Implications for Land System Governance for Sustainability

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Systems and Global Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (23 February 2024) | Viewed by 4322

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sociology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Interests: sociology of technology; space research; social governance and social policy; natural disasters; sustainable development
International Commerce, Global Leaders College, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea
Interests: cross-border M&A; learning and knowledge management of MNEs; international human resource management strategies; sustainable growth of MNEs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Land is a social-economic-technological system which integrates multiple meanings and values. How human societies use, manage, and interact with land is key to addressing current sustainability issues.

It is necessary to analyze the temporal and spatial changes of natural resources, the geographical environment, and land composition when approaching sustainable development. Meanwhile, understanding and explaining the complex relationships between human and land systems in different social contexts is also an important topic.

The aim of this Special Issue is to invite academics and practitioners to describe practical experiences and insights about implications for land system governance for sustainability.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Multi-faceted detections and analyses of land;
  • Land system dynamics;
  • Trade-offs among social, economic, and ecological benefits of land;
  • Landscape evolution;
  • Technologies in land use and land governance;
  • Sustainable human-land relationships;
  • Land policies and strategies for sustainability;
  • Urban space governance and sustainable development;
  • Rural governance and sustainable development;
  • Land governance in the digital age.

We encourage interdisciplinary papers from scientists, policy and decision makers, and practitioners who focus on land system governance. The contributions shall stimulate researching processes generally in order to foster an understanding of integrated sustainable development.

Prof. Dr. Chenggang Zhang
Dr. Yi Yang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land systems
  • social-ecological systems
  • social-economic-technological system
  • landscape design
  • sustainability
  • land-climate interaction
  • human-land relationships
  • governance
  • urban-rural interactions
  • urban planning and development
  • emerging technologies of data

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

22 pages, 7262 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Land Use Diagnosis Based on the Perspective of Coupling Socioeconomy and Ecology in the Xiongan New Area, China
by Xiaoxiao Wang, Huafu Zhao, Jiacheng Qian, Xiao Li, Congjie Cao, Zhe Feng and Yiqing Cui
Land 2024, 13(1), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13010092 - 13 Jan 2024
Viewed by 728
Abstract
Analysis of land use sustainability (LUS) coupling socioeconomic and ecological systems has drawn the interest of researchers and decision-makers concerned with sustainable development. Exploring the relationships between land use systems can offer a coordinated route for localized and effective land governance strategies. We [...] Read more.
Analysis of land use sustainability (LUS) coupling socioeconomic and ecological systems has drawn the interest of researchers and decision-makers concerned with sustainable development. Exploring the relationships between land use systems can offer a coordinated route for localized and effective land governance strategies. We proposed a new theoretical framework for LUS considering coordinated development between socioeconomy and ecology. We applied it further to the Xiongan New Area, typical of a new region with government-led construction in eastern China, to explore in depth the coupling and coordination relationship among land use systems and their driving factors. Results revealed that: (1) ecological sustainability grew while socioeconomic sustainability declined in most areas of Xiongan New Area during 2010–2020 at the township level, (2) relationships among land use systems in 2010–2020 showed a trend of coordinated development, but generally, their coordination was still only at a primary and moderate level, with a shift from prominent ecological lag to prominent socioeconomic lag, (3) economic factors are critical to the coordinated development of land use systems, while the influence of ecological factors is also increasing, and (4) four development types were identified for the towns: coupling and developed, coupling and undeveloped, tradeoff and developed, and tradeoff and undeveloped. Policymakers can better appreciate the importance of government interventions in future land use planning in terms of sustainable development with the help of land use zoning optimization and sustainable land governance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implications for Land System Governance for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 1246 KiB  
Article
Dose Land Negotiation Policy Promote or Suppress Hidden Debts of Local Governments?
by Yinglan Zhao, Jingwen Xu, Chen Feng and Chi Gong
Land 2023, 12(5), 985; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12050985 - 28 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1023
Abstract
Using panel data from 275 prefecture-level cities in China spanning from 2003 to 2019, this paper employs the multiperiod difference-in-differences method to empirically analyze the policy effect of land negotiation policy on local governments’ hidden debt. The paper also investigates the influence mechanisms [...] Read more.
Using panel data from 275 prefecture-level cities in China spanning from 2003 to 2019, this paper employs the multiperiod difference-in-differences method to empirically analyze the policy effect of land negotiation policy on local governments’ hidden debt. The paper also investigates the influence mechanisms of land finance, budget soft constraints, fiscal decentralization and government competition. The empirical results reveal that: (1) Land negotiations promote the expansion of local governments’ hidden debt, which is counterproductive to the sustainable development of government finances. (2) The impact of land negotiation policy on local government’s hidden debt is transmitted via its effects on land finance. (3) The greater the degree of soft budget constraint and the degree of government competition, the less the expansion effect of land negotiations on the hidden debt of the government. The greater the degree of fiscal decentralization, the greater the expansion effect of land negotiations on the government’s hidden debt. (4) Land negotiation promotes the expansion of hidden debt in eastern China and inhibits it in central China, with no significant effect observed in western China. (5) Cities with larger urban scale and higher economic development levels experience stronger effects from land negotiation policies. Therefore, it is imperative to deepen the land negotiation system further, develop policy indicators and feedback mechanisms tailored to local conditions, and introduce a multiparty supervision system to enhance implementation of the land negotiation system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implications for Land System Governance for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

19 pages, 694 KiB  
Systematic Review
European Permanent Grasslands: A Systematic Review of Economic Drivers of Change, Including a Detailed Analysis of the Czech Republic, Spain, Sweden, and UK
by John Elliott, Sophie Tindale, Samantha Outhwaite, Fiona Nicholson, Paul Newell-Price, Novieta H. Sari, Erik Hunter, Pedro Sánchez-Zamora, Shan Jin, Rosa Gallardo-Cobos, Simona Miškolci and Lynn J. Frewer
Land 2024, 13(1), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13010116 - 21 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1437
Abstract
Permanent grasslands (PG) feature in the European rural landscape and represent a major agricultural production resource. They support multiple non-provisioning ecosystem services (ES), including climate regulation, flood control, biodiversity, and pollination. PG are at risk of loss or degradation due to agricultural land [...] Read more.
Permanent grasslands (PG) feature in the European rural landscape and represent a major agricultural production resource. They support multiple non-provisioning ecosystem services (ES), including climate regulation, flood control, biodiversity, and pollination. PG are at risk of loss or degradation due to agricultural land use and land management changes. The objective of this systematic review is to identify the main economic influences shaping management and maintenance of PG, and the risks and opportunities for delivery of a range of ES. A total of 51 papers were included. Relevant policy interventions and economic drivers are identified in relation to how they shape the management of EU grasslands over time and across farming systems, countries, or biogeographic zones. A high reliance on public payments from the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), with uneven impact on mitigating PG losses and associated ES provisions, was identified, which needs to be considered in relation to ongoing CAP reform. There is a gap in the literature regarding economic tipping points for change. Future research needs to identify and map ES provisions by PG along with trade-offs and synergies, and link this to policy. There are substantive challenges to maintaining Europe’s PG area and management, which must be addressed through EU-wide instruments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implications for Land System Governance for Sustainability)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop