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Special Issue "Nano- and Micro-Scale Surface Reactivity in Selected 2D Materials and Its Influence on Electronic Properties of Those Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2021) | Viewed by 2852

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Robert Szoszkiewicz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biological and Chemical Research Centre, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: 2D materials; nanomechanics of single proteins; atomic force microscopy; thermochemical nanolithography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This issue will report on and elucidate the mechanisms of nano-/micro-scale surface reactions in selected 2D materials. Contributions are expected to concentrate on transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), but other 2D materials can also be included. Contributions are expected to report and decipher various modes of surface reactivity, doping, etching, etc. in either atmospheric conditions, for example, in the presence of oxygen molecules and water vapors, and/or in atmospheres of other gases. All kinds of approaches are welcome, including experiments, theories, and simulations. Contributions are also welcome that address the influence of such micro/nano chemistry change on electronic properties and on the electronic structures of modified 2D materials. Papers dealing with the effects of underlying substrates are also welcome.

Prof. Robert Szoszkiewicz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Surface reactivity and doping
  • nano-/micro- scales
  • electronic properties changes due to surface reactions
  • transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs)
  • other 2D materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Surface Characterization of MoS2 Atomic Layers Mechanically Exfoliated on a Si Substrate
Materials 2020, 13(16), 3595; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13163595 - 14 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 813
Abstract
Mo disulfide overlayers with the thickness exceeding 1.77 nm were obtained on Si substrates through mechanical exfoliation. The resulting Mo disulfide flakes were then analyzed ex situ using combination of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) [...] Read more.
Mo disulfide overlayers with the thickness exceeding 1.77 nm were obtained on Si substrates through mechanical exfoliation. The resulting Mo disulfide flakes were then analyzed ex situ using combination of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to characterize their surface chemical composition, electron transport phenomena and surface morphology. Prior to EPES measurements, the Mo disulfide surface was sputter-cleaned and amorphized by 3 kV argon ions, and the resulting S/Mo atomic ratio varied in the range 1.80–1.88, as found from AES measurements. The SEM images revealed single crystalline small-area (up to 15 μm in lateral size) Mo disulfide flakes having polygonal or near-triangular shapes. Such irregular-edged flakes exhibited high crystal quality and thickness uniformity. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport, was evaluated from the relative EPES using Au reference material for electron energies E = 0.5–2 keV. Experimental IMFPs, λ, determined for the AES-measured surface compositions were approximated by the simple function λ = kEp, where k = 0.0289 and p = 0.946 were fitted parameters. Additionally, these IMFPs were compared with IMFPs resulting from the two methods: (i) present calculations based on the formalism of the Oswald et al. model; (ii) the predictive equation of Tanuma et al. (TPP-2M) for the measured Mo0.293S0.551C0.156 surface composition (S/Mo = 1.88), and also for stoichiometric MoS2 composition. The fitted function was found to be reasonably consistent with the measured, calculated and predicted IMFPs. We concluded that the measured IMFP value at 0.5 keV was only slightly affected by residual carbon contamination at the Mo disulfide surface. Full article
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Article
Surface-Bound and Volatile Mo Oxides Produced During Oxidation of Single MoS2 Crystals in Air and High Relative Humidity
Materials 2020, 13(14), 3067; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143067 - 09 Jul 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 921
Abstract
We report on the MoO3 oxides and their derivatives on microscopic 2H MoS2 flakes oxidized in air and high relative humidity at a moderate temperature range below 410 °C. We combine XPS and AFM measurements such as topography, friction, creation of [...] Read more.
We report on the MoO3 oxides and their derivatives on microscopic 2H MoS2 flakes oxidized in air and high relative humidity at a moderate temperature range below 410 °C. We combine XPS and AFM measurements such as topography, friction, creation of nanoscale ripples and scratches on the MoS2 flakes deposited on Si substrates. We detect MoO3 oxides mostly by measuring selected nanomechanical properties of the MoO3 layer, such as its compressive mechanical stress at the plastic yield. We discuss basal surface coverage of the single MoS2 flakes by the MoO3 oxides. We discuss conditions for appearance of all possible MoO3 oxide derivatives, such as molybdenum(VI) hydroxyoxides and MoO3 hydrates. Our findings agree with an expected mechanistic switch in thermal oxidation in water vapors vs. air. Full article
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Review

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Review
Local Interactions of Atmospheric Oxygen with MoS2 Crystals
Materials 2021, 14(20), 5979; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14205979 - 11 Oct 2021
Viewed by 737
Abstract
Thin and single MoS2 flakes are envisioned to contribute to the flexible nanoelectronics, particularly in sensing, optoelectronics and energy harvesting. Thus, it is important to study their stability and local surface reactivity. Their most straightforward surface reactions in this context pertain to [...] Read more.
Thin and single MoS2 flakes are envisioned to contribute to the flexible nanoelectronics, particularly in sensing, optoelectronics and energy harvesting. Thus, it is important to study their stability and local surface reactivity. Their most straightforward surface reactions in this context pertain to thermally induced interactions with atmospheric oxygen. This review focuses on local and thermally induced interactions of MoS2 crystals and single MoS2 flakes. First, experimentally observed data for oxygen-mediated thermally induced morphological and chemical changes of the MoS2 crystals and single MoS2 flakes are presented. Second, state-of-the-art mechanistic insight from computer simulations and arising open questions are discussed. Finally, the properties and fate of the Mo oxides arising from thermal oxidation are reviewed, and future directions into the research of the local MoS2/MoOx interface are provided. Full article
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