Special Issue "New Advances in Clinical and Translational Breast Cancer Research"

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Medicine, Cell, and Organism Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2022 | Viewed by 493

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carlos Martínez-Pérez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Genetics and Cancer, Western General Hospital, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK
Interests: breast cancer; biomarker research; translational research; endocrine therapy resistance
Dr. Arran K. Turnbull
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Genetics and Cancer, Western General Hospital, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK
Interests: breast cancer; biomarker research; translational research; endocrine therapy resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite significant improvements in breast cancer management and prognosis in recent decades, it remains the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. The many remaining challenges include the need for better patient stratification and the development of resistance to different treatment modalities; a better understanding of the heterogenous biology of the disease and the complex mechanisms enabling cancer relapse and progression will be essential to continue improving breast cancer outcomes, especially in the metastatic setting.

In addition to clinical studies, translational research—which utilises clinical samples and data for discovery and validation studies, and/or seeks to answer specific clinical questions—will be essential in addressing these needs and, crucially, bringing novel findings or emerging treatments closer to the clinic.

In this Special Issue, we will collect original research articles and reviews that report on or summarise the latest findings in clinical and translational breast cancer research. Such studies can lead to the identification or validation of novel biomarkers or potential therapeutic targets, the characterisation of the effects of emerging therapeutics or the development of predictive tools with clinical potential. Additionally, the study of clinical specimens can help shed light on the complexity of the disease, both identifying disease mechanisms or corroborating findings based on pre-clinical cancer models. 

Dr. Carlos Martínez-Pérez
Dr. Arran K. Turnbull
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • clinical research
  • translational research
  • emerging therapies
  • novel drugs
  • personalized medicine
  • biomarker research
  • biomarker discovery

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
No Ink on Tumor” in Breast-Conserving Surgery after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy
J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12(7), 1031; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12071031 - 23 Jun 2022
Viewed by 234
Abstract
Background/Aim: Patients with Stage I-II breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (BCS-NAC) were retrospectively assessed in order to evaluate the extent of a safe excision margin. Materials and Methods: Between 2003 and 2020, 151 patients underwent risk-adapted BCS-NAC; margin involvement was [...] Read more.
Background/Aim: Patients with Stage I-II breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (BCS-NAC) were retrospectively assessed in order to evaluate the extent of a safe excision margin. Materials and Methods: Between 2003 and 2020, 151 patients underwent risk-adapted BCS-NAC; margin involvement was always assessed at definitive histology. Patients with complete pathological response (pCR) were classified as the RX group, whereas those with residual disease and negative margins were stratified as R0 < 1 mm (margin < 1 mm) and R0 > 1 mm (margin > 1 mm). Results: Totals of 29 (19.2%), 64 (42.4%), and 58 patients (38.4%) were included in the R0 < 1 mm, R0 > 1 mm, and RX groups, respectively, and 2 patients with margin involvement had a mastectomy. Ten instances of local recurrence (6.6%) occurred, with no statistically significant difference in local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) between the three groups. A statistically significant advantage of disease-free survival (p = 0.002) and overall survival (p = 0.010) was observed in patients with pCR. Conclusions: BCS-NAC was increased, especially in HER-2-positive and triple-negative tumors; risk-adapted BCS should be preferably pursued to highlight the cosmetic benefit of NAC. The similar rate of LRFS in the three groups of patients suggests a shift toward the “no ink on tumor” paradigm for patients undergoing BCS-NAC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Clinical and Translational Breast Cancer Research)
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