Mathematical Methods and Data Analysis in Health and Biomedical Sciences: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 797

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Gdańsk, 80-210 Gdańsk, Poland
Interests: bioinformatics; graphical representations of biological sequences; computational statistics; mathematical modeling in medicine, physics, astronomy; computational pharmacology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Radiological Informatics and Statistics, Medical University of Gdańsk, 80-210 Gdańsk, Poland
Interests: bioinformatics; graphical representations of biological sequences; biophysics; mathematical modeling in biomedical and social sciences; health and biomedical informatics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The first volume of the Special Issue “Mathematical Methods and Data Analysis in Health and Biomedical Sciences” (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/life/special_issues/MMDA)  was an success, and it is our pleasure to announce the second volume.

The increasing importance of the mathematical modeling of the applications of computational methods and data analysis in medical sciences (and vice versa) has attracted the attention of both medical scientists and mathematicians. Though the worlds of mathematical and health sciences are not separated anymore, a full synergy effect is far from being reached. Frequently, it is difficult to find a proper balance between the expectations of the medical community and limitations of the computational methods that are currently available. In many cases, computer scientists and experts on mathematical modeling are not aware of the medical problems that might be solved using mathematical methods. Additionally, medical scientists do not always look for aid in finding answers to their questions in mathematics. There exists a large and little explored area of possible extensions of the applicability of different computational techniques in medical sciences. The most natural extensions include the development of higher accuracy methods and the implementation of new approaches that reveal some unknown (also unexpected) aspects of the considered subjects.

The present Special Issue of Life is aimed at the extension of areas where mathematics and medical sciences overlap and support each other. The submitted original and review articles may contain descriptions of mathematical models, of computational methods, and of new algorithms or may discuss the significance of some specific mathematics-based approaches in medical sciences. Papers dealing with medical data analysis, in particular with different aspects of graphical and numerical representations of the data and discussing various applications of the computational methods in different branches of medicine, in quality of life research, public health, bioinformatics, etc., are welcome.

Review articles should be comprehensive. The main text of review papers should be a minimum of 4000 words and include at least two figures or tables. Research articles should have a main text that is 3000 words minimum and should have more than 30 references. Life has no restrictions on the maximum length of research manuscripts, provided that the text is concise and comprehensive.

  1. Manuscripts should present an important novelty of the content and high potential impact in the relevant field of research;
  2. They should have a high standard of English (expression, grammar, and spelling);
  3. The experiment design should be sound and thorough, and the methodology should be described in detail to guarantee the reproducibility of the study;
  4. For all Western blot figures, the densitometry readings/intensity ratio of each band should be included. In addition, the whole blot (uncropped blots) showing all the bands with all molecular weight markers on the Western blot should be included in the Supplemental Materials;
  5. Manuscripts should include the reference of approval by the ethical committee for experimental studies.

Prof. Dr. Piotr Wąż
Prof. Dr. Dorota Bielińska-Wąż
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mathematical modeling
  • graphical representations of data and of research outcomes
  • computational statistics
  • health and biomedical informatics
  • bioinformatics methods
  • techniques in data analysis
  • data interpretation
  • applications of computational methods in health and medical sciences

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1319 KiB  
Article
Partial Hepatectomy and Ablation for Survival of Early-Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients: A Bayesian Emulation Analysis
by Jiping Wang, Yunju Im, Rong Wang and Shuangge Ma
Life 2024, 14(6), 661; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14060661 - 22 May 2024
Viewed by 383
Abstract
Partial hepatectomy and ablation therapy are two widely used surgical procedures for localized early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. This article aimed to evaluate their relative effectiveness in terms of overall survival. An emulation analysis approach was first developed based on the Bayesian technique. [...] Read more.
Partial hepatectomy and ablation therapy are two widely used surgical procedures for localized early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. This article aimed to evaluate their relative effectiveness in terms of overall survival. An emulation analysis approach was first developed based on the Bayesian technique. We estimated propensity scores via Bayesian logistic regression and adopted a weighted Bayesian Weibull accelerated failure time (AFT) model incorporating prior information contained in the published literature. With the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, an emulated target trial with rigorously defined inclusion/exclusion criteria and treatment regimens for early-stage HCC patients over 66 years old was developed. For the main cohort with tumor size less than or equal to 5 cm, a total of 1146 patients were enrolled in the emulated trial, with 301 and 845 in the partial hepatectomy and ablation arms, respectively. The analysis suggested ablation to be significantly associated with inferior overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.35; 95% credible interval [CrI]: 1.14, 1.60). For the subgroup with tumor size less than or equal to 3 cm, there was no significant difference in overall survival between the two arms (HR = 1.15; 95% CrI: 0.88, 1.52). Overall, the comparative treatment effect of ablation and partial hepatectomy on survival remains inconclusive. This finding may provide further insight into HCC clinical treatment. Full article
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