron nitride composites increased and then decreased as the mass fraction of hexagonal boron nitride increased. Additionally, as the temperature increased, the composites transitioned from the glassy state to the rubbery or viscous state, and the breakdown strength significantly degraded. Full article
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