Special Issue "Molecular Diagnosis and Novel Therapies for Neuromuscular/Musculoskeletal Diseases"

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Toshifumi Yokota

Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 8812-112 St. Edmonton, AB T6G 2H7, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: neuromuscular disease; Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy; antisense therapy; animal models; spinal muscular atrophy; limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; Miyoshi myopathy
Guest Editor
Dr. Rika Maruyama

Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta
E-Mail
Interests: musculoskeletal disease; facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD); CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing; BMP signaling; Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, “Molecular Diagnosis and Novel Therapies for Neuromuscular/Musculoskeletal Diseases”, will focus on the recent progress of molecular diagnosis and the development of novel therapies for neuromuscular and musculoskeletal diseases. We intend to invite researchers in the field to submit original research and review articles on the advancement of molecular diagnosis and novel therapies, including (but not limited to) molecular-based genetic tests, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), biomarkers, antisense oligonucleotide therapy, mutation-based therapy, gene therapy, molecular therapy, genome-editing technology, delivery enhancement, exosome-mediated delivery, stem cell transfer, and neuromuscular/musculoskeletal disease models to evaluate the efficacy of treatments. In addition, the mechanism involved in molecular diagnosis and novel therapies, such as genetic modifiers and stem cell functions, will be considered.

Prof. Toshifumi Yokota
Dr. Rika Maruyama
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Neuromuscular/musculoskeletal disease
  • Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy
  • CRISPR/Cas9
  • Antisense therapy
  • RNA therapeutics
  • Genome-editing
  • Biomarkers
  • Spinal muscular atrophy
  • New chemistry for antisense therapy and genome-targeting
  • New techniques of delivery for antisense therapy and genome-targeting

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Restoring Dystrophin Expression in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Current Status of Therapeutic Approaches
J. Pers. Med. 2019, 9(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm9010001
Received: 8 December 2018 / Revised: 30 December 2018 / Accepted: 1 January 2019 / Published: 7 January 2019
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Abstract
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, is caused by the absence or a decreased amount of the muscle cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Currently, several therapeutic approaches to cure DMD are being investigated, which can be categorized into [...] Read more.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, is caused by the absence or a decreased amount of the muscle cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Currently, several therapeutic approaches to cure DMD are being investigated, which can be categorized into two groups: therapies that aim to restore dystrophin expression, and those that aim to compensate for the lack of dystrophin. Therapies that restore dystrophin expression include read-through therapy, exon skipping, vector-mediated gene therapy, and cell therapy. Of these approaches, the most advanced are the read-through and exon skipping therapies. In 2014, ataluren, a drug that can promote ribosomal read-through of mRNA containing a premature stop codon, was conditionally approved in Europe. In 2016, eteplirsen, a morpholino-based chemical capable of skipping exon 51 in premature mRNA, received conditional approval in the USA. Clinical trials on vector-mediated gene therapy carrying micro- and mini- dystrophin are underway. More innovative therapeutic approaches include CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing and stem cell-based cell therapies. Here we review the current status of therapeutic approaches for DMD, focusing on therapeutic approaches that can restore dystrophin. Full article
Open AccessReview Personalized Medicine and Molecular Interaction Networks in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): Current Knowledge
J. Pers. Med. 2018, 8(4), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm8040044
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 27 November 2018 / Accepted: 5 December 2018 / Published: 13 December 2018
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Abstract
Multiple genes and mechanisms of pathophysiology have been implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting it is a complex systemic disease. With this in mind, applying personalized medicine (PM) approaches to tailor treatment pipelines for ALS patients may be necessary. The modelling and [...] Read more.
Multiple genes and mechanisms of pathophysiology have been implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggesting it is a complex systemic disease. With this in mind, applying personalized medicine (PM) approaches to tailor treatment pipelines for ALS patients may be necessary. The modelling and analysis of molecular interaction networks could represent valuable resources in defining ALS-associated pathways and discovering novel therapeutic targets. Here we review existing omics datasets and analytical approaches, in order to consider how molecular interaction networks could improve our understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of this fatal neuromuscular disorder. Full article
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Open AccessReview Multiple Exon Skipping in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Hot Spots: Prospects and Challenges
J. Pers. Med. 2018, 8(4), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm8040041
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 24 November 2018 / Accepted: 4 December 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
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Abstract
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal X-linked recessive disorder, is caused mostly by frame-disrupting, out-of-frame deletions in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapy for DMD. Exon skipping aims to convert out-of-frame mRNA to in-frame mRNA [...] Read more.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal X-linked recessive disorder, is caused mostly by frame-disrupting, out-of-frame deletions in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapy for DMD. Exon skipping aims to convert out-of-frame mRNA to in-frame mRNA and induce the production of internally-deleted dystrophin as seen in the less severe Becker muscular dystrophy. Currently, multiple exon skipping has gained special interest as a new therapeutic modality for this approach. Previous retrospective database studies represented a potential therapeutic application of multiple exon skipping. Since then, public DMD databases have become more useful with an increase in patient registration and advances in molecular diagnosis. Here, we provide an update on DMD genotype-phenotype associations using a global DMD database and further provide the rationale for multiple exon skipping development, particularly for exons 45–55 skipping and an emerging therapeutic concept, exons 3–9 skipping. Importantly, this review highlights the potential of multiple exon skipping for enabling the production of functionally-corrected dystrophin and for treating symptomatic patients not only with out-of-frame deletions but also those with in-frame deletions. We will also discuss prospects and challenges in multiple exon skipping therapy, referring to recent progress in antisense chemistry and design, as well as disease models. Full article
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Open AccessReview Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 for the Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
J. Pers. Med. 2018, 8(4), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm8040038
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 20 November 2018 / Accepted: 20 November 2018 / Published: 24 November 2018
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Abstract
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked recessive neuromuscular disease prevalent in 1 in 3500 to 5000 males worldwide. As a result of mutations that interrupt the reading frame of the dystrophin gene (DMD), DMD is characterized by a loss [...] Read more.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked recessive neuromuscular disease prevalent in 1 in 3500 to 5000 males worldwide. As a result of mutations that interrupt the reading frame of the dystrophin gene (DMD), DMD is characterized by a loss of dystrophin protein that leads to decreased muscle membrane integrity, which increases susceptibility to degeneration. CRISPR/Cas9 technology has garnered interest as an avenue for DMD therapy due to its potential for permanent exon skipping, which can restore the disrupted DMD reading frame in DMD and lead to dystrophin restoration. An RNA-guided DNA endonuclease system, CRISPR/Cas9 allows for the targeted editing of specific sequences in the genome. The efficacy and safety of CRISPR/Cas9 as a therapy for DMD has been evaluated by numerous studies in vitro and in vivo, with varying rates of success. Despite the potential of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing for the long-term treatment of DMD, its translation into the clinic is currently challenged by issues such as off-targeting, immune response activation, and sub-optimal in vivo delivery. Its nature as being mostly a personalized form of therapy also limits applicability to DMD patients, who exhibit a wide spectrum of mutations. This review summarizes the various CRISPR/Cas9 strategies that have been tested in vitro and in vivo for the treatment of DMD. Perspectives on the approach will be provided, and the challenges faced by CRISPR/Cas9 in its road to the clinic will be briefly discussed. Full article
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J. Pers. Med. EISSN 2075-4426 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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