Special Issue "Advances in Wave Energy Harvesting"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 February 2021) | Viewed by 14165

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giuliana Mattiazzo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy
Interests: marine energy; wave energy converter; WEC control; mooring system; nonlinear hydrodynamics; nonlinear modeling
Dr. Giovanni Bracco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Turin, Italy
Interests: marine energy; wave energy converter; offshore wind; renewable energy; system dynamics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to announce this Special Issue on “Advances in Wave Energy Harvesting”!

We look forward to receiving your contribution on the state of the art and perspectives on the Wave Energy fields and all the related topics, such as modeling, experiments, hydrodynamics, control, moorings, array deployment, PTO, advanced materials, and economics.

The aim of the Session is to give insight into what is going on in the field; therefore, the Session is open to review papers on Wave Energy technology, markets, mathematical modeling, free software, and tools.

Novel wave energy conversion concepts, experimental setups, and hardware-in-the-loop techniques are very welcome.

Prof. Giuliana Mattiazzo
Dr. Giovanni Bracco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wave power
  • Ocean engineering
  • Wave energy conversion
  • Nonlinear hydrodynamics
  • Power takeoff
  • Moorings
  • Market perspectives

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Experimental Validation and Comparison of Numerical Models for the Mooring System of a Floating Wave Energy Converter
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(8), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8080565 - 27 Jul 2020
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 2619
Abstract
The mooring system of floating wave energy converters (WECs) has a crucial impact on power generation efficiency, cost of delivered energy, proper operation, reliability and survivability. An effective design, addressing such competing objectives, requires appropriate mathematical models to predict mooring loads and dynamic [...] Read more.
The mooring system of floating wave energy converters (WECs) has a crucial impact on power generation efficiency, cost of delivered energy, proper operation, reliability and survivability. An effective design, addressing such competing objectives, requires appropriate mathematical models to predict mooring loads and dynamic response. However, conversely to traditional offshore engineering applications, experience in modelling mooring systems for WECs is limited, due to their unique requirement of maximising the motion while minimising loads and costs. Even though modelling approaches and software are available for this application, guidelines and critical comparison are still scarce. This paper proposes a discussion and validation of three mooring-line models: one quasi-static approach (developed in-house) and two dynamic lumped-mass approaches (the open source MoorDyn and the commercial OrcaFlex). The case study is a 1:32-scale prototype of a floating oscillating water column WEC tested in a wave tank, with three mooring lines, each one comprising of a riser and a clump weight. Validation, performed by imposing fairlead displacements and comparing resulting tensions, shows good agreement. The small scale may induce numerical instabilities and uncertainties in the parameter estimation. Finally, likely due to internal resonance of this particular mooring system, high-frequency content in the mooring tension is found, albeit absent in the kinematics of the floater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wave Energy Harvesting)
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Article
Analysis and Selection of Deployment Methods for a Wave Glider System
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(7), 529; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8070529 - 17 Jul 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1349
Abstract
A wave glider is a novel unmanned marine vehicle which can convert marine energy into kinetic energy. In practice, it is crucial for the wave glider system to deploy into the ocean environment efficiently and safely. Hence, the present work establishes the wave [...] Read more.
A wave glider is a novel unmanned marine vehicle which can convert marine energy into kinetic energy. In practice, it is crucial for the wave glider system to deploy into the ocean environment efficiently and safely. Hence, the present work establishes the wave glider motion equations to analyze the deployment method. Firstly, the wave glider model is simplified in the vertical plane and the cable model is defined as mass nodes connected with a massless spring. Then, two typical deployment methods (Method 1 and Method 2) are proposed based on the multibody dynamic method, and the numerical simulation model is established to investigate the kinematic performance of two deployment methods. Lastly, the dynamic characteristic analysis is conducted to select the determined deployment method. We explain the practical advantages of Method 1, which would provide the reference for the deployment method selection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wave Energy Harvesting)
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Article
Power Take-Off and Energy Storage System Static Modeling and Sizing for Direct Drive Wave Energy Converter to Support Ocean Sensing Applications
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(7), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8070513 - 13 Jul 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1810
Abstract
This paper addresses the sizing and design problem of a permanent magnet electrical machine power take-off system for a two-body wave energy converter, which is designed to support ocean sensing applications with sustained power. The design is based upon ground truth ocean data [...] Read more.
This paper addresses the sizing and design problem of a permanent magnet electrical machine power take-off system for a two-body wave energy converter, which is designed to support ocean sensing applications with sustained power. The design is based upon ground truth ocean data bi-spectrums (swell and wind waves) from Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory in the year 2015. According to the ground truth ocean data, the paper presents the optimal harvesting power time series of the whole year. The electrical machine and energy storage static modeling are introduced in the paper. The paper uses the ground truth ocean data in March to discuss the model integration of the buoy dynamic model, the power take-off model, and the energy storage model. Electrical machine operation constraints are applied to ensure the designed machine can fulfill the buoy control requirements. The electrical machine and energy storage systems operation status is presented as well. Furthermore, rule-based control strategies are applied to the electrical machine for fulfilling specific design demands, such as improving power generating efficiency and downsizing the electrical machine scale. The corresponding required capacities of the energy storage system are discussed. This paper relates results to the wave data sets (different combinations of significant wave heights and periods of both swell and wind waves). In this way, the power take-off system rule-based control strategy determinations can rely on current ocean wave measurements instead of a large historical ocean wave database. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wave Energy Harvesting)
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Article
Experimental Investigation of the Mooring System of a Wave Energy Converter in Operating and Extreme Wave Conditions
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(3), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8030180 - 07 Mar 2020
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 3476
Abstract
A proper design of the mooring systems for Wave Energy Converters (WECs) requires an accurate investigation of both operating and extreme wave conditions. A careful analysis of these systems is required to design a mooring configuration that ensures station keeping, reliability, maintainability, and [...] Read more.
A proper design of the mooring systems for Wave Energy Converters (WECs) requires an accurate investigation of both operating and extreme wave conditions. A careful analysis of these systems is required to design a mooring configuration that ensures station keeping, reliability, maintainability, and low costs, without affecting the WEC dynamics. In this context, an experimental campaign on a 1:20 scaled prototype of the ISWEC (Inertial Sea Wave Energy Converter), focusing on the influence of the mooring layout on loads in extreme wave conditions, is presented and discussed. Two mooring configurations composed of multiple slack catenaries with sub-surface buoys, with or without clump-weights, have been designed and investigated experimentally. Tests in regular, irregular, and extreme waves for a moored model of the ISWEC device have been performed at the University of Naples Federico II. The aim is to identify a mooring solution that could guarantee both correct operation of the device and load carrying in extreme sea conditions. Pitch motion and loads in the rotational joint have been considered as indicators of the device hydrodynamic behavior and mooring configuration impact on the WEC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wave Energy Harvesting)
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Review

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Review
Scour Protections for Offshore Foundations of Marine Energy Harvesting Technologies: A Review
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(3), 297; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9030297 - 08 Mar 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3821
Abstract
The offshore wind is the sector of marine renewable energy with the highest commercial development at present. The margin to optimise offshore wind foundations is considerable, thus attracting both the scientific and the industrial community. Due to the complexity of the marine environment, [...] Read more.
The offshore wind is the sector of marine renewable energy with the highest commercial development at present. The margin to optimise offshore wind foundations is considerable, thus attracting both the scientific and the industrial community. Due to the complexity of the marine environment, the foundation of an offshore wind turbine represents a considerable portion of the overall investment. An important part of the foundation’s costs relates to the scour protections, which prevent scour effects that can lead the structure to reach the ultimate and service limit states. Presently, the advances in scour protections design and its optimisation for marine environments face many challenges, and the latest findings are often bounded by stakeholder’s strict confidential policies. Therefore, this paper provides a broad overview of the latest improvements acquired on this topic, which would otherwise be difficult to obtain by the scientific and general professional community. In addition, this paper summarises the key challenges and recent advances related to offshore wind turbine scour protections. Knowledge gaps, recent findings and prospective research goals are critically analysed, including the study of potential synergies with other marine renewable energy technologies, as wave and tidal energy. This research shows that scour protections are a field of study quite challenging and still with numerous questions to be answered. Thus, optimisation of scour protections in the marine environment represents a meaningful opportunity to further increase the competitiveness of marine renewable energies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wave Energy Harvesting)
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