Special Issue "Recent Progress in Forest Restoration"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jorge Mongil-Manso
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Hydrology and Conservation Research Group, Catholic University of Ávila, MO 64145 Ávila, Spain
Interests: forest restoration; forest hydrology; erosion and desertification
Prof. Dr. Joaquín Navarro Hevia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture and Forest Engineering, University of Valladolid, 47002 Valladolid, Spain
Interests: erosion control; forest and hydrological restoration; bioengineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forest ecosystems generate important ecosystem services and benefits, such as the conservation of biodiversity, the mitigation of climate change, and the regulation of hydrological processes. However, extensive forest lands have been degraded across the world. The restoration of these lands should be of high priority. Research and innovation in the topic of forest restoration are therefore urgent.

Advances in forest science and ecology have made it possible to improve restoration techniques—in particular, in terms of the choice of species to be used, nursery cultivation, conservation of forest genetic resources, and site preparation and implantation methods, among others. New forest restoration strategies (at the stand and landscape scale) must address issues such as the formation of microenvironments that are more favorable for the survival and development of seedlings, improved efficiency in the use of natural processes (nature-based solutions), the optimization of hydrological processes, and self-protection of the forests against fires.

This Special Issue seeks to bring together articles that present recent advances in these and other issues related to the restoration of forest ecosystems. We find the following topics particularly interesting:

  • Climate-adaptive forest restoration and reforestation;
  • Forest restoration and carbon sequestration;
  • Causes of restoration and reforestation failures vs. success;
  • "Lessons learned" in historic forest restorations;
  • Effects of forest restoration on biodiversity and genetic diversity;
  • Species selection in the lights of climate change;
  • Influence of forest restoration on forest–water–soil relationships;
  • Forest restoration and soil conservation;
  • Development of innovative seeding and planting techniques;
  • Forest-related ecosystem services;
  • Socio-ecological aspects in forestry.

Prof. Dr. Jorge Mongil-Manso
Prof. Dr. Joaquín Navarro Hevia
Prof. Ilan Stavi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest ecosystems
  • forest restoration
  • forest soils
  • reforestation
  • site preparation
  • tree planting
  • vegetation-water-soil relationships

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Early Response of Soil Properties under Different Restoration Strategies in Tropical Hotspot
Land 2021, 10(8), 768; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10080768 - 21 Jul 2021
Viewed by 234
Abstract
The Brazilian Atlantic Forest has undergone adverse land-use change due to deforestation for urbanization and agriculture. Numerous restoration initiatives have been taken to restore its ecosystem services. Deforested areas have been restored through active intervention or natural regeneration. Understanding the impact of those [...] Read more.
The Brazilian Atlantic Forest has undergone adverse land-use change due to deforestation for urbanization and agriculture. Numerous restoration initiatives have been taken to restore its ecosystem services. Deforested areas have been restored through active intervention or natural regeneration. Understanding the impact of those different reforestation approaches on soil quality should provide important scientific and practical conclusions on increasing forest cover in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest biome. However, studies evaluating active planting versus natural regeneration in terms of soil recovery are scarce. We evaluate soil dynamics under those two contrasting strategies at an early stage (<10 years). Reforestation was conducted simultaneously on degraded lands previously used for cattle grazing and compared to an abandoned pasture as a reference system. We examined soil physicochemical properties such as: pH, soil organic matter content, soil moisture, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu, Al, and soil texture. We also present the costs of both methods. We found significant differences in restored areas regarding pH, Na, Fe, Mn content, and the cost. Soil moisture was significantly higher in pasture. Our research can contribute to better decision-making about which restoration strategy to adopt to maximize restoration success regarding soil quality and ecosystem services in the tropics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Forest Restoration)
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