Special Issue "Recent Development in Metal Additive Manufacturing"

A special issue of Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing (ISSN 2504-4494).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mohamed A. Elbestawi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7, Canada
Interests: metal additive manufacturing; machining science and technology; machine tools
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of JMMP is dedicated to recent research results in additive manufacturing. Contributions focused on metal additive manufacturing on any of the following topics are of particular interest:

  • Development of tailored materials for additive manufacturing
  • Process monitoring and control
  • Process modeling
  • Innovative processes and applications.

Prof. Dr. Mohamed Elbestawi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Finite Element Modeling and Mechanical Testing of Metal Composites Made by Composite Metal Foil Manufacturing
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(3), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3030081 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
Foils of aluminum 1050 H14 ½ hard temper and 99.9% copper with 500-micron thickness have been used to manufacture similar and dissimilar composites by composite metal foil manufacturing (CMFM). The metal foils are bonded to each other using a special 80% zinc and [...] Read more.
Foils of aluminum 1050 H14 ½ hard temper and 99.9% copper with 500-micron thickness have been used to manufacture similar and dissimilar composites by composite metal foil manufacturing (CMFM). The metal foils are bonded to each other using a special 80% zinc and 20% aluminum by weight brazing paste. A 3D finite element model has been developed to numerically analyze the time required to heat the metal foils so that a strong bond can be developed by the paste. The numerical simulations run in ANSYS 19.1 have been validated through experiments and rectangular layered composite products have been developed for flexural testing. The flexural test results for layered Al and Al/Cu composites are compared with solid samples of Al 1050 and 99.9% pure copper made by subtractive method. The results show that the layered Al composite is 5.2% stronger whereas the Al/Cu sample is 11.5% stronger in resisting bending loads compared to a solid Al 1050 sample. A higher bend load indicates the presence of a strong intermetallic bond created by the brazing paste between the metal foils. Corrosion testing was also carried out on the composite samples to assess the effect of corrosion on flexural strength. The tests revealed that the composites made by CMFM are not affected by galvanic corrosion after 7 days of testing and the flexural loads remained consistent with composites that were not immersed in a solution of distilled water and NaCl. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Development in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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Open AccessArticle
Metal Additive Manufacturing Cycle in Aerospace Industry: A Comprehensive Review
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3030052 - 26 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Additive Manufacturing (AM) is the forefront of advanced manufacturing technologies and has the potential to revolutionize manufacturing, with a dramatic change in the design and project paradigms. A comprehensive review of existent metal AM processes, processable materials, respective defects and inspection methods (destructive [...] Read more.
Additive Manufacturing (AM) is the forefront of advanced manufacturing technologies and has the potential to revolutionize manufacturing, with a dramatic change in the design and project paradigms. A comprehensive review of existent metal AM processes, processable materials, respective defects and inspection methods (destructive and non-destructive) is presented in a succinct manner. Particularly, the AM design optimization methodologies are reviewed and their threats and constraints discussed. Finally, an aerospace industry case study is presented and several cost-effective examples are enumerated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Development in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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Open AccessArticle
Scale, Material Concentration, Stress Relief and Part Removal Effects on the Dimensional Behaviour of Selected AlSi10Mg Components Manufactured by Laser Powder Bed Fusion
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3020049 - 18 Jun 2019
Abstract
Laser Powder Bed Fusion (LPBF) is a predominant Additive Manufacturing (AM) process. While metallic LPBF is gaining popularity, one of the barriers facing its wider industrial use is the current relatively limited knowledge with respect to its dimensional and geometrical performance, as well [...] Read more.
Laser Powder Bed Fusion (LPBF) is a predominant Additive Manufacturing (AM) process. While metallic LPBF is gaining popularity, one of the barriers facing its wider industrial use is the current relatively limited knowledge with respect to its dimensional and geometrical performance, as well as the inability to predict it. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the geometrical and dimensional deviations of selected LPBF-manufactured components according to the ASME Y14.5 (2009) standard. In this study, two types of axisymmetric parts (cylinder and cylindrical pyramid) were designed with three different levels of material concentration, and replicated at three different scales for a total of 18 test artifacts. These parts were manufactured from AlSi10Mg powder using an EOSINT M280 printer, subjected to stress relief annealing at 300 °C for two hours, removed from the platform and finished by micro shot peening. A complete statistical analysis was carried out on the artifacts before and after each post-processing step. The results of this investigation allowed for the quantification of the intra- (same part) and inter- (different parts) scale effects, as well as of the material concentration, stress relief, part removal and micro shot peening effects on the overall three-dimensional (3D) profile deviations and on the dimensional deviations of some selected features (e.g., diameter, thickness). For example, cylindrical pyramid parts showed the following average deviations of their outside diameters: a −63 µm shrinkage of the as-built part diameter as compared to its computer-assisted design (CAD) value, a +20 µm expansion after stress relief annealing as compared to the precedent step, a −18 µm shrinkage after part removal and, finally, a −50 µm shrinkage after micro shot peening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Development in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review on Binder Jet Additive Manufacturing of 316L Stainless Steel
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2019, 3(3), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp3030082 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
Binder jet additive manufacturing enables the production of complex components for numerous applications. Binder jetting is the only powder bed additive manufacturing process that is not fusion-based, thus manufactured parts have no residual stresses as opposed to laser-based additive manufacturing processes. Binder jet [...] Read more.
Binder jet additive manufacturing enables the production of complex components for numerous applications. Binder jetting is the only powder bed additive manufacturing process that is not fusion-based, thus manufactured parts have no residual stresses as opposed to laser-based additive manufacturing processes. Binder jet technology can be adopted for the production of various small and large metallic parts for specific applications, including in the biomedical and energy sectors, at a lower cost and shorter lead time. One of the most well-known types of stainless steels for various industries is 316L, which has been extensively manufactured using binder jet technology. Binder jet manufactured 316L parts have obtained near full density and, in some cases, similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally manufactured parts. This article introduces methods, principles, and applications of binder jetting of SS 316L. Details of binder jetting processes, including powder characteristics (shape and size), binder properties (binder chemistry and droplet formation mechanism), printing process parameters (such as layer thickness, binder saturation, drying time), and post-processing sintering mechanism and densification processes, are carefully reviewed. Furthermore, critical factors in the selection of feedstock, printing parameters, sintering temperature, time, atmosphere, and heating rate of 316L binder jet manufactured parts are highlighted and summarized. Finally, the above-mentioned processing parameters are correlated with final density and mechanical properties of 316L components to establish a guideline on feedstock selection and process parameters optimization to achieve desired density, structure and properties for various applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Development in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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