Polysaccharides from Marine Environment

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Pharmacology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1852

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Marine Life Sciences, Jeju National University, Jeju 63243, Republic of Korea
2. Marine Science Institute, Jeju National University, Jeju 63333, Republic of Korea
Interests: polysaccharides, fucoidans, carrageenans, ulvans, agars, alginic acids, chitins and chitosans, chondroitin sulfates, glucosaminoglycans, marine organism; prevention or improvement of disorders; functionalities, bioactivities, bioavailabilities
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine biodiversity and marine organisms are vital components of nature. Their potential is highly appreciated in functional foods and pharmaceutical industries. The structures of various polysaccharides obtained from marine resources greatly impact their valuable applications. Marine plants, animals, and microorganisms have rich sources of polysaccharides. Based on the origin, we can find marine animal polysaccharides (chitin, chitosan, chondroitin sulfate, marine glycosaminoglycans), marine plant polysaccharides (brown algae: fucoidan, alginate, laminarin; red algae: carrageenan, agar; green algae: ulvan), and marine microbial polysaccharides (exopolysaccharides, structural polysaccharides, intracellular polysaccharides). This Special Issue, “Polysaccharides from Marine Environment”, will be published in the journal of Marine Drugs. The focus will be on defining the extraction of polysaccharides, identifying their structures, and recognizing their effectiveness in different bioactivities to make functional foods, and pharmaceuticals in the future.

Prof. Dr. You-Jin Jeon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • polysaccharides
  • marine environments
  • extraction and isolation techniques
  • modification techniques
  • structures
  • bioactivities
  • functional foods
  • prevention
  • improvement
  • disorders

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 3785 KiB  
Article
Purification and Structural Analyses of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Low-Value Sea Cucumber Stichopus naso and Anticoagulant Activities of Its Oligosaccharides
by Lige Cui, Huifang Sun, Xiaolei Shang, Jing Wen, Pengfei Li, Shengtao Yang, Linxia Chen, Xiangyang Huang, Haoyang Li, Ronghua Yin and Jinhua Zhao
Mar. Drugs 2024, 22(6), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/md22060265 - 8 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Three polysaccharides (SnNG, SnFS and SnFG) were purified from the body wall of Stichopus naso. The physicochemical properties, including monosaccharide composition, molecular weight, sulfate content, and optical rotation, were analyzed, confirming that SnFS and SnFG are sulfated polysaccharides commonly found in sea [...] Read more.
Three polysaccharides (SnNG, SnFS and SnFG) were purified from the body wall of Stichopus naso. The physicochemical properties, including monosaccharide composition, molecular weight, sulfate content, and optical rotation, were analyzed, confirming that SnFS and SnFG are sulfated polysaccharides commonly found in sea cucumbers. The highly regular structure {3)-L-Fuc2S-(α1,}n of SnFS was determined via a detailed NMR analysis of its oxidative degradation product. By employing β-elimination depolymerization of SnFG, tri-, penta-, octa-, hendeca-, tetradeca-, and heptadeca-saccharides were obtained from the low-molecular-weight product. Their well-defined structures confirmed that SnFG possessed the backbone of {D-GalNAc4S6S-β(1,4)-D-GlcA}, and each GlcA residue was branched with Fuc2S4S. SnFS and SnFG are both structurally the simplest version of natural fucan sulfate and fucosylated glycosaminoglycan, facilitating the application of low-value sea cucumbers S. naso. Bioactivity assays showed that SnFG and its derived oligosaccharides exhibited potent anticoagulation and intrinsic factor Xase (iXase) inhibition. Moreover, a comparative analysis with the series of oligosaccharides solely branched with Fuc3S4S showed that in oligosaccharides with lower degrees of polymerization, such as octasaccharides, Fuc2S4S led to a greater increase in APTT prolongation and iXase inhibition. As the degree of polymerization increases, the influence from the sulfation pattern diminishes, until it is overshadowed by the effects of molecular weight. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharides from Marine Environment)
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24 pages, 7591 KiB  
Article
Effects of Polymannuronic Acid on the Intestinal Microbiota in Mice after Long-Term Intragastric Administration
by E Zhang, Qiang Wei, Xia Li and Shuliang Song
Mar. Drugs 2024, 22(3), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/md22030125 - 6 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Polymannuronic acid (PM) is an alginate oligosaccharide derived from brown algae with a characterized structure and excellent biological activities. Herein, mice were given different doses of PM through 30-day-long-term intragastric administration, and the contents of the jejunum, ileum, and colon were analyzed by [...] Read more.
Polymannuronic acid (PM) is an alginate oligosaccharide derived from brown algae with a characterized structure and excellent biological activities. Herein, mice were given different doses of PM through 30-day-long-term intragastric administration, and the contents of the jejunum, ileum, and colon were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing technology for microbial diversity, and relevant experiments were verified according to the analysis results so as to comprehensively evaluate the effects of PM on the intestinal flora. The PM (400 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg) could regulate the microflora balance at the phylum level and increase the microflora richness in the jejunum, ileum, and colon of the mice. The PM could induce more strains that are negatively correlated with Escherichia, thereby reducing the relative abundance of Escherichia. Analysis of bacterial function showed that high and low doses of PM could promote lipid metabolism in the bacterial communities. Moreover, the PM could reduce serum total cholesterol and cholesterol ester levels in a concentration-dependent manner. High-dose PM could lead to colonic intestinal inflammation by increasing the relative abundance of multiple bacterial groups in the jejunum, ileum, and colon. Moreover, high-dose PM could increase lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and interleukin-1β levels. Therefore, the dose of PM plays an important role in its efficacy, and its biological activity is dosedifferent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polysaccharides from Marine Environment)
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