Imaging Methods in Metabolic Conditions

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 1329

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Clinical Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Split, Split, Croatia
Interests: CT; ultrasound; cardiothoracic imaging; abdominal imaging
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Guest Editor
Clinical Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Split, Split, Croatia
Interests: CT; MRI; neuroradiology; head and neck radiology

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Guest Editor
Clinical Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Split, Split, Croatia
Interests: CT; MRI; neuroradiology; head and neck radiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diseases with metabolic components, such as cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, and obesity together account for most of the morbidity and mortality worldwide despite significant improvements in treatment. Pathophysiological mechanisms that connect atherosclerosis, excess weight and bone loss are complex. Bone loss is associated with both atherosclerosis and vascular calcification, and several studies showed that the association is independent of aging and other common risk factors. The effect of excess body weight on bone microarchitecture is more contradictory yet unclear. On the other hand, anatomic and functional imaging methods, especially computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound, are used increasingly in the diagnosis or follow up of many diseases with metabolic components. We think the imaging techniques might help to understand the physiology and pathophysiology of metabolic functions and their disorders.

This Special Issue is dedicated to understanding the connections between common metabolic conditions, with an emphasis on the use of different imaging techniques that will help understand complex interrelationships between risk factors and common pathophysiological mechanisms for the development of cardiovascular diseases, excess body weight and bone loss.

Dr. Danijela Budimir Mršić
Dr. Sanja Lovrić Kojundžić
Dr. Maja Marinović Guić
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • bone
  • atherosclerotic plaque
  • body weight
  • adipose tissue
  • vascular calcification
  • CT
  • MRI
  • ultrasound

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 3829 KiB  
Article
Visceral and Ectopic Abdominal Fat Effect on the Calcification of the Abdominal Aorta and Its Branches—An MSCT Study
by Ivan Ordulj, Frano Šarić, Mirko Tandara, Kristian Jerković, Sanja Lovrić Kojundžić, Maja Marinović Guić, Miodrag Beneš and Danijela Budimir Mršić
Life 2024, 14(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14010002 - 19 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1008
Abstract
Visceral and ectopic fat accumulation might have an impact on the atherosclerotic calcification of abdominal arteries. The pattern of calcification of the abdominal aorta and its branches is not fully investigated. We retrospectively analyzed the abdominopelvic MSCT images and calculated calcification volumes of [...] Read more.
Visceral and ectopic fat accumulation might have an impact on the atherosclerotic calcification of abdominal arteries. The pattern of calcification of the abdominal aorta and its branches is not fully investigated. We retrospectively analyzed the abdominopelvic MSCT images and calculated calcification volumes of the abdominal aorta, celiac trunk, superior and inferior mesenteric arteries, and both common and external iliac arteries. On the same MSCT scans, a visceral fat volume and ectopic fat deposits (liver-to-spleen ratio (L/S) and pancreas-to-spleen (P/S) ratio) were also measured. The results showed that calcifications of the abdominal aorta and its branches were associated with visceral fat volume, less strongly associated with L/S, and not associated with the P/S ratio. The abdominal aorta, the common iliac and external iliac arteries were more calcified arteries compared to the celiac trunk and superior and mesenterial arteries. In conclusion, visceral fat has a stronger effect on abdominopelvic arteries’ calcification than ectopic fat. Visceral aortic branches are generally less calcified than iliac arteries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging Methods in Metabolic Conditions)
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