Special Issue "Land Use Planning and Territorial Impact Assessment Analysis to Bound and Regulate Land Use Depauperative Dynamics"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020) | Viewed by 3350

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Bernardino Romano
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Construction, Architecture and Environment, University of L’Aquila, Monteluco di Roio, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
Interests: urban and environmental planning; territorial analysis and diagnosis; indicators engineering
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Dr. Federico Martellozzo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics and Management (DISEI), University of Florence, Via delle Pandette, 32, 50127 Firenze, Italy
Interests: socio-ecological systems and vulnerability; sustainable and equitable development; intra-scale sustainability assessement; land use change and resource consumption; GIS and spatial analysis; political-economic and computational geography
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Federico Amato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
EPFL Swiss Data Science Center (SDSC), Lausanne, Switzerland
Interests: environmental data mining; machine learning; spatial planning
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Prof. Dr. Beniamino Murgante
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, University of Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: spatial planning; spatial simulation; geodemographics; geographic data analysis of socioeconomic and population data; planning 2.0; participation 2.0; e-democracy; e-participation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The growth in demand for natural resources, particularly by urbanites, is undoubtedly a matter that needs urgent solutions. This problem is exacerbated by a growing population projected up to 9 billion, coupled with an accelerated rural-to-urban migration. Indeed, natural resource exploitation is crucial to sustain human activities, but the consequential environmental burden exerted by anthropogenic pressure is an issue that cannot be neglected any longer. This augmented pressure affects atmosphere, water, and land systems. Concerning land use systems, the anthropogenic burden can be characterized as the environment-degrading land use dynamics that depauperate the natural base and ecosystem services, such as vegetation loss, land use fragmentation, agricultural shift, and finally frantic urban expansion and sprawl. This aspect of the human/environment interaction can be characterized as a paradox of development: on the one hand, there is an increasing demand for natural resources to support humanity, and on the other hand, there is a need to improve the Earth’s resilience by alleviating the stress on the natural environment caused by humanity’s needs. The rate at which the natural environment is being depleted has indeed gone well beyond what planet Earth’s resilience capabilities can regenerate. Therefore, addressing the mitigation of the burden of human activities on the environment is paramount for the persistence of many species (including humans) and for the protection of many ecosystems. However, as Johan Rockstrom reminds us, human development also provided us with improvements in scientific knowledge that enable the possibility of recognizing the problem, diagnosing the causes, designing a different future, and elaborating effective strategies to realize it. Specifically, there is a growing interest from administrative bodies at different scales (particularly at the EU level) for both ex-ante and ex-post impact territorial impact analysis as fundamental tools to support and implement effective planning strategies. Social and natural sciences now have the capabilities to elaborate projections and forecasts, and to coordinate participative action fostering a resilient future human/environment interaction, However, only through a constructive dialogue with policy-making is it possible to effectively shape the negotiation between human activities and climate change adaptation in order to anticipate and realize an equitable and sustainable future.

This Special Issue aims at collecting original contributions, subject to a rigorous peer review, regarding empirical and theoretical innovative works that focus on the elaboration of forecasts and projections for the future, or ex-post evidence-based analysis, on depauperative land use dynamics. The main goal is to investigate the dynamic of the human/environment interaction, learn from past examples, understand where this is leading human development, imagine an alternative future, and elaborate on what should be done to achieve sustainability goals.

Prof. Beniamino Murgante
Prof. Bernardino Romano
Dr. Federico Martellozzo
Dr. Federico Amato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • statistical learning theory
  • geostatistics and spatio-temporal analyses
  • LULCC modelling
  • multiple choice models
  • territorial impact analysis
  • spatial econometrics, ecological systems
  • societal infrastructure and participatory activism
  • tools-based informed policy making
  • advancements in governance and societies
  • participatory planning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Urbanization Run-Up in Italy: From a Qualitative Goal in the Boom Decades to the Present and Future Unsustainability
Land 2020, 9(9), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9090301 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 911
Abstract
The research presented in the paper intends to overcome an information gap on the evolution of urbanized surfaces in Italy which in the studies carried out so far have never been available. The only historical data on this form of land use date [...] Read more.
The research presented in the paper intends to overcome an information gap on the evolution of urbanized surfaces in Italy which in the studies carried out so far have never been available. The only historical data on this form of land use date back to the 1950s, and were extracted from a national cartography created by the Military Geographic Institute. The next chronological section available was then that of the noughties, already digital. However, much more frequent data were processed by the ten-year censuses by the National Institute of Statistics, but concerning buildings and not urbanized areas. By processing building census data, this study has put together some novel information on land take dynamics between the end of World War II and the year 2000, highlighting the more intensive processes that occurred at an extraordinary rate in the ‘70′s and ‘80′s, obtaining unprecedented information on the speed of transformation of the territory in these decades of economic boom. Through this method, we were able to obtain numerous geographical indications previously lacking on a national scale, highlight the yet significant vigor of this phenomenon and develop an inferential scenario. Full article
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Article
A System Dynamics Model and Analytic Network Process: An Integrated Approach to Investigate Urban Resilience
Land 2020, 9(8), 242; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9080242 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 1975
Abstract
During the last decade, the concept of urban resilience has been increasingly implemented in urban planning, with the main aim to design urban development strategies. Urban resilience is a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept. When applied to urban planning, it consists of studying cities [...] Read more.
During the last decade, the concept of urban resilience has been increasingly implemented in urban planning, with the main aim to design urban development strategies. Urban resilience is a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept. When applied to urban planning, it consists of studying cities as complex socio-economic systems. Municipalities are currently working to undertake appropriate actions to enrich the resilience of cities. Moreover, several difficulties concern the evaluation of the impacts over time of the strategies designed to enhance urban resilience. The present paper proposes an integrated approach based on the System Dynamics Model (SDM) and the Analytic Network Process (ANP). The objective of this research is to describe the method and to illustrate its application to the area called Basse di Stura, located in the city of Turin, Italy. The method is applied to evaluate the possible impacts of two different urban scenarios in terms of the change of urban resilience performance over time. The final result is represented by an index that describes urban resilience performance. Full article
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