Effects of Physical Training on Youth Athletes' Physical Performance, Health and Well-Being

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 June 2024 | Viewed by 1885

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Polytechnic Institute of Viseu, Viseu, Portugal
Interests: youth sports; biological maturation; talent; movement variability

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Guest Editor
Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Musculoskeletal Science and Sports Medicine Research Center, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK
Interests: assessment and development of strength, power, multidirectional speed; injury prevention; maturation
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Guest Editor
Department of Communication and Education, Universidad Loyola Andalucía, Sevilla, Spain
Interests: assessment and development of strength, power, multidirectional speed; injury mitigation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Childhood and adolescence are thought to be critical periods in the development of physical capacities and the promotion of positive physiological, morphological, health and wellbeing adaptations in youth athletes as part of a long-term athlete development strategy.

In this Special Issue, we aim to provide a comprehensive understanding of the acute and longitudinal effects of various training interventions, such as resistance, plyometric, energy system, or multidirectional speed training, on the overall development of physical performance, health, and well-being in youth athletes. Each article will provide a unique perspective, employing experimental, observational, or longitudinal study designs, and consider quantitative assessments of athletic performance metrics, health markers, injury surrogate measures and/or a qualitative exploration of athletes' perceptual and psychological experiences. We also welcome applied reviews that provide examples of and recommendations regarding how to best enhance physical performance, mitigate injury risk, and improve health and well-being in youth athletes.

Researchers and practitioners alike will find valuable insights within this Special Issue, with the overall aim of providing evidence-based strategies that are able to optimize the development of youth athletes. The findings presented in this Special Issue contribute to the ongoing dialogue surrounding effective training protocols, fostering a holistic approach to youth sports that prioritizes not only performance excellence, but also the well-being of the athletes.

Prof. Dr. Jorge Arede
Dr. Thomas Dos'Santos
Prof. Dr. Oliver Gonzalo-Skok
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biological maturation
  • strength
  • endurance
  • speed
  • sleep
  • psychosocial
  • physical activity
  • conditioning
  • long-term athlete development
  • body composition

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1491 KiB  
Article
Relationships and Within-Group Differences in Physical Attributes and Golf Performance in Elite Amateur Female Players
by Luke Robinson, Andrew Murray, Daniel Coughlan, Margo Mountjoy, Rebecca Hembrough, Danny Glover, Fiona Scott, Anthony Turner and Chris Bishop
Life 2024, 14(6), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14060674 - 24 May 2024
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Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the association between a comprehensive physical testing battery and measures of golf performance in elite female amateur players. Nineteen category one (handicap ≤ 5) or better golfers (age: 16.26 ± 1.28 years, height: 166.26 [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to examine the association between a comprehensive physical testing battery and measures of golf performance in elite female amateur players. Nineteen category one (handicap ≤ 5) or better golfers (age: 16.26 ± 1.28 years, height: 166.26 ± 3.62 cm, mass: 64.04 ± 11.27 kg, wingspan: 146.53 ± 15.59 cm, handicap: +1.45 ± 0.7) volunteered to participate in this investigation. All golfers attended a single 90 min testing session where golf shot data (clubhead speed [CHS], ball speed, carry distance, and smash factor) were measured with a Trackman 4 launch monitor and a battery of physical assessments were carried out. These included anthropometric data and assessments for seated thoracic rotation, the isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP), isometric bench press, countermovement jump (CMJ), and seated medicine ball throws for distance. Pearson’s r correlations showed CHS was the golf metric that most commonly demonstrated large associations with physical testing data, most notably with force at 100 ms during the isometric bench press (r = 0.70). Median split analysis was also conducted for the IMTP (force at 200 ms), isometric bench press (force at 100 ms), and CMJ (positive impulse). The results showed that players who produced more force at 200 ms during the IMTP exhibited a greater CHS (g = 1.13), ball speed (g = 0.90), and carry distance (g = 1.01). In addition, players with a greater positive impulse during the CMJ showed a greater ball speed (g = 0.93), carry distance (g = 1.29), and smash factor (g = 1.27). Collectively, these results highlight the relevance of explosive force production capabilities in both the lower and upper body for female golfers. This information can be used by practitioners to better target key physical attributes during testing and training of female players. Full article
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12 pages, 278 KiB  
Article
Analysing the Influence of Speed and Jumping Performance Metrics on the Percentage Change of Direction Deficit in Adolescent Female Soccer Players
by Alberto Roso-Moliner, Oliver Gonzalo-Skok, Víctor Emilio Villavicencio Álvarez, Santiago Calero-Morales and Elena Mainer-Pardos
Life 2024, 14(4), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14040466 - 3 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Studies show that although female soccer players often have shorter change of direction (COD) deficits than males, indicating different biomechanical profiles, there is a lack of research on the impact of physical metrics on COD performance in females. The purpose of this work [...] Read more.
Studies show that although female soccer players often have shorter change of direction (COD) deficits than males, indicating different biomechanical profiles, there is a lack of research on the impact of physical metrics on COD performance in females. The purpose of this work was to analyse whether performance metrics based on speed and jumping could explain the variation in %CODD in young female soccer players. Thirty-three highly trained adolescent female soccer players with an age of 16 ± 0.95 years, a body mass of 55.7 ± 7.22 kg, and a height of 160.4 ± 5.22 cm performed COD180 tests, 10 m and 30 m sprint tests, single-leg countermovement, and horizontal jumps. Acceleration in the first 10 m of a sprint was identified as a significant predictor of COD180 performance (R2 = 28%), (R2 = 50%), (p < 0.01), indicating that early sprint performance may largely determine an individual’s ability to change direction. However, no predictors were found for %CODD. Significant correlations were observed between COD180 performance and %CODD, acceleration, linear speed, and horizontal jump performance (r = −0.59 to 0.70; p < 0.05). The study suggests that specific physical performance metrics, particularly early acceleration, are crucial for enhancing COD skills in female soccer players, emphasizing the need for targeted training interventions. Full article
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