Special Issue "Marine Lipids with Biological Interest"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gilles Barnathan
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Guest Editor
College of Pharmacy, University of Nantes, Nantes, France
Interests: marine lipids with biological activity and with interest in human health and nutrition; bioactive glycolipids; fatty acid and sterol compositions; marine sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids; analytical methods in structure determination and lipidomics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gaetane Wielgosz-Collin
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
College of Pharmacy, University of Nantes, Nantes, France
Interests: marine lipids with biological activity and with interest in human health and nutrition; bioactive glycolipids; fatty acid and sterol compositions; marine sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids; analytical methods in structure determination and lipidomics
Dr. Aurelie Couzinet-Mossion
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
College of Pharmacy, University of Nantes, Nantes, France
Interests: marine lipids with biological activity and with interest in human health and nutrition; bioactive glycolipids; fatty acid and sterol compositions; marine sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids; analytical methods in structure determination and lipidomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since 2013, Marine Drugs has published Special Issues devoted to marine lipids, which are important representatives of the fascinating marine chemical biodiversity, as well as sources of a large set of new molecules of interest. A previous Special Issue on “Marine Lipids” recently published 29 various papers, including five review articles. This Special Issue entitled “Marine Lipids with Biological Interest” welcomes research articles and comprehensive reviews providing new results in this large field of research.

The welcomed contributions will provide noticeable extensions of knowledge from various points of view, such as chemotaxonomy, biosynthetic pathways, or marine food web. However, we hope that the articles will also concern the great potential of particular lipids as bioactive substances in nutrition and health. Indeed, since the last decades, the family of bioactive lipids clearly widened.

From these latter points of view, the most interesting marine organisms are probably invertebrates and algae. Furthermore, the welcomed contributions can concern various lipid classes, including phospholipids, glycolipids, fatty acids, sterols or yet oxylipins. Nevertheless, this Special Issue would be also interested to publish important results arising from a lipidomic approach allowing the global characterization of the lipid classes and their biological potential.

As Guest Editors, we invite colleagues working on marine lipids to contribute to this Special Issue of Marine Drugs with interesting papers showing significant advances within this field. Selected papers from this conference "Lipids in the Ocean" (https://marinelipids.sciencesconf.org/) will also be considered to be published in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Gilles Barnathan
Dr. Gaetane Wielgosz-Collin
Dr. Aurelie Couzinet-Mossion
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lipids
  • lipidomics
  • glycolipids
  • phospholipids
  • oxylipins
  • fatty acids
  • sterols
  • marine organisms
  • marine algae
  • marine chemical ecology
  • biosynthetic pathways
  • biomarkers
  • biological interest
  • biological activity

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lipids Extracted from Arctoscopus japonicus Eggs on LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(10), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17100580 - 11 Oct 2019
Abstract
Arctoscopus japonicus is a cold-water marine fish. The present study investigated the fatty acid composition of A. japonicus egg lipids and their anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-stimulated RAW246.7 macrophages. The results showed that A. japonicus egg lipids contained primarily polyunsaturated fatty acids (52.9% of [...] Read more.
Arctoscopus japonicus is a cold-water marine fish. The present study investigated the fatty acid composition of A. japonicus egg lipids and their anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-stimulated RAW246.7 macrophages. The results showed that A. japonicus egg lipids contained primarily polyunsaturated fatty acids (52.9% of the total fatty acid content; mostly eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA, 21.2 ± 0.5%] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA, 25.9 ± 0.1%]), followed by monounsaturated fatty acids and saturated fatty acids (23.7% and 23.4%, respectively). A. japonicus egg lipids significantly decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and suppressed the expression of immune-associated genes such as iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α LPS-stimulated RAW246.7 macrophages in dose-dependent manner. A. japonicus egg lipids also reduced the phosphorylation levels of NF-κB p-65, p38, ERK1/2, and JNK, key components of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, suggesting that the lipid-induced anti-inflammatory activity is related to these signaling pathways. These results indicate that the lipids extracted from A. japonicus eggs have potential biofunctions and might be useful for regulating inflammation in macrophages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Lipids with Biological Interest)
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Open AccessArticle
Isolation, Characterization and Biotechnological Potentials of Thraustochytrids from Icelandic Waters
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(8), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17080449 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
The following study reports on the first thraustochytrid isolates identified from Iceland. They were collected from three different locations off the northern coast of the country (Location A, Skagaströnd; Location B, Hveravík; and Location C, Eyjafjörður). Using 18S rDNA sequence analysis, isolates from [...] Read more.
The following study reports on the first thraustochytrid isolates identified from Iceland. They were collected from three different locations off the northern coast of the country (Location A, Skagaströnd; Location B, Hveravík; and Location C, Eyjafjörður). Using 18S rDNA sequence analysis, isolates from Locations A and B were identified within the Thraustochytrium kinnei species while other isolates within the Sicyoidochytrium minutum species when compared to other known strains. Cells isolated from Locations A ( 2.10 ± 0.70 g/L) and B ( 1.54 ± 0.17 g/L) produced more biomass than the ones isolated from Location C ( 0.43 ± 0.02 g/L). This study offers the first-time examination of the utility of byproducts from fisheries as a nitrogen source in media formulation for thraustochytrids. Experiments showed that isolates produced more biomass (per unit of substrate) when cultured on nitrogen of marine ( 2.55 ± 0.74 g/L) as compared to of commercial origin ( 1.06 ± 0.57 g/L). Glycerol ( 2.43 ± 0.56 g/L) was a better carbon source than glucose ( 1.84 ± 0.57 g/L) in growth studies. Fatty acid (FA) profiles showed that the isolates from Location C (S. minutum) had low ratios of monounsaturated ( 4.21 ± 2.96 % ) and omega-6 ( 0.68 ± 0.59 % ) FAs. However, the isolates also had high ratios of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 35.65 ± 1.73 % ) and total omega-3 FAs ( 40.39 ± 2.39 % ), indicating that they could serve as a source of marine oils for human consumption and in aquaculture feeds. The T. kinnei isolates from Location A could be used in biodiesel production due to their high ratios of monounsaturated ( 18.38 ± 6.27 % ) long chain ( 57.43 ± 8.27 % ) FAs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Lipids with Biological Interest)
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Open AccessArticle
Steroids from Marine-Derived Fungi: Evaluation of Antiproliferative and Antimicrobial Activities of Eburicol
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(6), 372; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17060372 - 21 Jun 2019
Abstract
The most common sterol in fungi is ergosterol, which has frequently been investigated in human pathogenic fungal strains. This sterol, and others isolated from fungal strains, has also demonstrated cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines and antimicrobial activities. Marine fungi can produce high amounts [...] Read more.
The most common sterol in fungi is ergosterol, which has frequently been investigated in human pathogenic fungal strains. This sterol, and others isolated from fungal strains, has also demonstrated cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines and antimicrobial activities. Marine fungi can produce high amounts of bioactive compounds. So, a screening was performed to study sterol composition using GC/MS in 19 marine fungal strains and ergosterol was always the major one. One strain, Clonostachys rosea MMS1090, was selected due to its high amount of eburicol and a one strain many compounds approach was performed on seven culture media to optimize its production. After purification and structural identification by NMR, eburicol was assessed against four cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, NSCLC-N6-L16 and A549, and seven human pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus sp., Bacillus cereus, Listeria ivanovii, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter freundii and Salmonella spp. The most significant activity was cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells (2 µM). This is the first report of such an accumulation of eburicol in the marine fungal strain C. rosea confirming its potential in the production of bioactive lipids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Lipids with Biological Interest)
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Open AccessArticle
Lipidomic Signatures Reveal Seasonal Shifts on the Relative Abundance of High-Valued Lipids from the Brown Algae Fucus vesiculosus
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(6), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17060335 - 04 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Fucus vesiculosus is an edible brown macroalga, with health benefits associated with its consumption and also a source of bioactive molecules. It is acknowledged that the biochemical composition of macroalgae changes when exposed to different environmental conditions occurring on different habitats, such as [...] Read more.
Fucus vesiculosus is an edible brown macroalga, with health benefits associated with its consumption and also a source of bioactive molecules. It is acknowledged that the biochemical composition of macroalgae changes when exposed to different environmental conditions occurring on different habitats, such as the water temperature, and light intensity. In the present study, the polar lipidome of Fucus vesiculosus was characterized for the first time using modern high-resolution HILIC–MS, and MS/MS approaches, to evaluate the phenotypic variability in two seasons of the year, e.g., winter and spring. A total of 187 molecular species were identified over eighteen classes of glycolipids, phospholipids and betaine lipids. Principal component analysis (PCA) multivariate statistical analysis and cluster analysis of polar lipid classes, polar lipid species and total fatty acids (FA) datasets, showed clustering according to the seasonal groups. While the lipid profile of Fucus vesiculosus harvested in the winter and spring yielded the same molecular species, the relative abundance of these species was significantly different. In the winter, changes were mainly due to the increased relative abundance of some molecular species of glycolipids and phospholipids, bearing octadeca(poly)enoic (18:3, 18:4) and eicosa(poly)enoic (20:4, 20:5) FA and betaine lipids species with short saturated FA (14:0) and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA). Importantly, glycolipids with n-3 PUFA and sulfolipids, have been reported to have important biological activities and therapeutic value. Overall, Fucus vesiculosus is a promising source of bioactive compounds that can be used as functional food or ingredients for human nutrition, feed, pharma, and cosmetic formulations. In this study, samples harvested in the winter season maximized yields of these bioactive components, when compared with samples harvested in the spring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Lipids with Biological Interest)
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Open AccessArticle
Dokdolipids A−C, Hydroxylated Rhamnolipids from the Marine-Derived Actinomycete Actinoalloteichus hymeniacidonis
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(4), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17040237 - 20 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Three new hydroxylated rhamnolipids, dokdolipids A−C (13) were obtained from the marine actinomycete Actinoalloteichus hymeniacidonis, which was isolated from a sediment sample collected off the coasts of Dokdo island, Republic of Korea. The structures of the isolated compounds [...] Read more.
Three new hydroxylated rhamnolipids, dokdolipids A−C (13) were obtained from the marine actinomycete Actinoalloteichus hymeniacidonis, which was isolated from a sediment sample collected off the coasts of Dokdo island, Republic of Korea. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectrometric data analyses. Their absolute configurations were assigned using the modified Mosher’s method and specific rotation values, as well as acid hydrolysis, chemical derivatizations and subsequent HPLC analysis to determine the configuration of the sugar moieties. All new compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against six cancer cell lines, HCT-15, NUGC-3, NCI-H23, ACHN, PC-3 and MDA-MB-231. Compounds 13 displayed moderate cytotoxicity against all the cell lines tested with IC50 values ranging from 13.7−41.5 µM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Lipids with Biological Interest)
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Open AccessArticle
Immune-Enhancement and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Fatty Acids Extracted from Halocynthia aurantium Tunic in RAW264.7 Cells
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(9), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16090309 - 01 Sep 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Halocynthia aurantium, an edible ascidian species, has not been studied scientifically, even though tunicates and ascidians are well-known to contain several unique and biologically active materials. The current study investigated the fatty acid profiles of the H. aurantium tunic and its immune-regulatory [...] Read more.
Halocynthia aurantium, an edible ascidian species, has not been studied scientifically, even though tunicates and ascidians are well-known to contain several unique and biologically active materials. The current study investigated the fatty acid profiles of the H. aurantium tunic and its immune-regulatory effects on RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Results of the fatty acid profile analysis showed a difference in ratios, depending on the fatty acids being analysed, including those of saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). In particular, omega-3 fatty acids, such as eicosatrienoic acid n-3 (ETA n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), were much higher than omega-6 fatty acids. Moreover, the H. aurantium tunic fatty acids, significantly and dose-dependently, increased the NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in RAW264.7 cells, for immune-enhancement without cytotoxicity. In addition, these fatty acids regulated the transcription of immune-associated genes, including iNOS, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and TNF-α. These actions were activated and deactivated via Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)and NF-κB signaling, to regulate the immune responses. Conversely, the H. aurantium tunic fatty acids effectively suppressed the inflammatory cytokine expressions, including iNOS, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and TNF-α, in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Productions of COX-2 and PGE2, which are key biomarkers for inflammation, were also significantly reduced. These results elucidated the immune-enhancement and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the H. aurantium tunic fatty acids in macrophage cells. Moreover, the H. aurantium tunic might be a potential fatty acid source for immune-modulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Lipids with Biological Interest)
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