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Advanced Materials for Multifunctional Applications, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Materials Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 2130

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Head of Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics and Robotics Department, "Gheorghe Asachi" Technical University of Iasi, 700050 Iasi, Romania
Interests: robotic applications of shape memory alloys; modeling and simulation; mechanisms and machine theory; robotics; mechanical engineering
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The properties of metallic alloys can be controlled via thermal, mechanical or thermomechanical processes. In recent years, researchers have developed advanced materials with significant improvements in their microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The impact of different microstructural aspects and corrosion resistance on the mechanical behavior of alloys is important to study in order to obtain high-performance materials. The aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest achievements in the theoretical and experimental investigations of the microstructural aspects, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in various metallic materials subjected to different processing methods; the latest advancements relating to their performance for various applications in the medical field, automotive industry, mechatronics and robotics are also highly relevant.

To further the success of this Special Issue of Materials, we are delighted to open a new Special Issue entitled “Advanced Materials for Multifunctional Applications, 2nd Edition”.

This second volume of the Special Issue aims to address the microstructural evolution and its impact on the mechanical and corrosion properties of advanced engineering alloys. Papers focusing on the processing techniques, modeling of the mechanical behavior, characterization of material microstructure, influence of corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, as well as advanced applications, are encouraged. Full papers, communications and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Corneliu Munteanu
Prof. Dr. Ioan Doroftei
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • multi-phase intermetallic alloys
  • Fe-, Mg-, Ti-, Cu-, Co-, Al-, Zn-based intermetallic alloys
  • microstructure characterization
  • mechanical properties (tensile strength, hardness, wear resistance, resilience, fatigue)
  • corrosion resistance and electrochemical analysis
  • high biocompatibility for medical applications
  • thermal analysis
  • heat treatments
  • the relationship between structure, properties and material applications

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 19465 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Cyclic Thermal Shocks at High Temperatures on the Microstructure, Hardness and Thermal Diffusivity of the Rene 41 Alloy
by Elisabeta Roxana Ungureanu Arva, Denis Aurelian Negrea, Andrei Galatanu, Magdalena Galatanu, Sorin Georgian Moga, Daniel-Constantin Anghel, Mihai Branzei, Livia Stoica, Alexandra Ion Jinga, Mircea Ionut Petrescu, Corneliu Munteanu and Marioara Abrudeanu
Materials 2024, 17(10), 2262; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17102262 - 10 May 2024
Viewed by 381
Abstract
The precipitation-hardenable nickel-based superalloy Rene 41 exhibits remarkable mechanical characteristics and high corrosion resistance at high temperatures, properties that allow it to be used in high-end applications. This research paper presents findings on the influence of thermal shocks on its microstructure, hardness, and [...] Read more.
The precipitation-hardenable nickel-based superalloy Rene 41 exhibits remarkable mechanical characteristics and high corrosion resistance at high temperatures, properties that allow it to be used in high-end applications. This research paper presents findings on the influence of thermal shocks on its microstructure, hardness, and thermal diffusivity at temperatures between 700 and 1000 °C. Solar energy was used for cyclic thermal shock tests. The samples were characterized using microhardness measurements, optical microscopic analysis, scanning electron microscopy coupled with EDS elemental chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, and flash thermal diffusivity measurements. Structural transformations and the variation of properties were observed with an increase in the number of shocks applied at the same temperature and with temperature variation for the same number of thermal shocks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Multifunctional Applications, 2nd Edition)
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21 pages, 61753 KiB  
Article
Considerations on the Failure Mechanisms at Fatigue Loading of 1018 Steel Samples Coated with Wip-C1 by Cold Spray
by Layth Alkisswani, Viorel Goanță, Corneliu Munteanu, Fayez Samara, Roxana Elena Cosau and Bogdan Istrate
Materials 2024, 17(8), 1868; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17081868 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 425
Abstract
There are some important advantages presented by metal specimens coated with WIP-C1 (Ni/CrC)-type materials. However, given the coating methods and the stress under dynamic loads, there are issues that need to be taken into account, particularly in terms of the behavior at the [...] Read more.
There are some important advantages presented by metal specimens coated with WIP-C1 (Ni/CrC)-type materials. However, given the coating methods and the stress under dynamic loads, there are issues that need to be taken into account, particularly in terms of the behavior at the interface between the two materials. Using standardized cylindrical 1018 steel specimens uniformly coated with WIP-C1 (Ni/CrC) by cold spraying, this study investigated the fatigue behavior of the specimen as a whole, focusing on the interface areas of the two materials. The fatigue life diagram is given, to a large extent, by the behavior of the base material. As a result, in this work, we have focused not so much on the fatigue behavior of the assembly as on the integrity of the coating material and the defects, failures, etc., that may occur at the interface after a certain number of cycles. The applied load was cyclic fatigue through alternating–symmetric cycles. Scanning optical microscopy was used to observe plastic deformations and crack propagation during the breakage process. It was found that both the base material zone and the cover material zone presented good performance when the maximum stresses were at low values. A fatigue durability curve was also plotted, showing a conventional appearance for a metallic material, slightly influenced by the destruction of the base material interface. At higher maximum stress and, consequently, to large strains, a series of destructions at the interface of the two materials, of different types, were observed and will be highlighted in the paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Multifunctional Applications, 2nd Edition)
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13 pages, 6218 KiB  
Article
Synthesis of FeSi–FeAl Composites from Separately Prepared FeSi and FeAl Alloys and Their Structure and Properties
by Pavel Novák, Jiří Duda, Filip Průša, Kateřina Skotnicová, Ivo Szurman and Bedřich Smetana
Materials 2023, 16(24), 7685; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16247685 - 17 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1007
Abstract
Composites consisting of iron aluminide and iron silicide phases were studied in this work. Powders of iron aluminide and iron silicide were prepared by mechanical alloying separately. Subsequently, they were blended in three different proportions and sintered by the SPS method under various [...] Read more.
Composites consisting of iron aluminide and iron silicide phases were studied in this work. Powders of iron aluminide and iron silicide were prepared by mechanical alloying separately. Subsequently, they were blended in three different proportions and sintered by the SPS method under various conditions. After sintering, the composites are composed of FeAl and amounts of other silicides (Fe5Si3 and Fe3Si). Ternary Fe–Al–Si phases were not determined, even though their presence was predicted by DFT calculations. This disagreement was explained by steric factors, i.e., by differences in the space lattice of the present phases. Hardness and tribological properties were measured on composites with various weight ratios of iron aluminide and iron silicide. The results show that sintered silicides with the matrix composed of iron aluminide reach comparable hardness to tool steels. The composites with higher mass ratios of iron aluminide than silicide have higher hardness and better tribological properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Multifunctional Applications, 2nd Edition)
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