Special Issue "Inorganic and Hybrid Polymers"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Ian Teasdale
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Polymer Chemistry, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Linz, Austria
Interests: polymer chemistry; biodegradable polymers; inorganic polymers; polymer therapeutics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ease of fabrication and wide range of useful and tailorable properties make synthetic polymers irreplaceable in the modern world, and with the obvious exception of polysiloxanes (silicones), the vast majority of these consist of carbon-based organic macromolecules. However, incorporating inorganic moieties, either into the polymer main-chains to give inorganic polymers, or as hybrids incorporating inorganic moieties, opens up a rich chemistry and fascinating possibilities. While even nature makes use of inorganic polymers, for example, DNA phosphorus backbone, the possibilities of inorganic polymers remain to be exploited in the world of synthetic polymers. Nevertheless, there is a blossoming research field involving inorganic and hybrid polymers, including elements from across the periodic table and with applications ranging from biomedicine to flexible electronics.

This Special Issue is dedicated to recent developments in the field of inorganic and hybrid polymers, from investigations of fundamental principles of inorganic polymers, includinging, for example, metallopolymers and heretoatom polymers containing silicon, phosphorus, boron, etc., through to the synthesis and development of multifunctional advanced materials and their applications. I cordially invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue and welcome full papers, communications, and reviews.

Prof. Ian Teasdale
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inorganic polymers
  • hybrid polymers
  • supramolecular polymers
  • metallopolymers
  • silicon
  • phosphorus
  • boron

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Magnetic and Dielectric Properties of Nano- and Micron-BiFeO3/LDPE Composites with Magnetization Treatments
Materials 2020, 13(1), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13010120 - 26 Dec 2019
Abstract
By means of magnetization treatments at ambient temperature and elevated temperatures, the nano- and micron-bismuth ferrate/low density polyethylene (BiFeO3/LDPE) dielectric composites are developed to explore the material processing method to modify the crystalline morphology, magnetic and dielectric properties. The magnetic field [...] Read more.
By means of magnetization treatments at ambient temperature and elevated temperatures, the nano- and micron-bismuth ferrate/low density polyethylene (BiFeO3/LDPE) dielectric composites are developed to explore the material processing method to modify the crystalline morphology, magnetic and dielectric properties. The magnetic field treatment can induce the dipole in the LDPE macromolecular chain which leads to preferred orientation of polyethylene crystal grains to the direction of the magnetization field. The surface morphology of the materials measured by atomic force microscope (AFM) implies that the LDPE macromolecular chains in BiFeO3/LDPE composites have been orderly arranged and form thicker lamellae accumulated with a larger spacing after high temperature magnetization, resulting in the increased dimension and orientation of spherulites. The residual magnetization intensities of BiFeO3/LDPE composites have been significantly improved by magnetization treatments at ambient temperature. After this magnetization at ambient temperature, the MR of nano- and micron-BiFeO3/LDPE composites approach to 4.415 × 10−3 and 0.690 × 10−3 emu/g, respectively. The magnetic moments of BiFeO3 fillers are arranged parallel to the magnetic field direction, leading to appreciable enhancement of the magnetic interactions between BiFeO3 fillers, which will inhibit the polarization of the electric dipole moments at the interface between BiFeO3 fillers and the LDPE matrix. Therefore, magnetization treatment results in the lower dielectric constant and higher dielectric loss of BiFeO3/LDPE composites. It is proven that the magnetic and dielectric properties of polymer dielectric composites can be effectively modified by the magnetization treatment in the melt blending process of preparing composites, which is expected to provide a technical strategy for developing magnetic polymer dielectrics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic and Hybrid Polymers)
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