Special Issue "Marine Bioactive Natural Product Studies in Asia"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yoshihide Usami
Website
Guest Editor
Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094, Japan
Interests: marine natural product; total synthesis; structural determination; bioactive; small molecule; azole
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Searching for marine bioactive natural products is an important task in natural product chemistry, medicinal chemistry or for drug discovery which has recently been developing progressively worldwide. This is particularly of relevance in Asia where scientists have the possibility of finding structurally unique or biologically important metabolites as they are surrounded by the sea. This Special Issue in Marine Drugs highlights the isolation and structural determination of bioactive natural products from marine animals, plants, or marine derived microorganisms collected from the Asian seas.

As the Guest Editor, I encourage marine natural products scientists from all over Asia to submit their latest research findings to show the strength of their knowledge in this field, and hope these contributions will assist in drug discoveries of the future.

Prof. Dr. Yoshihide Usami
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Asia
  • Natural Products
  • Isolation
  • Bioactive
  • Structure

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Bioactive Cembranoids from the Soft Coral Genus Sinularia sp. in Borneo
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(4), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16040099 - 21 Mar 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
Soft corals are known to be prolific producers of a wide spectrum of biologically active cembranoids. One new cembranoid, sinularolide F (2), along with three known compounds, cembranolide (1), (E,E,E)-6,10,14-trimethyl-3-methylene-cis-3α,4,5,8,9,12,13,15α-octahydrocyclo tetradeca[β]furan-2( [...] Read more.
Soft corals are known to be prolific producers of a wide spectrum of biologically active cembranoids. One new cembranoid, sinularolide F (2), along with three known compounds, cembranolide (1), (E,E,E)-6,10,14-trimethyl-3-methylene-cis-3α,4,5,8,9,12,13,15α-octahydrocyclo tetradeca[β]furan-2(3H)-one (3), and denticulatolide (4), were isolated from the Bornean soft coral Sinularia sp. Compounds 2 and 4 showed potential anti-inflammatory activities against lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 with IC50 values less than 6.25 µg/mL and anticancer activity against HL60 cell lines. The compounds’ mechanisms of action were investigated via the Western blot evaluation of their protein markers. These activities could be attributed to the presence of tertiary methyl at C-8 and the compounds’ 3D configurations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Bioactive Natural Product Studies in Asia)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Three New Malyngamides from the Marine Cyanobacterium Moorea producens
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(12), 367; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15120367 - 29 Nov 2017
Cited by 11
Abstract
Three new compounds of the malyngamide series, 6,8-di-O-acetylmalyngamide 2 (1), 6-O-acetylmalyngamide 2 (2), and N-demethyl-isomalyngamide I (3), were isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic [...] Read more.
Three new compounds of the malyngamide series, 6,8-di-O-acetylmalyngamide 2 (1), 6-O-acetylmalyngamide 2 (2), and N-demethyl-isomalyngamide I (3), were isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis and chemical derivatization and degradation. These compounds stimulated glucose uptake in cultured L6 myotubes. In particular, 6,8-di-O-acetylmalyngamide 2 (1) showed potent activity and activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Bioactive Natural Product Studies in Asia)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Bioactive Diphenyl Ethers and Isocoumarin Derivatives from a Gorgonian-Derived Fungus Phoma sp. (TA07-1)
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(6), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15060146 - 25 May 2017
Cited by 12
Abstract
Three new diphenyl ether derivatives—phomaethers A–C (13) and five known compounds—including a diphenyl ether analog, 2,3′-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-5′,6-dimethyl diphenyl ether (4); and four isocoumarin derivatives, diaportinol (5), desmethyldiaportinol (6), citreoisocoumarinol (7), and citreoisocoumarin [...] Read more.
Three new diphenyl ether derivatives—phomaethers A–C (13) and five known compounds—including a diphenyl ether analog, 2,3′-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-5′,6-dimethyl diphenyl ether (4); and four isocoumarin derivatives, diaportinol (5), desmethyldiaportinol (6), citreoisocoumarinol (7), and citreoisocoumarin (8)—were isolated from a gorgonian-derived fungus Phoma sp. (TA07-1). Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic investigation. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were determined by acid hydrolysis reactions. It was the first report to discover the diphenyl glycoside derivatives from coral-derived fungi. Compounds 1, 3, and 4 showed selective strong antibacterial activity against five pathogenic bacteria with the minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) values and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values between 0.156 and 10.0 μM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Bioactive Natural Product Studies in Asia)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
An Unusual Diterpene—Enhygromic Acid and Deoxyenhygrolides from a Marine Myxobacterium, Enhygromyxa sp.
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15040109 - 06 Apr 2017
Cited by 11
Abstract
Three new compounds, enhygromic acid (1) and deoxyenhygrolides A (2) and B (3), were isolated from a marine myxobacterium, Enhygromyxa sp. Compound 1 was found to be an acrylic acid derivative with a rare polycyclic carbon skeleton, [...] Read more.
Three new compounds, enhygromic acid (1) and deoxyenhygrolides A (2) and B (3), were isolated from a marine myxobacterium, Enhygromyxa sp. Compound 1 was found to be an acrylic acid derivative with a rare polycyclic carbon skeleton, decahydroacenaphthylene, by spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 2 and 3 were deoxy analogs of the known γ-alkylidenebutenolides, enhygrolides. Compound 1 exhibited cytotoxicity against B16 melanoma cells and anti-bacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, and enhanced the NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Bioactive Natural Product Studies in Asia)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Structural Determinant and Its Underlying Molecular Mechanism of STPC2 Related to Anti-Angiogenic Activity
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15020048 - 21 Feb 2017
Cited by 7
Abstract
In this study, we aimed to use different strategies to further uncover the anti-angiogenic molecular mechanism of a fucoidan-like polysaccharide STPC2, isolated from brown alga Sargassum thunbergii. A desulfated derivative, STPC2-DeS, was successfully prepared and identified. The native polysaccharide and desulfated product [...] Read more.
In this study, we aimed to use different strategies to further uncover the anti-angiogenic molecular mechanism of a fucoidan-like polysaccharide STPC2, isolated from brown alga Sargassum thunbergii. A desulfated derivative, STPC2-DeS, was successfully prepared and identified. The native polysaccharide and desulfated product were subjected to evaluate their anti-angiogenic effects. In the tube formation assay, STPC2 showed dose-dependent inhibition. In addition, STPC2 could distinctly inhibit the permeation of HUVEC cells into the lower chamber. Moreover, a significant reduction of microvessel density was observed in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay treated with STPC2. Meanwhile, STPC2 was found to repress the VEGF-induced neovessel formation in the matrigel plug assay in vivo. However, STPC2-DeS failed to suppress the anti-angiogenic activity via these in vitro and in vivo strategies. In addition, we demonstrated that STPC2 could significantly downregulate the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its related downstream Src family kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and AKT kinase. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance assay revealed that STPC2 bound strongly to VEGF to interfere with VEGF–VEGFR2 interaction. Taken together, these results evidently demonstrated that STPC2 exhibited a potent anti-angiogenic activity through binding to VEGF via sulfated groups to impede VEGF–VEGFR2 interaction, thus affected the downstream signaling molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Bioactive Natural Product Studies in Asia)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop