Clinical Research on Male Reproduction

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2024) | Viewed by 924

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, 95123 Catania, Italy
Interests: male infertility; male fertility; male reproduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Infertility is a major public health problem that has become increasingly important in recent years, with the World Health Organization estimating that 1 in 6 couples are affected by it. In 50% of cases, a male factor is the cause of this condition; however, even today, it is not possible to identify the cause in approximately 50% of cases, falling under the definition of idiopathic infertility. This Special Issue aims to analyze the main issues in the field of male reproduction that still require careful evaluation by the scientific community, new research insights into this topic and the possible future directions to be followed to improve the knowledge on the relevant pathogenesis and therapeutic management.

Dr. Andrea Crafa
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • male infertility
  • male fertility
  • male sub-fertility
  • idiopathic male infertility
  • male reproduction

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

16 pages, 810 KiB  
Review
Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Human Male Gametes: Damage or Benefit
by Tsvetomira Dimitrova, Elena Hristova and Nadya Petrova
Life 2024, 14(7), 830; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14070830 - 28 Jun 2024
Viewed by 683
Abstract
With the improvement of medical devices for diagnosis and radiotherapy, concerns about the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation are also growing. There is no consensus among scientists on whether they might have beneficial effects on humans in certain cases or pose [...] Read more.
With the improvement of medical devices for diagnosis and radiotherapy, concerns about the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation are also growing. There is no consensus among scientists on whether they might have beneficial effects on humans in certain cases or pose more risks, making the exposure unreasonable. While the damaging consequences of high-dose radiation have been known since the discovery of radioactivity, low-dose effects present a much bigger investigative challenge. They are highly specific and include radio-adaptive responses, bystander effects, and genomic instability. Current data regarding the consequences of exposure to low-dose radiation on the quality of male gametes and fertility potential are contradictory. The reports suggest two directions: indirect impact on male gametes—through spermatogenesis—or direct effects at low doses on already mature spermatozoa. Although mature gametes are used for observation in both models, they are fundamentally different, leading to varied results. Due to their unique physiological characteristics, in certain cases, exposure of spermatozoa to low-dose ionizing radiation could have positive effects. Despite the findings indicating no beneficial effects of low-dose exposure on male fertility, it is essential to research its impact on mature spermatozoa, as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research on Male Reproduction)
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