Special Issue "Yeast Biorefineries"

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Isabel Sa-Correia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa and Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: Yeast molecular biology and multiomics; Yeast Physiology; Yeast diversity; Valorization of bioresidues; Development of superior yeasts
Dr. Naseem A. Gaur
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB), New Delhi, India
Interests: Synthetic biology; Bioenergy; Biofuels; Yeast metabolic engineering; C5/C6 fermentation

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Advanced biorefineries have the aim of valorizing biomass and bioresidues from forestry, agriculture, and agrifood industries, among others, into a wide spectrum of biofuels and other bioproducts. They are key to implementing a sustainable bio-based economy, but research and development are still required to obtain environmentally friendly and economically feasible commercial-scale biorefineries. For this reason, this is a very active and exciting area of R&D.

This Special Issue intends to gather the most recent and original research and review papers on the identification, development, and exploitation of robust, metabolically promising, and genetically engineered yeast strains for advanced biorefineries. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major cell factory for which vast biological knowledge and genetic tools are available. However, the exploitation of non-Saccharomyces yeasts is recently gaining momentum, making this large and heterogeneous group desirable for the synthesis of a wide range of added-value products, in particular lipids/oleofuels, bioethanol, carotenoids, organic acids, and biopolymers.

Papers on the identification, exploitation, and development of robust, metabolically promising, and genetically engineered conventional and non-conventional yeast strains for biorefineries are welcome. Papers exploring functional and comparative genomics analyses for understanding the physiological genomics of yeasts as cell factories and the development of bioprocesses, especially those dedicated to the valorization of bioresidues and the production of added-value products by yeasts, are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Isabel Sa-Correia
Dr. Naseem A. Gaur
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • valorization of bio-residues
  • biofuels
  • value added bioproducts
  • yeast biodiversity
  • yeast molecular biology and multiomics
  • yeast physiology
  • bioprocess engineering
  • metabolic engineering
  • synthetic biology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Complete Utilization of the Major Carbon Sources Present in Sugar Beet Pulp Hydrolysates by the Oleaginous Red Yeasts Rhodotorula toruloides and R. mucilaginosa
J. Fungi 2021, 7(3), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7030215 - 17 Mar 2021
Viewed by 299
Abstract
Agro-industrial residues are low-cost carbon sources (C-sources) for microbial growth and production of value-added bioproducts. Among the agro-industrial residues available, those rich in pectin are generated in high amounts worldwide from the sugar industry or the industrial processing of fruits and vegetables. Sugar [...] Read more.
Agro-industrial residues are low-cost carbon sources (C-sources) for microbial growth and production of value-added bioproducts. Among the agro-industrial residues available, those rich in pectin are generated in high amounts worldwide from the sugar industry or the industrial processing of fruits and vegetables. Sugar beet pulp (SBP) hydrolysates contain predominantly the neutral sugars d-glucose, l-arabinose and d-galactose, and the acidic sugar d-galacturonic acid. Acetic acid is also present at significant concentrations since the d-galacturonic acid residues are acetylated. In this study, we have examined and optimized the performance of a Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain, isolated from SBP and identified at the molecular level during this work. This study was extended to another oleaginous red yeast species, R. toruloides, envisaging the full utilization of the C-sources from SBP hydrolysate (at pH 5.0). The dual role of acetic acid as a carbon and energy source and as a growth and metabolism inhibitor was examined. Acetic acid prevented the catabolism of d-galacturonic acid and l-arabinose after the complete use of the other C-sources. However, d-glucose and acetic acid were simultaneously and efficiently metabolized, followed by d-galactose. SBP hydrolysate supplementation with amino acids was crucial to allow d-galacturonic acid and l-arabinose catabolism. SBP valorization through the production of lipids and carotenoids by Rhodotorula strains, supported by complete catabolism of the major C-sources present, looks promising for industrial implementation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeast Biorefineries)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Ethanol Production from Wheat Straw Hydrolysate by Issatchenkia Orientalis Isolated from Waste Cooking Oil
J. Fungi 2021, 7(2), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7020121 - 06 Feb 2021
Viewed by 534
Abstract
The interest in using non-conventional yeasts to produce value-added compounds from low cost substrates, such as lignocellulosic materials, has increased in recent years. Setting out to discover novel microbial strains that can be used in biorefineries, an Issatchenkia orientalis strain was isolated from [...] Read more.
The interest in using non-conventional yeasts to produce value-added compounds from low cost substrates, such as lignocellulosic materials, has increased in recent years. Setting out to discover novel microbial strains that can be used in biorefineries, an Issatchenkia orientalis strain was isolated from waste cooking oil (WCO) and its capability to produce ethanol from wheat straw hydrolysate (WSHL) was analyzed. As with previously isolated I. orientalis strains, WCO-isolated I. orientalis KJ27-7 is thermotolerant. It grows well at elevated temperatures up to 42 °C. Furthermore, spot drop tests showed that it is tolerant to various chemical fermentation inhibitors that are derived from the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials. I. orientalis KJ27-7 is particularly tolerant to acetic acid (up to 75 mM) and tolerates 10 mM formic acid, 5 mM furfural and 10 mM hydroxymethylfurfural. Important for biotechnological cellulosic ethanol production, I. orientalis KJ27-7 grows well on plates containing up to 10% ethanol and media containing up to 90% WSHL. As observed in shake flask fermentations, the specific ethanol productivity correlates with WSHL concentrations. In 90% WSHL media, I. orientalis KJ27-7 produced 10.3 g L−1 ethanol within 24 h. This corresponds to a product yield of 0.50 g g−1 glucose (97% of the theoretical maximum) and a volumetric productivity of 0.43 g L−1 h−1. Therefore, I. orientalis KJ27-7 is an efficient producer of lignocellulosic ethanol from WSHL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeast Biorefineries)
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Open AccessArticle
The Identification of Genetic Determinants of Methanol Tolerance in Yeast Suggests Differences in Methanol and Ethanol Toxicity Mechanisms and Candidates for Improved Methanol Tolerance Engineering
J. Fungi 2021, 7(2), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7020090 - 27 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 549
Abstract
Methanol is a promising feedstock for metabolically competent yeast strains-based biorefineries. However, methanol toxicity can limit the productivity of these bioprocesses. Therefore, the identification of genes whose expression is required for maximum methanol tolerance is important for mechanistic insights and rational genomic manipulation [...] Read more.
Methanol is a promising feedstock for metabolically competent yeast strains-based biorefineries. However, methanol toxicity can limit the productivity of these bioprocesses. Therefore, the identification of genes whose expression is required for maximum methanol tolerance is important for mechanistic insights and rational genomic manipulation to obtain more robust methylotrophic yeast strains. The present chemogenomic analysis was performed with this objective based on the screening of the Euroscarf Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid deletion mutant collection to search for susceptibility phenotypes in YPD medium supplemented with 8% (v/v) methanol, at 35 °C, compared with an equivalent ethanol concentration (5.5% (v/v)). Around 400 methanol tolerance determinants were identified, 81 showing a marked phenotype. The clustering of the identified tolerance genes indicates an enrichment of functional categories in the methanol dataset not enriched in the ethanol dataset, such as chromatin remodeling, DNA repair and fatty acid biosynthesis. Several genes involved in DNA repair (eight RAD genes), identified as specific for methanol toxicity, were previously reported as tolerance determinants for formaldehyde, a methanol detoxification pathway intermediate. This study provides new valuable information on genes and potential regulatory networks involved in overcoming methanol toxicity. This knowledge is an important starting point for the improvement of methanol tolerance in yeasts capable of catabolizing and copying with methanol concentrations present in promising bioeconomy feedstocks, including industrial residues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeast Biorefineries)
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