Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Additive Manufacturing

A special issue of Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing (ISSN 2504-4494).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 10799

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce that the Special Issue “Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Additive Manufacturing” is now compiling a collection of feature papers invited by our Editorial Board Members in this research field. We welcome contributions from all of the EBMs and their invitees.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish a broad-based set of papers that represent the most influential original research articles or reviews where our EBMs discuss key themes in the field of additive manufacturing. Boosted by the successes during the pandemic, additive manufacturing has emerged as a set of practical and economically relevant manufacturing technologies. Here, we use the term additive manufacturing for any of the many possible technologies and the numerous application and market areas.  We expect these papers to be both widely read and highly influential with regard to future developments. All the papers in this Special Issue will be collected into a printed edition book after the deadline and will be actively promoted.

We look forward to working together to further develop this exciting field of research. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Additive manufacturing technologies:
    • Big area additive manufacturing;
    • New technologies for additive manufacturing;
    • Real-time correction of manufacturing during the process using dynamic feedback;
    • Automated and optimized workflows for additive manufacturing;
    • Enhanced additive manufacturing rates;
    • Metal additive manufacturing;
    • Selective laser melting additive manufacturing of plastics;
    • Automated evaluation of additively manufactured parts including properties;
    • 4D additive manufacturing;
    • Battery additive manufacturing;
    • New concepts for additive manufacturing;
    • Manufacturing function as well as form during additive manufacturing;
    • Manufacturing functional parts by additive manufacturing;
    • Additive manufacturing in flexible and reconfigurable factories;
    • Additive manufacturing in space;
    • Metrology for additive manufacturing;
    • Additive manufacturing for non-Cartesian coordinate systems;
  • Materials for additive manufacturing:
    • New materials for additive manufacturing;
    • Sustainable and renewable materials for additive manufacturing;
    • Multimaterial additive manufacturing;
  • Design for additive manufacturing:
    • New design processes and software for additive manufacturing;
    • Design by function for additive manufacturing;
    • Design and optimization of materials for additive manufacturing;
  • Modeling and simulation for additive manufacturing;
    • Multiscale simulation of additive manufacturing;
    • Digital twin technology for additive manufacturing;
  • Applications and markets:
    • New markets for additive manufacturing;
    • New economic models for additive manufacturing;
    • New medical applications through additive manufacturing;
    • New aerospace applications through additive manufacturing;
    • Additive manufacturing and security products;
    • Additive manufacturing as an education tool;
    • Additive manufacturing for dentistry;
    • Additive manufacturing for food products;
    • Additive manufacturing for devices to assist the elderly and other with limited movements.

Prof. Dr. Geoffrey R. Mitchell
Prof. Dr. Mohamed Elbestawi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 8084 KiB  
Article
Recoater-Induced Distortions and Build Failures in Selective Laser Melting of Thin-Walled Ti6Al4V Parts
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2023, 7(2), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp7020064 - 13 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2141
Abstract
Additively manufactured thin-walled structures through selective laser melting (SLM) are of great interest in achieving carbon-neutral industrial manufacturing. However, residual stresses and warpages as well as recoater crashes often occur in SLM, leading to the build failure of parts, especially for large-scale and [...] Read more.
Additively manufactured thin-walled structures through selective laser melting (SLM) are of great interest in achieving carbon-neutral industrial manufacturing. However, residual stresses and warpages as well as recoater crashes often occur in SLM, leading to the build failure of parts, especially for large-scale and lightweight geometries. The challenge in this work consists of investigating how the recoater affects the warpage and (sometimes) causes the failure of different thin-walled Ti6Al4V parts (wall thickness of 1.0 mm). All these parts are printed on the same platform using a commercial SLM machine. After the loose powder removal and before the cutting operation, a 3D-scanner is used to obtain the actual warpage of each component. Next, an in-house coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model suitable for the numerical simulation of the SLM process is enhanced to consider the recoater effects. This numerical framework is calibrated to predict the thin-walled warpage as measured by the 3D-scanner. The combination of numerical predictions with experimental observations facilitates a comprehensive understanding of the mechanical behavior of different thin-walled components as well as the failure mechanism due to the recoater. The findings show that the use of a higher laser energy input causes larger residual stresses and warpage responsible for the recoater crashes. Finally, potential solutions to mitigate the warpage and the recoater crashes in the SLM of lightweight structures are assessed using the validated model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Additive Manufacturing)
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Review

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43 pages, 29178 KiB  
Review
Ultrafast Laser Additive Manufacturing: A Review
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2023, 7(3), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp7030089 - 05 May 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3622
Abstract
Ultrafast lasers are proven and continually evolving manufacturing tools. Concurrently, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a key area of interest for 3D fabrication of objects with arbitrary geometries. Use of ultrafast lasers for AM presents possibilities for next generation manufacturing techniques for [...] Read more.
Ultrafast lasers are proven and continually evolving manufacturing tools. Concurrently, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a key area of interest for 3D fabrication of objects with arbitrary geometries. Use of ultrafast lasers for AM presents possibilities for next generation manufacturing techniques for hard-to-process materials, transparent materials, and micro- and nano-manufacturing. Of particular interest are selective laser melting/sintering (SLM/SLS), multiphoton lithography (MPL), laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), pulsed laser deposition (PLD), and welding. The development, applications, and recent advancements of these technologies are described in this review as an overview and delineation of the burgeoning ultrafast laser AM field. As they mature, their adoption by industry and incorporation into commercial systems will be facilitated by process advancements such as: process monitoring and control, increased throughput, and their integration into hybrid manufacturing systems. Recent progress regarding these aspects is also reviewed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Additive Manufacturing)
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24 pages, 2140 KiB  
Review
A Review on Wire-Fed Directed Energy Deposition Based Metal Additive Manufacturing
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2023, 7(1), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp7010045 - 08 Feb 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4515
Abstract
Metal additive manufacturing has reached a level where products and components can be directly fabricated for applications requiring small batches and customized designs, from tinny body implants to long pedestrian bridges over rivers. Wire-fed directed energy deposition based additive manufacturing enables fabricating large [...] Read more.
Metal additive manufacturing has reached a level where products and components can be directly fabricated for applications requiring small batches and customized designs, from tinny body implants to long pedestrian bridges over rivers. Wire-fed directed energy deposition based additive manufacturing enables fabricating large parts in a cost-effective way. However, achieving reliable mechanical properties, desired structural integrity, and homogeneity in microstructure and grain size is challenging due to layerwise-built characteristics. Manufacturing processes, alloy composition, process variables, and post-processing of the fabricated part strongly affect the resultant microstructure and, as a consequence, component serviceability. This paper reviews the advances in wire-fed directed energy deposition, specifically wire arc metal additive processes, and the recent efforts in grain tailoring during the process for the desired size and shape. The paper also addresses modeling methods that can improve the qualification of fabricated parts by modifying the microstructure and avoid repetitive trials and material waste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Additive Manufacturing)
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