Clinical Updates on Reproductive Medicine

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Medicine, Cell, and Organism Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2024 | Viewed by 621

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Biomedical and Human Oncological Science, University of Bari, 70100 Bari, Italy
Interests: obstetrics; gynecology; reproductive medicine; assisted reproductive technology; fertility preservation; laparoscopy; hysteroscopy

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Guest Editor
Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Biomedical and Human Oncological Science, University of Bari, 70100 Bari, Italy
Interests: reproductive medicine; assisted reproductive technology; infertility; embryology; immunology; reproductive surgery; artificial intelligence; fertility preservation; fertility counseling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Reproductive medicine is at the forefront of healthcare around the world and has the difficult task of addressing challenges of human fertility, reproductive health, and family planning. Some techniques (considered experimental in the past) now represent the standard of treatment, while others, such as immunology, molecular biology, and artificial intelligence, represent the last frontier. The aim of this Special Issue is to explore the latest research and clinical practices in this field, thanks to the knowledge of colleagues from around the world who will share their findings with editors and readers.

This Special Issue welcomes original studies and reviews with an innovative focus on all aspects of reproductive medicine, including gynecological and andrological fields (emerging reproductive health issues, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment), assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), spontaneous reproduction, and fertility preservation techniques.

Dr. Antonio Damato
Dr. Amerigo Vitagliano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • reproductive medicine
  • assisted reproductive technology
  • infertility
  • embryology
  • immunology
  • reproductive surgery
  • artificial intelligence
  • reproductive surgery
  • fertility preservation
  • fertility counseling

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

19 pages, 306 KiB  
Review
Shoulder Dystocia: A Comprehensive Literature Review on Diagnosis, Prevention, Complications, Prognosis, and Management
by Panagiotis Tsikouras, Sonia Kotanidou, Konstantinos Nikolettos, Nektaria Kritsotaki, Anastasia Bothou, Sotiris Andreou, Theopi Nalmpanti, Kyriaki Chalkia, Vlassios Spanakis, Panagiotis Peitsidis, George Iatrakis and Nikolaos Nikolettos
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(6), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14060586 - 30 May 2024
Viewed by 424
Abstract
The term dystocia refers to labor characterized by a slow progression with delayed rates or even pauses in the dilation of the cervix or the descent of the fetus. Dystocia describes the deviation from the limits that define a normal birth and is [...] Read more.
The term dystocia refers to labor characterized by a slow progression with delayed rates or even pauses in the dilation of the cervix or the descent of the fetus. Dystocia describes the deviation from the limits that define a normal birth and is often used as a synonym for the term pathological birth. Shoulder dystocia, also known as the manual exit of the shoulders during vaginal delivery on cephalic presentation, is defined as the “failure of the shoulders to spontaneously traverse the pelvis after delivery of the fetal head”. This means that obstetric interventions are necessary to deliver the fetus’s body after the head has been delivered, as gentle traction has failed. Abnormal labor (dystocia) is expressed and represented in partograms or by the prolongation of the latent phase or by slowing and pausing in the phases of cervical dilatation and fetal descent. While partograms are helpful in visualizing the progress of labor, regular use of them has not been shown to enhance obstetric outcomes considerably, and no partogram has been shown to be superior to others in comparative trials. Dystocia can, therefore, appear in any phase of the evolution of childbirth, so it is necessary to simultaneously assess all the factors that may contribute to its abnormal evolution, that is, the forces exerted, the weight, the shape, the presentation and position of the fetus, the integrity and morphology of the pelvis, and its relation to the fetus. When this complication occurs, it can result in an increased incidence of maternal morbidity, as well as an increased incidence of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although several risk factors are associated with shoulder dystocia, it has proven impossible to recognize individual cases of shoulder dystocia in practice before they occur during labor. Various guidelines have been published for the management of shoulder dystocia, with the primary goal of educating the obstetrician and midwife on the importance of a preplanned sequence of maneuvers, thereby reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Updates on Reproductive Medicine)
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