Special Issue "Micromechanical Characterisation and Structures of Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Structure Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alexander J G Lunt
Website
Guest Editor
Materials and Structures Centre, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, United Kingdom
Interests: micromechanics; synchrotron characterisation; electron microscopy; nanoindentation techniques

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent decades have seen significant technological advances within the fields of microscopy, piezoelectrics and X-ray focusing optics. For example, focused ion beam systems, nanoindentation, atomic force microscopy and micro/nano-focus synchrotron beamlines have made substantial progress in terms of capabilities and are becoming increasingly available to the research community. These combined capabilities have provided access to an entirely new experimental design space within the field of mechanics, such that the quantification of mechanical properties at the micro-to-nanoscale is now becoming routinely possible. The insights gained from this type of analysis have significant implications for technique optimisation and material design. In particular, they are being used to help to understand and optimise state-of-the-art material systems and production techniques to provide increased capabilities and performance.

In this Special Issue, recent developments within the field of micromechanics and structural characterisation will be highlighted and discussed. Submissions will be welcomed across a broad range of material systems, with the central theme of high-resolution characterisation particularly focusing on technique development and novel approaches.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. Full papers, communications and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Alexander J G Lunt
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microscale characterisation
  • Mechanical testing
  • Nano/microscale materials
  • Technique optimization
  • Electron microscopy
  • Focused ion beam (FIB) techniques
  • Nanoindentation
  • Atomic force microscopy (AFM)
  • Diffraction methods

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of a Taper Angle on Micro-Compression Testing of Mo-B-C Coatings
Materials 2020, 13(14), 3054; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13143054 - 08 Jul 2020
Abstract
This research was devoted to studying the influence of the taper angle on the micro-compression of micro-pillars fabricated from near-amorphous and nanocrystalline Mo-B-C coatings. A series of micro-pillars with a taper angle between 4–14° was fabricated by focused ion beam technique. The deformation [...] Read more.
This research was devoted to studying the influence of the taper angle on the micro-compression of micro-pillars fabricated from near-amorphous and nanocrystalline Mo-B-C coatings. A series of micro-pillars with a taper angle between 4–14° was fabricated by focused ion beam technique. The deformation mechanism was found to be dependent on the taper and, also, on the crystallinity of the coating. In order to obtain correct values of yield strength and Young’s modulus, three empirical models of stress correction were experimentally tested, and the results were compared with nanoindentation measurements. It was shown that the average stress correction model provided comparable results with nanoindentation for the yield strength for taper angles up to ~10°. On the other hand, the average radius or area model gave the most precise results for Young’s modulus if the taper angle was <10°. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micromechanical Characterisation and Structures of Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Structural and Micromechanical Properties of Nd:YAG Laser Marking Stainless Steel (AISI 304 and AISI 316)
Materials 2020, 13(9), 2168; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13092168 - 08 May 2020
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to examine the microstructure and micromechanical properties of pulsed-laser irradiated stainless steel. The laser marking was conducted for AISI 304 and AISI 316 stainless steel samples through a Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser. The influence of process parameters [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to examine the microstructure and micromechanical properties of pulsed-laser irradiated stainless steel. The laser marking was conducted for AISI 304 and AISI 316 stainless steel samples through a Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser. The influence of process parameters such as the pulse repetition rate and scanning speed have been considered. The microstructures of obtained samples were analyzed using confocal optical microscopy (COM). The continuous stiffness measurements (CSM) technique was applied for nanoindentional hardness and elastic modulus determination. The phase compositions of obtained specimens were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The results revealed that surface roughness is directly related to overlapping distance and the energy provided by a single pulse. The hardness of irradiated samples changes significantly with the indentation depth. The instrumental hardness HIT and elastic modulus EIT drop sharply with the rise of the indentation depth. Thus, the hardness enhancement can be observed as the indentation depth varies between 100–1000 nm for all exanimated samples. The maximum values of HIT and EIT were evaluated for the region of small depths (100–200 nm). The XRD results reveal the presence of iron and chromium oxides due to irradiation, which indicates a surface hardening effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micromechanical Characterisation and Structures of Materials)
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